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2012 - ARNOVA Annual Conference Words: 91 words || 
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1. Chikoto, Grace., Sadiq, Abdul-Akeem. and Fordyce, Erin. "Disaster Mitigation and Preparedness in Organizations: Are Nonprofit Organizations More Prepared for Disasters than Public and Private Organizations?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA Annual Conference, Hyatt Regency Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p581216_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Few studies have compared the mitigation and preparedness activities adopted by nonprofit, private, and public organizations. This study contributes to this important literature by comparing the adoption of mitigation and preparedness activities by nonprofit, private, and public organizations in Memphis, Tennessee. The findings show that, although nonprofit organizations may be more resource-constrained compared to private corporations, they adopt more mitigation and preparedness activities than private corporations. In addition, public organizations adopt more mitigation and preparedness activities than private organizations. The results are inconclusive on the comparison between nonprofits and public agencies.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 14 pages || Words: 5262 words || 
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2. Jalali, Rita. "When Is a Women's Organization a Movement Organization?: A Comparison of Feminist and Non-feminist Organizations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p106764_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper attempts to determine empirically ways that women’s movement organizations differ from other women’s organizations that are not part of the movement.

Are women’s movement organizations a different species from other women’s organizations? Is an organization run by women and catering to women’s needs part of the women’s movement? What are the essential qualities of WMOs that separate them from non-movement organizations?

This empirical study compares women’s movement organizations (WMOs) on multiple dimensions to other women’s organizations that are not part of the movement. The objective is to confirm or challenge the accepted wisdom about the ideal type of social movement organization. The study confirms some of the arguments put forward by social movement scholars while challenging others.

The study is based on primary survey data collected in India. Organizational profile of forty
women’s organizations provides information on several dimensions on which they are
compared – internal (founding years, size, leadership, structure, funding source, strategies
and tactics) and external characteristics (relations with the state, other civic groups, political
parties, and international links).

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 5663 words || 
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3. Tracy, Betsy. and Jerome, Angela. "19. Is Organic Really Worth It? A Narrative Analysis of the Organic Trade Association’s 'Organic. It’s Worth It.' Campaign" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424994_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent research calls into question claims generated by the organic industry that tout its products as safer, more nutritious, and more environmentally friendly than its conventional counterparts. However, organic food is one of the country’s quickest-growing market segments. In this essay, we use narrative theory to illuminate how the Organic Trade Association has built narrative rationality for American audiences, particularly in the absence of a coherent counter-narrative.

2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 8672 words || 
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4. Balding, Christopher., Chapman, Jana. and Wehrenfennig, Daniel. "Organization Matters to Institutions: Understanding the United Nations and World Trade Organization as Coactivational and Cointegrational Organizations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p97924_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The institutional literature has focused on the institution and actor as constants and their interaction as variable. Additional literature has begun to focus on the institution and its many facets as variables, but there has been scant work done to apply organizational theory to the design of institutions. In other words, does the organizational architecture and design of institutions influence their actions and the actions of their members? We argue that coactivational organizations diffuse norms and the actions of the members more than cointegrational organizations. Coactivational and conitegrational organizations provide differing incentive structures to their members that causes divergent patterns in institution and member behavior.The research will focus on the United Nations General Assembly and the World Trade Organization to understand the importance of organization to institutions. The research will focus first on the theory of coactivational and cointegrational organizations, how they are conceptualized, and their internal mechanisms. Second, we will apply coactivational and cointegrational organization theory to the UN General Assembly and the WTO to better understand the organizational mechanisms and incentives which promote adherence and compliance to norms, values, and standards by members. We argue that the organization of the institution strongly influences what members seek from them, how members utilize them, and their efficacy in diffusing their respective norms, values, and standards. If organization does not matter in institutional efficacy, than any body that holds similar values would achieve similar efficacy in diffusing specific norms.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Christerson, Kelly., Spitzberg, Brian. and Martinez, Lourdes. "Organizing Persuasive Appeals for Organ Donation: A Study of Evidence and Prospect Effects on Organ Donation Messages" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1225614_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous communication studies pertaining to organ procurement and donation have identified attitudinal and knowledge characteristics that accompany the (un)likely donor, but have yet to fully investigate the influence and interactions of dual processing and prospect frames employed by organ donation campaign messages. A randomized 3 (Appeal: narrative vs. statistical vs. combination) x 3 (Frame: gain vs. loss vs. combination) factorial design (N=962) was conducted. Results indicated that no message was more persuasive in changing the intention of the participant to sign an organ donor card. Additionally, personality characteristics such as openness (intellect), conscientiousness, and agreeableness were seen to have an effect on intent to sign an organ donor card when compared to identifying highly with personality characteristics such as extraversion or neuroticism. Implications for health campaign theory and design are considered.

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