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2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 13632 words || 
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1. Prieto, Samuel. "Opportunity and Threat: Political Opportunity Structures and the Place of Immigrant Politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1009807_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing on comparative ethnographic data collected during three years of participant observation, I compare social movement organizing among Mexican immigrant communities in two cities in one California county: one more progressive and the other more repressive. Classic studies in the social movement literature associate growing political opportunity—or the signals in the broader environment that encourage or discourage social movement activity—with the emergence of collective mobilization. Building on more recent scholarship that has problematized classic conceptualizations of political opportunity by examining threat and the perception of threat. I argue that threatening political conditions do not necessarily dampen collective mobilization; instead, they give it shape. Organizers working within social movement organizations (SMOs) try to alter immigrants perception of threat by stressing their shared destiny, not because immigrants need to be convinced that threats exist, but to come to see them as actionable. When organizers are able to convince potential immigrant activists of the value and efficacy of collective action, mobilization emerges. The shape that mobilization takes—more contentious or more collaborative—depends on the local political conditions in which these struggles unfold.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 97 words || 
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2. Wolfe, Scott., Reisig, Michael. and Holtfreter, Kristy. "Opportunity, Offending, and Crime-Analogous Outcomes in Late Life: General Routines or Domain-Specific Opportunities?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p664204_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Routine activity theory guides much of the research focused on the role of opportunity in explaining criminal offending and crime-analogous outcomes. Research shows that general routine activities and domain-specific opportunities are associated with individuals’ participation in offending and exposure to crime-analogous situations (e.g., victimization). To date, however, studies assessing the empirical validity of each approach simultaneously are scant. Using a sample of nearly 2,000 respondents 60 years of age and older, the present study assesses the relative effect of each operational form of opportunity on offending and crime-analogous outcomes. Implications for theory and future research are discussed.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 183 words || 
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3. Morden, Hilary. "Mr. Big: Opportunity for Justice or Opportunity for Abuse?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1278457_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A recent ruling by the Supreme Court of Canada has significantly altered admissibility requirements for confessions garnered during “Mr. Big” undercover operations (see R. v. Hart, 2014 SCC52). The Mr. Big technique is a Canadian invention that has been used successfully by police over the past two decades to secure confessions in hundreds of cases involving serious unsolved crimes. Despite the fact that these confessions are often supported by detailed confirmatory evidence, the technique is open to abuses and carries the risk of unreliable or prejudicial evidence leading to wrongful convictions. Using the new two-prong test of admissibility presented by the Supreme Court of Canada in R. v. Hart, this study examines concerns of reliability, prejudice, and police misconduct related to Mr. Big undercover operations through the case of a recent homicide committed by a Metro-Vancouver drug-addicted female involved in organized crime. This case comes from a larger study involving first person interviews with 87 prolific and super-prolific members of organized crime groups (i.e. crews, gangs, mafia, OMG, etc.) non-incarcerated offenders in Canada conducted between January 2013 and December 2015.

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