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2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 238 words || 
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1. Cheng, Fan-Ting. "Towards a Queer, Minor-transAsian Protest: Wang Mo-Lin’s Antigone (2013)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1193565_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In not refusing to grieve the loss, how does a performance mourn for officially “ungrievable” lives and thereby contest the institutional violence implicated in the sensitive and subtle national status of Taiwan? Since 2000, many Taiwanese artists have been approaching diverse forms of resistance against Chinese-centrist constructions designated by the Kuomintang. Theater practitioner and social activist Wang Mo-Lin’s Antigone, premiered in Taipei in 2013, has proposed an alternative measure of politics that implicit in minor-transAsian protest-performance that probes into political traumas of different contexts. Collaborated by Hong Seung-Yi and Baek Dae-Hyun from Korea, Cheng Yin-Jen from Taiwan, and Ho Yu-Fan from China, the piece retells Sophocles’ play Antigone through the queer lens of the 228 Incident in 1947 in Taiwan, the Gwangju massacre in 1980 in Republic of Korea, and the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989 in People’s Republic of China. Antigone highlights the analogous structure of these traumas, suggesting a novel tactic of networking “political minorities” among different countries in East Asia. This paper, grounded in Gayatri Spivak’s strategic essentialism, Randy Martin’s body discourse as well as Shu-Mei Shih and Françoise Lionnet’s minor transnationalism, seeks to intertwine the contemporary operation of the historical events into the analysis of the performance and ultimately stress a potential transAsian conversation that urges for a re-grief for the unmourned victims in the past, a reconsideration of the political status quo, and a vision of the future relationship among countries in Asia.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 272 words || 
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2. Denman, Michael. "Identities from Shao-Lin: Identity and Culture in 1970’s Hong Kong Kung Fu Genre Movies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1188457_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In the 1970’s, the Hong Kong cinema industry exploded internationally with the popularity of the “kung fu craze”. The kung fu genre, particularly as crafted by the Shaw Brothers Studio, often featured macho protagonists, blood-drenched violence and gritty, historical based plot lines. One of the most popular plot settings for the Shaw Brothers kung fu movies of the 1970’s was the legend of the sacking of the Shaolin Temple by the Qing military. Underneath the violence and martial arts spectacle of the kung fu movies, particularly the ones dealing with the Shaolin Temple, lies a set of themes which deal with formative identity experiences: betrayal, exile, loss of loved ones, rise of a new generation. The rise of the kung fu genre came at a time when Hong Kong itself was finding a new expression of identity. Hong Kong in the mid-20th Century had been greatly influenced by troubles on the mainland and the massive influx of immigrants into the territory. By 1971, the population of Hong Kong was pushing the four million mark with roughly half the population under the age of 25. This marked the rise of a massive Hong Kong generation that hadn’t come there as immigrants, but were born as part of Hong Kong. This paper seeks to show that the rise of the kung fu genre, with its specific themes, grew concurrently with the rise of a new Hong Kong culture coming into the 1970’s. There will be an analysis of the themes, production and individuals involved in the kung fu movies and how they influenced and were reflective of the Hong Kong of the 1970’s.

2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 229 words || 
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3. Yang, Suh-jen. "A Classic Fervor’s Commentaries: Lin Shu’s Interpretations on Han Yu’s Stele Inscription" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p991365_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Lin Shu (1852-1924), translator, poet, novelist, playwright, and painter, was a fervent defender of Chinese classical literature during the time of transition from the Qing to the Republican era, and a heated debater against the modernists. Unfortunately, his achievements in classical literature were shadowed by his prolific translations, more than 200 works in total, in the past few decades among academic circles. He proclaimed himself a knowledgeable scholar of Han Yu (768-824) and other classical prose writers for more than 45 years, and was a strong commentator on their works. However, few scholarly works have been done on his achievements in this regard. This paper attempts to analyze Lin Shu’s critical commentaries toward Han Yu’s works, with a focus on the inscription writings, and tries to answer the following questions: Does Lin Shu’s knowledge of the protagonists’ description in Western novels and drama affect his understanding of Han Yu’s writing approach to the main character in the stele inscription? How does Lin’s approach to Han Yu’s works, from the traditional philological and phonological aspects, reveal the essence of the inscription genre? Finally, as an avid student of classical literature, how do Lin Shu’s analyses of Han Yu’s works differ from other critics during the Qing? In sum, this paper sheds new light on revealing Lin Shu’s critical insights, and helps us understand Han Yu’s writing in more profound ways.

2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 192 words || 
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4. Cheng, Fan-Ting. "Performing the National Uncanny of Taiwan: Wang Mo Lin’s A Soldier’s Pay (2004)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p952469_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Premiered at Guling Street Avant-garde Theatre in 2004, Wang Mo Lin’s A Soldier’s Pay is a performance based on the 1999 Taipei Armed Force Museum rape-murder case, which, according to the emerging evidence, was covered up and buried within the National Army’s swift judgment and was never investigated again. Instead of representing the exact case in an entirely historically accurate manner, A Soldier’s Pay combines sound arts, visual projections and stage installations with un-realist performance to explore the complication of national myth, institutional power, gender norms, and sexual violence. Employing Sigmund Freud’s notion of uncanny and Maria Mevacqua’s discussion on the issue of rape and state, I examine the way in which A Soldier’s Pay represents the forgotten and erased murder case and the embedded national identity through its grotesque staging and acting on stage. A Soldier’s Pay provides a thrilling experience of watching performance and thus alerts the audience to the aesthetic illusion of harmony constructed by the collusion of Kuomintang’s Chinese-centrist identity and pleasurable artistic taste/entertainment. Performance here functions to conjure up or recall those repressed and unspeakable traumas caused by the government’s various kinds of oppression of their citizenry.

2016 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 234 words || 
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5. Wu, I-Hsien. "Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Lin Daiyu in 21st-Century Mass Media Production" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, <Not Available>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1073434_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Lin Daiyu, the beautiful and talented, vulnerable and frail, yet sickly and moody heroine, is arguably the most captivating character in “Dream of the Red Chamber.” Since the novel’s publication, one iconic scene in particular has captured this character’s essence: “Daiyu Burying Fallen Blossoms,” a scene repeatedly adapted in various media from woodblock prints to film, celebrated not only by ardent readers but also by people who have never read the novel. This paper investigates the fate of this scene in contemporary mass culture by asking what happens when the visual representation of Daiyu is taken out of the instantly-recognizable act of flower burial in the all too familiar setting of Prospect Garden. Focusing on the 2011 Hong Kong singer Denise Ho’s music video “Chiqing si” (Department of Infatuation), in which the imagery is reduced to close-ups of two actresses playing Baoyu and Daiyu and the idea of flower burial is only faintly suggested by a floating gauze with flowery print, I argue that the abstract presentation not only deconstructs and reconstructs Daiyu’s character, but also creates new angles for dialogues between the novel and contemporary music, theater, fashion photography, and cinematography. As the video seduces the viewers with celebrity culture, gender fluidity, eroticism, and technology, it challenges the viewers to re-envision the classic beyond the highly codified pictorial traditions based on the novel, creating reading/viewing experiences that are unequivocally distinctive and personal.

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