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2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 193 words || 
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1. Lascurettes, Kyle. "Orders of Exclusion: The Strategic Sources of International Orders and Great Power Ordering Preferences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502332_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper seeks to account for the origins of great power preferences for international order. I argue that preponderant states attempt to enact foundational rules that they believe will best weaken their principal threat in the international system. To the extent that they are successful in doing so, they are able to create an order premised on weakening, opposing and above all excluding some threatening entity in world politics. In particular, I have identified a number of pathways through which statesmen have strategically manipulated ordering principles to adversely affect their greatest perceived threat. This argument both supports and challenges liberal international relations theory. It supports the liberal contention that even the most powerful states understand that ideas, institutions and rules matter and thus seek to shape international order accordingly. Yet it also challenges liberal explanations for why states act as they do. If my hypotheses are correct, it suggests that great powers advocate major changes in foundational ordering rules not to promote national values, demonstrate their benevolence, or establish a mutually binding institutional order as various liberal theories suggest, but instead for the purpose of standing against something, thus ultimately ‘ordering to exclude.’

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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2. Murakawa, Naomi. "Making the National Crime Problem: Political Order, Racial Order, "Law and Order"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152166_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2007 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 136 words || 
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3. Sorurbakhsh, Laila. "Out of Order?: Voting Order, Ordered Preferences, and Strategic Behavior on the US Supreme Court" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 03, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143101_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While past research on the U.S. Supreme Court's agenda setting decisions
has primarily focused on exploring aspects of the legal and attitudinal
models, this paper investigates the applicability of one aspect of the
strategic model on the justices' certiorari decisions. I hypothesize
that a justice's decision to grant or deny certiorari is motivated in
part by inter-personal influences between the justices. Specifically, I
posit that these decisions are structured by the Court' voting order,
with junior justices susceptible to influence by their more senior
counterparts in order to promote their reputations at the Court.
Building on spatial models, I subject this argument to empirical
validity by examining the justices' certiorari votes in the Vinson and
Warren Courts. The results indicate that voting order matters: the
likelihood of voting to grant certiorari increases sequentially as more
justices vote in favor of certiorari, thus showing an inclination
towards consensus on the Court.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Pages: 25 pages || Words: 11082 words || 
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4. Kamis, Ben. "Putting Order in Order: A Conceptual Analysis of Spontaneous Order for Application to IR" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p313820_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Much of the ontology in international relations is comprised of processes of spontaneous order and their products. Patterns of behavior including customary international law, interstate market interaction, and potentially even systemic phenomena such as

2009 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 111 words || 
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5. Mair, George. "Three Years On: The Community Order and the Suspended Sentence Order" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p369305_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: These two sentences were made available to the courts in England and Wales in April 2005. This paper reports on the results of the third - and final - stage of a three-year study of how the orders are used by the courts, and the views and attitudes of various stakeholders. Trends in the use of the orders will be explored, including how far they seem to be used as an alternative to imprisonment, as will the views of probation officers - who administer the orders - and offenders who have been sentenced to them. The key findings of the study as a whole will also be discussed.

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