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Showing 1 through 5 of 1,546 records.
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2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 182 words || 
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1. Settles, Tanya. "Social Worker or Parole Officer: Role Differences Between Traditional Parole Officers and District Resource Officers in the State of Texas" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32286_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the State of Texas, there are essentially two types of parole officers: The first type consists of traditional officers who follow techniques of close supervision and surveillance of formerly incarcerated offenders, often operating with the goal of reincarceration in mind. The second category include those officers assigned exclusively to what are termed District Resource Centers (DRCs), and their jobs are functionally different. In addition to the more usual surveillance techniques, parole officers assigned to the DRCs are also responsible for developing a curriculum for different types of counseling based groups such as cognitive development, drug and alcohol counseling, and moral recognition therapy and participation in restorative justice processes. Taking on a role more traditionally held by a certified counselor or licensed social worker is a departure from customary practices for the state of Texas and other places in the country. This project evaluates whether one category or the other is more effective as indicated by two key measures: discernable differences in recidivism, including technical violations of parole, and differences in job satisfaction by the officers.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 150 words || 
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2. Valentine, Colby. "Occupational Stress and Officers: The Relationship between Stress and Officer-Involved Domestic Violence using a GST Framework" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431380_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Criminal justice officers are known to have one of the most stressful occupations. High levels of occupational stress can compromise the safety and well being of not only the officers themselves, but also of those who interact with the officers outside of the job. Prior research has identified Agnew’s (1992) General Strain Theory (GST) as a theoretical framework to understand the relationship between stress and police officers. The current study examines the relationship between occupational stress and officer-involved domestic violence. This paper further extends research on the generality of GST by examining officer-involved domestic violence among different types officers (i.e. police, corrections and highway patrol) from multiple agencies throughout the state of Florida. Data used in this study come from the Law Enforcement Family Partnership (LEFP) study. Theoretical and policy implications of the findings are discussed and suggestions are made regarding future research in this area.

2006 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 42 pages || Words: 10787 words || 
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3. Alexander, Amy. "Gendered Contexts of Office Holding and Candidacy?: A Look at the offices of Mayor and Council Member in California Cities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Albuquerque, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Mar 17, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p97742_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent research on corollaries of female office holding at the local level is lacking and there is almost no research on correlates of female candidacy at this level. Furthermore, of the studies conducted on female office holding, discrepant results leave several important hypotheses inconclusive. In this study, I look at cross-sectional data from a larger longitudinal investigation assessing the office-holding and political candidacy of women in California cities. Specifically, a random sample of 105 cities in California is analyzed. Focusing on the offices of council member and mayor, a number of descriptive and inferential statistics are used to address several hypotheses regarding correlates of female office holding. Moreover, this study uniquely extends these hypotheses to an evaluation of female candidacy at this level. The hypotheses explored include the desirability hypothesis, the competition hypothesis and the diversity hypothesis as well as other competing political, socioeconomic and demographic explanations of female office-holding.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 89 words || 
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4. Otenyo, Eric. "The District Officer: Still a colonial shell?_x000d__x000d_An Appraisal of the Officers' role in political development in Kenya" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362198_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The District Officer: Still a colonial shell?_x000d__x000d_An Appraisal of the Officers' role in political development in Kenya_x000d__x000d_Abstract_x000d_This paper examines the role of District Offers in Kenya’s political development. The author argues that institutions established during the colonial times have shown a remarkable sense of resilience and have only been marginally changed. In this paper, the author identifies the office of District Officer as one of the important elements in provincial administration that has served all the post-colonial governments in ways similar to those inherited from the British colonial establishment.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 203 words || 
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5. Tucker, Jane. "What Shapes Officer Willingness to Use Stress Intervention Services? The Police Officer Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p515490_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In spite of overwhelming evidence of the negative consequences of untreated police stress, stress intervention services remain under-utilized by police officers. Researchers cite confidentiality issues, stigma surrounding use of services, and a general lack of confidence in professional service providers as factors which negatively influence the use of services. Few empirical studies have focused on a systematic examination of these factors, particularly in light of the growth of service offerings over the last twenty years. Understanding what shapes officer willingness to use services remains a critical step in addressing the negative effects of police stress. This study examines the factors that influence officer willingness to use services, from the perspective of the police officer.
Interviews were conducted with 40 police officers throughout the state of Pennsylvania. The interviews provided a wealth of information concerning the availability and use of stress intervention services. Officers reported concerns regarding the confidentiality of services and stigma surrounding the use of services. However, officers varied in their views of professional service providers. Officers provided rich accounts of what types of stressors have the most impact on their lives and how the organization influences officer use of services.

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