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2007 - North American Association For Environmental Education Words: 48 words || 
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1. Strauss, Rochelle. "One Well, One Voice – Saving Water in the Earth’s One Well" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Association For Environmental Education, Virginia Beach Convention Center, Virginia Beach, Virginia, Nov 13, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p185897_index.html>
Publication Type: Traditional Presentation
Abstract: Award-winning author and environmental educator Rochelle Strauss explores the themes found in her new book – One Well: the Story of Water on Earth. A review of ideas, activities and lesson plans will provide educators with innovative tools to teach about water and empower students to take action.

2012 - Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 246 words || 
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2. Daly, Mary. and Copeland, Paul. "One Target, One Guideline and One Flagship Initiative: Social Policy in the Europe 2020 Strategy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA, Mar 22, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547178_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper situates the ‘social element’ of Europe 2020 within a broader understanding of EU social policy at both the national and transnational levels, and of the political economy of European integration. The guiding research question is whether Europe 2020 represents progress towards a stronger EU social policy process. The empirical substance of the paper analyses the nature of the agreement (the target, the guideline and the Flagship Initiative) and how Member States have responded to it. The paper reaches three conclusions with respect to the EU’s latest attempt to further integration within the social sphere. Firstly, there are weaknesses inherent in the poverty approach adopted. The underlying principles of the poverty target and accompanying Flagship Initiative represent a patchwork of competing ideologies that have different and often competing underlying normative connotations. Secondly, a broader analysis of Europe 2020 via its overall prioritisation and governance mechanism reveals the ‘spill-back’ of EU social policy. Monetary and fiscal discipline forms the central underlying principle of the reform strategy and this downgrades the poverty target and social policy as a priority (for Member States and the EU). Thirdly, the current phase of European integration is dominated by liberalisers who prioritise European integration as a pure market-making project with minimal integration within the social sphere, in contrast to the political constellations which led to the launching of the Lisbon Strategy. As such, not only is the 2020 poverty target ‘symbolic’ but future integration within EU social policy is highly unlikely.

2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 238 words || 
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3. O'Neill, Daniel. "One Road, One Belt, One Regime Type: The Limits of Chinese Influence in Developing States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1100154_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This qualitative comparative study analyzes efforts by the Chinese government to influence developing state governments to support foreign investments by Chinese firms. The high levels of political risk and corruption along with weak rule of law usually found to deter foreign direct investment (FDI) in many of these states present both difficulties and opportunities for Chinese firms seeking to expand abroad. Policies of the Chinese state in support of these firms attempt to overcome the difficulties and make the most of the opportunities by gaining the support of foreign state leaders in order to protect China's outward FDI. A range of cases of Chinese investment efforts on several continents show that regime type -the degree to which a state is comprised of authoritarian or democratic institutions- is the key independent variable in determining the extent to which China is able to influence foreign governments in support of Chinese FDI in developing states. While authoritarian institutions in the FDI receiving state provide opportunities for China to influence the host government by expanding the resources available for it to retain power, even imperfect democratic institutions offer voice to opponents of Chinese investments and provide incentives for politicians to reject the financial resources China provides in order to gain the support of voters and a broader range of interest groups. This increases the likelihood of opposition to Chinese firms’ investments, particularly investment by China’s state owned enterprises, in developing, democratic states.

2012 - ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 268 words || 
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4. Penic, Sandra., Spini, Dario. and Jelic, Margareta. "“One nation, one god, one state”: The relationship between religious practice and national identity in Croatia and Serbia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting, Mart Plaza, Chicago, IL, Jul 06, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p570809_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Following the violent dissolution of former Yugoslavia, religious organizations played an important role in rebuilding the nation-states in Croatia and Serbia. The number of religious persons rose dramatically, and religious identities became intertwined with national identities. Critics of religious organizations in former Yugoslavia, however, stress their role as co-engineers of crisis and conflict and promoters of xenophobic and exclusionary nationalism. In this research, we examine the impact of religious practice on both national attachment and xenophobic national glorification.
The results of multi-level analyses on a representative cohort sample from 34 areas of Croatia and Serbia show that, on a contextual level, living in an area where religion is strongly practiced is not related to stronger feelings of general national attachment. Yet it is a crucial predictor of national glorification and the exclusion of conflict group members. These findings are then complemented by a discourse analysis of the official Catholic Church’s weekly journal in Croatia from 1986 to 2006. These analyses help clarify what constitutes a Croatian national identity (i.e. the boundaries, norms and prototypes), as promoted by the Church. By examining the content of articles over a 20-year time period, one marked by dramatic structural and political changes, we illustrate how certain interpretations of past and present critical collective events are rhetorically constructed in order to promote a particular version of national belonging and disqualify competing ones. Overall, our findings emphasize the importance of studying not only the intensity but also the content of national identities. They further lend insight into the mechanisms by which “entrepreneurs of identity” mobilise people towards accepting particular meanings of national belonging.

2016 - ASEEES Convention Words: 258 words || 
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5. Dusanic, Dunja. "One Language, One Nation, One Literature? The Debates on ‘Yugoslav’ Literature 1913-1919" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1138073_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: For a brief time, in the period immediately preceding and following the First World War, the issue of a unified ‘Yugoslav’ (i.e. Serbian, Croatian and Slovenian) literature was at the forefront of literary discussions in Belgrade and Zagreb. The debates which began in 1913-1914, on the pages of the Serbian Literary Herald (Srpski književni glasnik), with Jovan Skerlić’s survey of public opinion concerning the linguistic foundation of Serbo-Croatian literature, and continued, from 1917 to 1919, in periodicals such as the Literary South (Književni jug) and the Croatian Field (Hrvatska njiva), seemed more preoccupied with the question of dialect and alphabet, than with the task of establishing a shared literary tradition or a joint literary ’agenda’. Based on the erroneous notion that the existence of a shared language implies the existence of a single nation whose unity is simultaneously corroborated and enhanced by the existence of a single national literature, these debates left many questions unanswered and bore few tangible results. Interestingly, some of their participants were to become the authors of influential manuals and histories of ‘Yugoslav’ literature, which defined the canon of national literature for subsequent generations. If books such as Pavle Popović’s Yugoslav Literature (1st ed. 1917), Dragutin Prohaska’s Overview of Contemporary Croatian-Serbian Literature (1st ed. 1921), Miloš Savković’s Yugoslav Literature for secondary schools (1st ed. 1932) and, later on, Antun Barac’s Yugoslav Literature (1st ed. 1954), failed to articulate the desired vision of a shared literary tradition, they did leave behind the highly problematic notion of ‘Yugoslav’ literature, whose heritage is still visible today.

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