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2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Vogelsang, Eric. and Raymo, James. "Older Places and Older-Adult Health Trajectories in Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119886_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines relationships between living in relatively older and younger municipalities and three health outcomes (self-rated health; age-comparative health; and depressive symptoms). Using a national sample of almost 5,000 Japanese older adults over two decades, I employ hierarchical growth curve logistic regression models to estimate health trajectories by local area age structure.

Living in the oldest Japanese municipalities was generally associated with a greater probability of reporting more unfavorable health outcomes between ages 60 and 80; when compared to living in relatively younger areas. For two health outcomes (self-rated health and depressive symptoms) these relationships could not be explained by two commonly-used measures of social functioning at the municipal level (economic performance and residential stability). This study also reveals that greater individual-level social engagement among older adults living in oldest areas help protect against reporting even worse health.

Residential age structure remains a relatively unexplored measure in the body of research that links health and place. These findings have important implications in an aging world.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6011 words || 
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2. York, Erin. and Cornwell, Benjamin. "How the Older Half Lives: Examining Home Disorder Among Older Adults" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105249_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Psychological and biomedical research suggests that environmental assaults, such as loud noise, cold temperatures, and unpleasant odors can negatively impact physical and mental well-being (Graeven 1974; Duvall and Booth 1978; Lowry 1989). Since older adults spend about 80% of their time in the home, the interior home environment may have particularly salient impacts on quality of life. This paper examines home environments of older adults using interviewer assessments of cleanliness, tidiness, noise, odor, lighting, and temperature from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP). We find that while most older Americans have home environments that are generally orderly, several less pleasant characteristics (e.g. messiness, dirtiness, foul odors) tend to cluster together within some homes. We describe a preliminary analysis indicating that home disorder can have a negative impact on health, social relationships, and quality of life. We close by considering implications for future research.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 207 words || 
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3. Pickard, Susan. "A New Political Anatomy of the Older Body? Practices in Primary Care towards Older Age" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562266_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper I examine the new approaches to older bodies found within UK primary care, with the purpose of determining whether they represent a significant disjunction from established approaches in geriatric medicine. To do this I examine the practices established by the Quality and Outcome Frameworks (QOFs) in England, which, as part of the 2004 General Medical Services contract, introduced evidence-based guidance for chronic conditions commonly found with older patients. I draw upon empirical data, specifically the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) and Practice Nurses involved in administering the new chronic disease management technologies to older patients. I explore the changes in approach that these practitioners identify and whether these changes are significant enough to warrant describing them as representative of an epistemic rupture or break in the way older bodies are perceived, in medicine and also in society more generally, and thus of constituting a new political anatomy of the older body. Whilst this paper draws on the UK context, its relevance extends beyond its setting, particularly as evidence-based medicine has been introduced internationally, whilst the intertwining of medical and cultural approaches to health, illness and ageing is of significance beyond any national borders.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7832 words || 
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4. Kwon, Kyounghee. and Moon, Shin-Il. "Reciprocal Social Support for Older Adults: Giving as a Beneficial Moderator between Received Support and Older AdultsÂ’ Psychological Health Problems" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368550_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explores the role of support giving in improving older adults' psychological health. Highlighting the importance of reciprocity in supportive relationship, the study explores whether support giving moderates between receiving support and older adultsÂ’ psychological health. With the two representative psychological problems, depression and anxiety, the results suggest that different supportive relationships show differentiated impacts on psychological health and support giving plays a moderator especially when older adults receive the low level of support.

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