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2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 148 words || 
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1. Martin, Christopher. "Outliving the Fashion: John Taylor’s The Old, Old, Very Old Man" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p929422_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Although the work of a minor poet recounting the dubious case of the purportedly 152-year-old Shropshire resident Thomas Parr, John Taylor’s The Old, Old, Very Old Man (1635) provides a valuable glimpse of the fantasies and meditations that had begun to collect around conceptions of old age in Caroline England. Taylor ostensibly aims to celebrate Parr’s simplistic, rustic lifestyle as an exemplum of the rewards one may glean from “living within bounds of Natures Lawes,” and to use the nostalgic retrospect of the old man’s long history to chastise the transgressions of a decadent present. Yet his didacticism repeatedly yields to more circumspect reflections on one who has “out-liv’d the Fashion at least 40 times over,” in ways that discover an array of concerns running from the endurance of masculine mental and physical potency to the fragile relevance of historical progress itself before such “mortall Monuments” as Parr.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Tsalas, Nike., Paulus, Markus. and Sodian, Beate. "Metacognitive spacing decisions in 7-year olds, 10-year olds and adults and the effect of self-feedback" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955856_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The spacing effect is the phenomenon that temporally interrupted studying improves memory performance (Ebbinghaus, 1964). Within a metacognitive context, research suggests that adults but not first graders use their metacognitions to guide their spacing choices (Son, 2004;Son, 2005). This is in line with findings that children have problems to translate their metacognitive monitoring into appropriate control strategies (Dufresne & Kobasigawa, 1989). In the current study we investigated whether self-feedback gained from a repeated study trial would influence participants' learning behavior. Previous studies suggest that repeated study trials can improve metacognitive monitoring (Koriat, 1997). Yet, it would be important to examine in greater detail whether also metacognitive control benefits from these experiences and furthermore, whether also children incorporate such feedback into their monitoring and control behaviour.
We tested 7-year olds (N= 31) 10-year olds (N=27,) and adults (N=29). Participants were presented with 2 learning blocks of picture pairs (easy, medium, difficult). They had to make Judgments of Learning (JoL) to predict their future memory performance and had to decide whether to space, mass or terminate their study on an item-by-item basis. Participants experienced a recall phase after the first learning block to gain performance feedback on the outcome of their monitoring and strategy choices before the second learning block.
Results showed that even young children used their metacognitions to guide their spacing decisions, however in a less differentiated way than adults (Figure 1). We further examined whether participants' monitoring and control changed in the second learning block. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Learning Block and relative performance prediction (gamma correlations between JoL and performance) as within subject factor and Age Group as a between subjects factor, yielded a main effect of Learning Block F (1, 71) =7, 71 p<. 05. Participants’ gamma correlations were stronger in the second learning block (M=0,796) than in the first learning block (M=0,620) suggesting that they improved their performance prediction in the second block. Planned post-hoc analysis for each age group revealed that this effect was driven by changes in performance predictions made by 7-year olds (Table 1).
A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Learning Block, Item difficulty and Strategy as within subjects factors and Age Group as a between subject factor yielded a three way interaction between Learning Block, Difficulty and Strategy F (2.99, 336) =3.47, p<.05, η2 =.04. Paired sample t-tests of strategy choice per item difficulty for both learning blocks and across age groups showed that more easy items of the first (37.74%) than of the second learning block (24.71%) were chosen to be seen again later (all ps <.05). Furthermore, the option to terminate study was chosen for more easy items of the second (69.63%) than of the first learning block (57.75%) (all ps <.05).
The current study showed that already 7-year-olds use their metacognitions to guide their spacing choices and that the monitoring and control of participants of all age groups changed in a repeated learning trial after receiving self-feedback on their previous performance.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 10667 words || 
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3. Jung, Eura. "Elaborating Identity Gap Scale: Cross-Validation of Old Scale, Development of New Scale, and MTMM Analysis of Combined Scale of Old and New" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424357_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study attempted to develop an identity gap scale measured by multi-methods. In Study 1, the factor structure of the existing scale was tested by the cross-validation technique. A new scale was developed to diversify measuring methods Study 2. The Study 3 established the construct validity of the combined scale of the old and the new by MTMM analysis. In Study 4, moderation effects of valence of identity gaps was tested.

2011 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7087 words || 
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4. Darlington, Kay-Anne. "Same old, same old? A content analysis of the framing of Haiti in the news after the 2010 earthquake in the Jamaica Gleaner & the New York Times" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519502_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This content analysis outlines the framing of Haiti in the Gleaner and New York Times coverage after the 2010 earthquake. The results confirm continued negative framing of Haiti using frames such as poverty, violence and political instability, thereby facilitating the ‘othering’ of Haiti. While these frames may help readers understand the disaster, they also exacerbate Haiti’s problems by ensuring that readers remain unaware of/unresponsive to the real issues facing Haiti.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Wertz, Annie., Kominsky, Jonathan., Strickland, Brent., Keil, Frank. and Wynn, Karen. "9-Month-Olds, But Not 7-Month-Olds, Show Sensitivity to Principles of Newtonian Physics in Causal Launching Events" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957026_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the most remarkable features of human perception is its ability to represent causation. Here we demonstrate that causal perception is sensitive to certain principles of Newtonian mechanics in collision events in adults and infants as young as 9 months of age. Consider two balls, A and B, with A moving towards B at 1 m/s and B at rest. When A contacts B, A stops moving and B begins moving in the same direction. According to Newtonian mechanics of elastic collisions, B cannot move faster than 2 m/s in this example, even if A were infinitely more massive than B. While causal perception may not represent this speed limit precisely, we propose that adults and infants will be sensitive to violations of this principle. However, they should not be sensitive to events with similarly asymmetric speed ratios (e.g., A moving at 3 m/s and B moving at 1 m/s) that are possible if B is much more massive.

In Experiment 1, we presented adults with three collision events simultaneously, each of which continuously repeated. The objects in these events had two possible speeds, one slow ("1") and one fast ("3"). In one collision event, both objects moved at speed 1, so the speed ratio of the two objects (A:B) was 1:1. In the second event, both moved at speed 3 (3:3). In the third event, the “launching” object moved at one speed and the “launched” object moved at the other. The asymmetric speed ratio of this target event was either possible under Newtonian mechanics (3:1) or impossible (1:3). Adults were asked to identify the asymmetric event as quickly as possible. Adults were significantly faster to detect physically impossible asymmetric events (1:3) than physically possible ones (3:1), t(12) = -3.751, p = .003. However, they were equally fast to detect both speed ratios in non-causal events, specifically a temporal gap, spatial gap, or "slip" overlap event, ps >= .16 (Fig. 1).

In Experiment 2, we examined the developmental origins of this sensitivity. One possibility is that this sensitivity is a core component of causal perception and emerges with it around 6 months (Leslie & Keeble, 1987). A second possibility is that the visual sensitivity to impossible launching events is a distinct capacity and emerges only after causal perception is in place. In our study, 7-month-old infants (N = 16, 8 male, average age 6;27) and 9-month-old infants (N = 15, 7 male, average age 9;15) were habituated to 1:1 launching events. Following habituation, they saw a single asymmetric launching event at either a possible (3:1) or impossible (1:3) speed ratio, between-subjects. 9-month-olds looked significantly longer at impossible events than possible events, t(13) = 2.37, p = .034. However, 7-month-olds looked equally long at both event types, t(14) = 1.27, p = .22 (Fig. 2). Data collection is currently underway on non-causal control conditions. Thus far, these results suggest that sensitivity to the Newtonian principles governing collision events emerges after infants’ ability to detect causal launching events.

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