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2012 - ARNOVA Annual Conference Words: 91 words || 
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1. Chikoto, Grace., Sadiq, Abdul-Akeem. and Fordyce, Erin. "Disaster Mitigation and Preparedness in Organizations: Are Nonprofit Organizations More Prepared for Disasters than Public and Private Organizations?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA Annual Conference, Hyatt Regency Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p581216_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Few studies have compared the mitigation and preparedness activities adopted by nonprofit, private, and public organizations. This study contributes to this important literature by comparing the adoption of mitigation and preparedness activities by nonprofit, private, and public organizations in Memphis, Tennessee. The findings show that, although nonprofit organizations may be more resource-constrained compared to private corporations, they adopt more mitigation and preparedness activities than private corporations. In addition, public organizations adopt more mitigation and preparedness activities than private organizations. The results are inconclusive on the comparison between nonprofits and public agencies.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6019 words || 
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2. Laz, Cheryl. "Organic industry or organic movement? A case study of organic agriculture in Maine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183934_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper investigates organic agriculture in Maine, with a comparative eye turned to the opposite coast. California’s organic agriculture has been the subject of intense scrutiny (Guthman 2004; Mello 2006; Pollan 2006) and many have reached the conclusion that organic agriculture is bifurcated into an organic industry and an organic movement. Recent analyses have also shown how the organic industry has come to dominate organic agriculture and to replicate many of the undesirable features of conventional agriculture. The analysis of organic agriculture in Maine reveals that, at present, Maine has avoided many of the negative consquences of the organic industry, largely because of the smaller size and scale of the organic sector in Maine and through a deliberate (and state-supported) strategy of localization. Maine’s organic agriculture remains closer to the organic ideal type and to its movement origins, and hence provides one model for an alternative and sustainable agriculture.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 5663 words || 
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3. Tracy, Betsy. and Jerome, Angela. "19. Is Organic Really Worth It? A Narrative Analysis of the Organic Trade Association’s 'Organic. It’s Worth It.' Campaign" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424994_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent research calls into question claims generated by the organic industry that tout its products as safer, more nutritious, and more environmentally friendly than its conventional counterparts. However, organic food is one of the country’s quickest-growing market segments. In this essay, we use narrative theory to illuminate how the Organic Trade Association has built narrative rationality for American audiences, particularly in the absence of a coherent counter-narrative.

2014 - Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting Words: 251 words || 
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4. Mulaly, Leah. "Differential impacts of organic and synthetic pesticides on the non-target organism C. elegans and on the target organism Termitoidae" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Texas A&M Galveston Campus, Galveston, TX, Mar 07, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p729058_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Pesticides can be organic or synthesized to mimic organic pesticides but be more stable in the environment (Davies 2007). Pesticides are absorbed into soil and affect non-target organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we compared the effects of the organic pesticide, pyrethrum, to its synthetic counterpart, cypermethrin, and examined the effects of combining each with an organic synergist, parsley seed oil (PSO), in 1:1, 1:2, and1:3 ratios. PSO alone was also tested. Each treatment was tested on the non-target organism, C. elegans, and the target organism Termitoidae (termites). 11 treatments of OP50 E. coli were prepared using the highest sub-lethal concentration of pesticide (5 μg/mL). After C. elegans cultures were exposed, motility was assessed via thrashing assay in liquid. There were no significant effects on motility of C. elegans. Additionally, lifespan was determined by age-synchronizing worms, exposing them to pesticide, then transferring them to egg-laying inhibitor plates. There were no significant effects on lifespan of C. elegans, but there was an inverse relationship between the concentration of PSO that C. elegans were exposed to and their size, compared to control worms. Termites were exposed to identical OP50 treatments and lifespan was assessed. All termites exposed to PSO, cypermethrin, or both had significantly shorter lifespans than control termites. This suggests that PSO can be used to make cypermethrin effective in smaller doses, or used alone to exterminate pests, without having detrimental effects on C. elegans. Because PSO is biodegradable, these results can be considered in environmentally conscious agricultural practice.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Christerson, Kelly., Spitzberg, Brian. and Martinez, Lourdes. "Organizing Persuasive Appeals for Organ Donation: A Study of Evidence and Prospect Effects on Organ Donation Messages" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1225614_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous communication studies pertaining to organ procurement and donation have identified attitudinal and knowledge characteristics that accompany the (un)likely donor, but have yet to fully investigate the influence and interactions of dual processing and prospect frames employed by organ donation campaign messages. A randomized 3 (Appeal: narrative vs. statistical vs. combination) x 3 (Frame: gain vs. loss vs. combination) factorial design (N=962) was conducted. Results indicated that no message was more persuasive in changing the intention of the participant to sign an organ donor card. Additionally, personality characteristics such as openness (intellect), conscientiousness, and agreeableness were seen to have an effect on intent to sign an organ donor card when compared to identifying highly with personality characteristics such as extraversion or neuroticism. Implications for health campaign theory and design are considered.

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