Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 21 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5  - Next
2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Words: 206 words || 
Info
1. Scepanski, Philip. "“Let's Hope Osama bin Laden Doesn't Learn Showtunes”: Unintentional Irony and the Internet as Cultural Archive" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p984023_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Family Guy joked about bin Laden attacking the US in 2000. Sex and the City made JFK Jr. a character just a week before his plane went down. Reruns and DVDs excised these bits, silencing useful commentary about governmental responsibility regarding 9/11 (Stewie knew; why not Bush?) or removing associations between the post-mortem Kennedy and overly feminized media. Yet I can access records of these ironies and can usually see original clips.

Despite commercial television's attempt to edit its own history, amateur internet archives reveal dramatic irony by showing how television sometimes unintentionally predicts traumatic moments. This creates dramatic intermedial irony reflecting its characters', producers', and audiences' ignorance of momentous future events. In this paper, I argue that internet archives replace television's own commercial historiography to reveal ironic histories. This reveals political and social contradictions and suggests more nuanced temporalities than is often ascribed television and the internet.

Philip Scepanski is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Film, though he also works in the interdisciplinary Media Studies and American Studies programs, at Vassar College where he teaches courses on crisis and catastrophe, comedy and humor, and American broadcast history. His primary research focuses on the ways in which television comedy manages and negotiates moments of American collective trauma.

2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 9603 words || 
Info
2. Sessa, Whitney., North, Michael. and Lang, Katie. "Framing of Osama bin Laden's Death: A Global Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p670303_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Media framing of Osama bin Laden’s death was examined in four international, 24-hour news networks: CNN.com, BBC World News, Al Jazeera English and Al Arabiya English. This study found no association between news network and frames used, suggesting that neither geographical location nor ethnocentrism influenced media frames. In contrast to previous media analyses conducted of bin Laden, this study found the dominant frames of bin Laden to be “neutral figure” or “terrorist leader.”

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8428 words || 
Info
3. Higgins, David. and Mueller, Marion. "(De)Facing the Enemy: The Political Iconography of Dead Enemies From Saddam Hussein and Osama bin Laden to Muammar Gaddafi" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p552039_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper compares the visual content and the specific context in which trophy shots of dead "enemies" to the West are published or not published officially with the most recent cases of Muammar Gaddafi, Osama bin Laden, and the earlier death pictures of Saddam Hussein and al Zarqawi. Additionally the role of 'prosumer' produced visuals that are disseminated via the internet are discussed, and the ehtical predicament of providing 'closure' on the one hand, and not compromising a decent human rights approach are discussed.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6357 words || 
Info
4. Prasad, Monica., Perrin, Andrew., Bezila, Kieran., Hoffman, Steve., Kindleberger, Kate., Manturuk, Kim. and Powers, Ashleigh Smith. ""There Must Be a Reason": Osama, Saddam, and Inferred Justification" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41602_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Why did so many Americans believe Saddam Hussein was behind the 9/11 attacks? Althaus and Largio argue that the resilience of this belief was in fact an artifact of pollsters’ switch to forced-choice questions: although open-ended survey questions find very small percentages blaming Saddam for 9/11, forced choice questions reveal a high proportion of the public willing to believe in Saddam Hussein’s culpability even before the administration shifted its focus from Afghanistan to Iraq, and that this means that “The American public’s apparently widespread belief that Saddam Hussein was responsible for the 9/11 terror attacks was no feat of misdirection by the Bush administration. Instead, the Bush administration inherited and played into a favorable climate of public opinion” (Althaus and Largio, 2004). But where did this favorable climate of public opinion come from? We suggest that answers on forced-choice questions and support for politicians’ actions are both examples of inferred justification: when responding to forced-choice questions, respondents assume that there is a good reason why a name is present among a list of choices (even if there is not); similarly, in judging politicians' actions, voters assume that there is a good reason why a politician supports a policy measure, particularly one as consequential as the decision to go to war. We test this theory on a sample of respondents in Illinois, and show that 20% of respondents give an inferred justification response. In essence, in invading Iraq the administration presented the public with the equivalent of a forced choice survey question of whether or not Saddam was responsible for 9/11; some respondents concluded that, if we invaded Iraq, there must have been a good reason for doing so, and 9/11 seemed to them the most obvious justification.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5  - Next

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy