Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 4,195 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 839 - Next  Jump:
2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 9749 words || 
Info
1. Burleson, Brant., Bodie, Graham., Holmstrom, Amanda., McCullough, Jennifer., Rack, Jennifer., Hanasono, Lisa. and Gill Rosier, Jennifer. "Testing a Dual-Process Theory of Supportive Communication Outcomes: How Source, Message, Contextual, and Recipient Factors Influence Outcomes in Support Situations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424213_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined how source, message, contextual, and recipient factors influenced evaluations of supportive communication. As predicted, the recipient factor (perceived support availability) and contextual factor (problem severity) influenced motivation to process, and thus moderated effects of the message factor (person centeredness) on helpfulness evaluations. A source factor (friend vs. acquaintance) acted as a heuristic when messages were processed less extensively and as a biasing factor when they were processed more extensively.

2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 2270 words || 
Info
2. Nguyen, Jennifer. "Health outcomes in California: An analysis of external factors affecting health outcomes in different socio-demographic variable across California counties" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707850_index.html>
Publication Type: Undergraduate Poster Presentations
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2015 - LRA 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Ruan, Jiening. and Griffith, Priscilla. "A Study of the Impact of a Professional Development Framework on Teacher Outcomes and Student Writing Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 65th Annual Conference, Omni La Costa Resort and Spa, Carlsbad, CA, Dec 02, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1027736_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2013 - LRA 63rd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 2222 words || 
Info
4. Kennedy, Eithne., Shiel, Gerry. and O'Rourke, Maria. "Up-scaling a collaborative professional development intervention to improve literacy ‎outcomes in high-poverty elementary schools: Outcomes for Year One" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 63rd Annual Conference, Omni Dallas Hotel, Dallas, Texas, Dec 04, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p663459_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6481 words || 
Info
5. Pareja, Amber. and Lewis, Dan. "The Impact of Welfare Reform onAcademic Outcomes: Parental Workforce Participation, Welfare, Receipt,and Children’s Academic Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p83798_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Impact of Welfare
Reform on Academic Outcomes
Parental Workforce Participation, Welfare Receipt, and Children’s
Academic Outcomes In this paper, we will examine how changes in the
welfare system brought about by the 1996 Personal Responsibility and
Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) have affected parental
report of children’s academic outcomes. PRWORA put into place the
Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF) program, which was intended to
increase welfare recipients’ workforce participation and decrease their
welfare receipt. These TANF policies, including the 30-hour-per-week
work requirement and 60-month time limit, have led to a nationwide
decrease in the welfare rolls of 56 percent between 1993 and 2000 (U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services, 2000). Thus, the 1996 welfare
reform has generally been heralded as a great success.
In spite of the overwhelming public support for welfare reform, many of
its consequences remain as of yet unknown. For example, we have yet to
find out the kinds of effects that the reform will have on the children
of current and former welfare recipients. Applying the life-course
perspective to the families, the principle of “linked lives” states
that the lives of the parents and children “are lived interdependently,
and social and historical influences are expressed through this network
of shared relationships” (Elder, 1998, p. 4). Thus, policies aimed at
recipients’ workforce participation and welfare receipt will inevitably
affect the recipients’ children as well. We hypothesize that a number
of TANF policies, including the 30-hour-per-week work requirement, may
affect children’s academic and behavioral outcomes through their impact
on parents’ workforce participation and welfare receipt. We also
theorize that parents’ workforce participation and welfare receipt will
have differential affects on children according to their age, with
younger children being more impacted by changes in family income due to
parent’s workforce participation and welfare receipt and adolescents
being more impacted by the amount of time parents spend at work.
Sample, Method, and Findings The data to be used in this study are
taken from the first two waves of the Illinois Families Study (IFS), a
longitudinal study of 1362 respondents who were receiving TANF in the
State of Illinois during September, October, and November of 1998. Our
findings show that children whose parents transitioned from not working
in Wave 1 to working in Wave 2 were significantly more likely to be
achieving academically – receiving A’s and B’s – at Wave 2. Parental
employment at Wave 2 was not found to be a positive factor in all
cases, however. We found that children whose parents were employed in
both waves were significantly less likely to receive A’s and B’s at
Wave 2 than were children whose parents transitioned from not working
to working. We also found that receiving welfare during Wave 2 had a
positive relationship with receiving A’s and B’s at Wave 2, which
suggests that welfare payments may be a protective factor for families.
We argue that parental employment may be beneficial for children’s
academic achievement, particularly if families are able to continue
receiving welfare benefits.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 839 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy