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2013 - International Communication Association Words: 213 words || 
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1. Ong, Jonathan. "Offence as Presence, Presence as Offence: Classed Cultures of Visibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634621_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: This paper discusses the various ways in which crossing over from the ‘ordinary world’ to the ‘media world’ (Couldry, 2000) are constitutive of offence. On one hand, media producers’ practices of recruiting ordinary people to participate in trashy talk shows and reality shows are commonly received as offensive by middle-class critics, insofar as unequal and artificial structures of representation govern these transactions. On the other hand, visibility contests, ‘presencing’ (Couldry, 2012), and position-taking in the mediated space of appearance are increasingly regarded not as means but as ends in themselves: media recognition is the constitutive symbolic flourish that legitimizes both acts of political claims-making and personal performances of victimhood. These two movements–offence as presence, and presence as offence–are discussed here using examples from an ethnography of television, their working-class and poor audiences, and their middle-class critics in class-divided Philippines.

A graduate of Cambridge University, Jonathan Corpus Ong is currently Assistant Professor in Sociology at Hong Kong Baptist University. His research on media ethics, new media and migration, and mediated politics has been published in Media Culture & Society, Television & New Media, and Communication, Culture & Critique. His first book The Poverty of Television is forthcoming from Anthem Press. He was the first Graduate Student Representative of the Popular Communication Division of the ICA.

2011 - The Law and Society Association Words: 286 words || 
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2. Houlihan, Annette. "Offences against the (Moral) Person: HIV Transmission Offences in Australia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Westin St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, CA, May 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p495918_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: HIV/AIDS has been criminalized in many jurisdictions, including Australia. HIV transmission offenders have been constructed upon panics about cultural, medical and legal Otherness. Dis-eased bodies are prosecuted because of compound transgressions – HIV status, race and sexuality. The HIV transmission story is reflected and imagined through the textual crimes of offences against the person. This crimino-legal tale flickers its own imagination onto the cultural landscape where consensual desires are silenced in honour of the tragedy of the reckless or intentional HIV transmission offender. HIV infectivity is translated as an injury committed by one party against another. But, the crimino-legal narrative of HIV transmission offences speaks about the policing of desire, just as much as it does about the regulation of Other infectious bodies – as illness and illegality.
This paper examines media coverage of the case of Michael Neal who was sentenced to 18 years jail for HIV transmission offences in 2009. Neal was portrayed as an evil, vindictive criminal in television and newspaper reports. His monstrous culpability was compounded by the sub-text of bisexuality and hedonism, but also his implied transcendence from heteronormativity to homodeviance. He was described as a (heterosexual) grandfather who was married for many years before succumbing to a predatory life of homosexual recklessness. Neal became the noughties poster-boy of debauchery and criminal sexuality. His sexuality was located within various esoteric, depraved and rapacious imaginations, such as sadomasochism, gay orgies and conversion parties. He became a simulacrum of the ‘grim reaper’ of early Australian AIDS campaigns whereby he signified an indeterminate HIV risk for multiple unknown innocents. He was both risky and culpable. This paper will explore the construction of his risky criminal identity within the socio-legal imagination of HIV transmission criminality.

2012 - The Law and Society Association Words: 372 words || 
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3. Houlihan, Annette. "Offences against the (Moral) Person: HIV Transmission Offences in Australia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort, Honolulu, HI, Jun 03, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p558074_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: HIV/AIDS has been criminalized in many jurisdictions, including Australia. HIV transmission offenders have been constructed upon panics about cultural, medical and legal Otherness. Dis-eased bodies are prosecuted because of compound transgressions – HIV status, race and sexuality. The HIV transmission story is reflected and imagined through the textual crimes of offences against the person. This crimino-legal tale flickers its own imagination onto the cultural landscape where consensual desires are silenced in honour of the tragedy of the reckless or intentional HIV transmission offender. HIV infectivity is translated as an injury committed by one party against another. But, the crimino-legal narrative of HIV transmission offences speaks about the policing of desire, just as much as it does about the regulation of Other infectious bodies – as illness and illegality.
This paper explores the trajectory of the infamous Neal case in Victoria. The defendant, Michael Neal, was sentenced to 18 years jail for inter alia HIV-related offences in 2009, which was reduced to 12 years jail on appeal.
It begins with an examination of media coverage of the case, in which Neal was portrayed as an evil, vindictive criminal in television and newspaper reports. His monstrous culpability was compounded by the sub-text of bisexuality and hedonism, but also his implied transcendence from heteronormativity to homodeviance. He was described as a (heterosexual) grandfather who was married for many years before succumbing to a predatory life of homosexual recklessness. Neal became the noughties poster-boy of debauchery and criminal sexuality. His sexuality was located within various esoteric, depraved and rapacious imaginations, such as sadomasochism, gay orgies and conversion parties. He became a simulacrum of the ‘grim reaper’ of early Australian AIDS campaigns whereby he signified an indeterminate HIV risk for multiple unknown innocents. He was both risky and culpable. This paper will explore the construction of his risky criminal identity within the socio-legal imagination of HIV transmission criminality.
The paper will conclude with a discussion of the appeal. This has been one of the very few HIV-related criminal cases that has gone to appeal, with most other defendants entering guilty pleas. The paper will explore possible legal ramifications this appeal may have for future prosecutions and how this judgment could challenge the criminalisation of HIV risk.

2013 - International Communication Association Words: 221 words || 
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4. Frosh, Paul. "Sticks and Stones: Media Ubiquity, Victimhood, and the Expansion of Offence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634618_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Can there be discourse without harm? The etymology of the word ‘offence’–- combining senses of sin, insult, grievance, and military aggression--suggests that the injuries of discourse traverse the boundaries between the symbolic and the physical. This paper proposes a threefold conceptual framework for grasping the contemporary expansion of offence: 1) the ubiquity of networked digital devices has greatly increased connectivity between possible offenders and ‘offendees’ as well as the likelihood of recording potentially offensive occurrences; 2) the modern expansion of the category of victimhood from physical violence to more diffuse harms means that one can be a ‘victim’ of bodily assault, but also of fashion, circumstances, and the insults of others; 3) the redefinition of group rights around cultural identity within a politics of recognition means that claims of discursive victimhood have become crucial forms of capital: offence is increasingly a ritual public display in a struggle for legitimation.

Paul Frosh is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication and Journalism, and Distinguished Scholar at the Rothberg International School of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has written and edited four books, including The Image Factory: Consumer Culture, Photography and the Visual Content Industry (2003) and Media Witnessing: Testimony in the Age of Mass Communication (2009, edited with Amit Pinchevski). The Poetics of Media: Imagination and Communication, is forthcoming from Polity Press.

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