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2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 12720 words || 
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1. Tschoertner, Anke Carina., Jers, Cornelia. and Schenk, Michael. "Are All Opinion Leaders Opinion Givers? Are All Opinion Givers Opinion Leaders?: A Clarification of Constructs Based on Empirical Data." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p91554_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Opinion leaders are a prime target group for any company. Studies on consumer behaviour support the importance of personal sources of information and influence. Still, careful attention should be given to methods of identifying these individuals.
We assess existing methods to identify opinion leaders. In particular, we address the question whether the most prominent construct, the King/Summers scale, is able to reliably and validly identify those individuals that perform as opinion givers.
On the basis of a survey of 10’100 respondents on money matters, we test this concept of opinion leadership. We show that without the benefit of ego-centred network analysis any study runs the risk of misjudging the importance of individuals identified as opinion leaders. We suggest a combination of network size and opinion leadership, arriving at a role differentiation of four groups. With this, we draft a communication model for active opinion leaders, communicators, silent experts and inactives.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5602 words || 
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2. Laurison, Daniel. "Where Public Opinion Does (Not) Exist: The Distribution of Opinions (and Non-Opinions) in Social Space" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 20, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p506833_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper takes the 2006 GSS and uses it to, first, map a representation of social space – i.e. the space of social characteristics that structure agents’ ways of seeing the world, and second, to explore the distribution of political opinions within that space. In doing so, it offers a way of “picturing” American public opinion that addresses some of the criticisms often levied against quantitative accounts of attitudes and beliefs. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu and using Multiple Correspondence Analysis techniques (MCA), a subset of Geometric Data Analysis tools (GDA), it is possible to incorporate non-opinions into the analysis, to inductively identify relationships between “independent” social-structural variables and “dependent” opinion ones, and to see the “effects” of social inequality on the types of opinions expressed as well as their content.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document
Supporting Document

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Geber, Sarah. "The Opinion Giving of Opinion Leaders: An Observational Study on Opinion Leadership in Everyday Political Conversations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1229395_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines opinion leadership in informal political conversations. Theoretically, the social psychological perspective on opinion leadership is refined and the goals-plans-action model (Dillard, 1990) is applied to opinion leadership in everyday political conversations. Survey and observational data on conversations of 78 dyads of friends and acquaintances reveal that opinion leadership comes along with the goal to influence, with argument-based opinion giving, and with effects on conversation partner’s opinions. Moreover, results indicate that opinion leadership in political conversations structurally resembles a strategic influence process guided by the goal to influence. By generating concrete findings on communicative influence, this study closes an important academic void of opinion leadership research and provides relevant insights into the political negotiation process.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8204 words || 
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4. Zhang, Jinguang. and Reid, Scott. "Perceived Ingroup Prototypicality Predicts Perceptions of Opinion Commonness and Opinion Consensus Strength: A Self-Categorization Explanation for Public Opinion Perceptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/BINARY>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p555844_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Two important parts of public opinion perception are the ability to assess how widely “our” attitudes are shared by others and how many people favor one attitude position versus another. Both phenomena are well documented but not fully explained. We test a self-categorization for perceptions of opinion commonness (Study 1 and 2) and opinion consensus (Study 3). In Study 1 (N = 131), participants’ perceived ingroup prototypicality positively predicted perceptions of opinion commonness for a high- but not low-normative issue. In Study 2 (N = 189), self-perceived ingroup prototypicality positively predicted perceived opinion commonness, but did so more strongly when ingroup norm was polarized and only with participants high in need for belongingness. In both studies, participants’ personal position on the issue mediated the relationship between perceived ingroup prototypicality and perceptions of opinion commonness, but only in the conditions predicted by self-categorization theory. Finally, in Study 3 (N = 61), perceived ingroup prototypicality positively predicted perceptions of opinion consensus, but only when participants’ social identity was threatened. These findings provide converging evidence for a self-categorization explanation for public opinion perceptions, and extend recent motivational models of public opinion perceptions.

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