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2006 - Economics of Population Health: Inaugural Conference of the American Society of Health Economists Words: 143 words || 
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1. Zweifel, Peter., Telser, Harry. and Becker, Karolin. "Validity and Reliability of Willingness-to-Pay Estimates: Evidence from Two Overlapping Discrete-Choice Experiments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Economics of Population Health: Inaugural Conference of the American Society of Health Economists, TBA, Madison, WI, USA, Jun 04, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p91534_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Discrete-choice experiments, while becoming increasingly popular, have rarely been tested for validity and reliability. This contribution purports to provide some evidence of a rather uniqe type. Two surveys designed to measure willingess-to-accept (WTA) for reform options in Swiss health care and health insurance are used to provide independent information w th regard to two elements of reform. The issue to be addressed is whether WTA values converge although the three overlapping attributes (a more restrictive drug benefit, delayed access to medical innovation, and a change in the monthly insurance premium) are imbedded in widely differing choice sets. Experimentt A contains rather radical health system reform options. while experiment B concentrates on more familiar elements such as copayments and the benefit catalogue. EWile mean WTA values differ between experiments, the tend to vary in similar ways, suggesting at least theoretical validity and reliability.

2003 - International Communication Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 7842 words || 
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2. Walma van Der Molen, Juliette. and Klijn, Marlies. "The Relative Effect of Television and Print News: Semantic Overlap Versus Reading Control" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112186_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A study of the relative effectiveness of television and print to transmit news information was undertaken by exposing 100 university students to television stories that contained different text-picture formats and by comparing memory for these versions to other participants’ memory for the same news presented in print. The study was designed to retest the validity of two rival explanations for the relative effectiveness of television and print news (the reading control hypothesis versus the semantic overlap hypothesis). Results of a cued-recall test were in favor of the semantic overlap hypothesis. The study suggests that higher levels of semantic overlap between verbal and visual information on television news are decisive for the relative effectiveness of television and print.

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 431 words || 
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3. Bald, Vivek. "The Mysterious Mr. Abdou: Indian Radicals and Sailors in the Overlapping Diasporas of 1920s New York" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p114630_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper will start from a series of British government documents from the early 1920s which track the movements and activities of a New York City shipping employment agent named Mohammed Abdou. Described at different times as a “Hindoo”, a Turk, and an Egyptian, Mr. Abdou worked out of an office overlooking the docks which curled around the southern tip of Manhattan. From that location, he was suspected of being involved in a series of “illegal” and “seditious” acts- including the transport of arms, propaganda, and people -– acts which both violated U.S. immigration laws and abetted the work of New York- based Indian nationalists. As we read these surveillance documents, both at face value and between the lines, Abdou (who appears to have actually been an Egyptian of Turkish descent) emerges as a crucial figure linking together two little known histories of South Asians in early twentieth-century New York – that of a group of Indian radical students and intellectuals who were using New York City as a base from which to mount the violent overthrow of the British in India, and that of the thousands of Indian Muslim maritime workers who were sailing in and out of the port of New York on British merchant marine vessels, jumping ship by the hundreds, working in factories and restaurants, and settling in neighborhoods like the Lower East Side, Hell’s Kitchen, and East Harlem.

Abdoou’s story, and the histories it connects, also provide a lens into processes of political alliance and cultural hybridization which could only have occurred within the context of overlapping diasporas created in a large industrial port-city like New York.
Here we find Indian radicals collaborating with Irish, Egyptian, and “Mesopotamian” nationalist exiles, all using New York as an outpost in their common struggles against the British empire. Here we find Indian sailors marrying Puerto Rican and African American women (themselves recent arrivals to the city from the Caribbean and the U.S. South), their children growing up speaking English, Spanish, and Bengali in neighborhoods like Spanish Harlem, and they themselves interacting and building social, religious, and political ties with African American Muslims. What do these specific histories tell us about the political, economic, and social conditions which not only set different groups of people in motion, but bring them into contact with one another and lay the ground for moments of interaction, solidarity, and exchange? And how are these moments structured and limited by gender and constricted by the same historical conjunctures and geographic locations that gave rise to them?

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 140 words || 
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4. Moravcsik, Andrew. and Sarotte, Mary. "Qualitative Social Science and the Historical Study of International Relations: Productive Overlap?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251556_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Social scientists using qualitative methods must defend their methodology to a disciplinary field that prioritizes quantitative work. Similarly, historians of diplomacy and international relations must defend not only their methodology but also their very choice of subject – political power – to a discipline that currently prefers to focus on social, cultural, environmental and gender-related issues. Despite their focus on similar questions, time periods, geographical regions, and leaders, there is surprisingly little interdisciplinary dialogue between these two beleaguered groups. This paper is an attempt to bridge the divide between them by pointing out explicit similarities in their approaches to the study of recent exercises in political power. The goal is to enhance and facilitate the qualitative study of political power by standardizing terms of methodological reference, clarifying areas of agreement and disagreement, and pointing out areas of potentially productive overlap.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 299 words || 
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5. "Overlapping Institutions in Agricultural Trade Governance: strategic implications for African states" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251142_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The accelerating development of international and transnational economic law tests the resources of even the most developed states. African states can barely manage participation in the institutions most vital to their interests. That states are both legal equals and unequal participants poses a central problem for contemporary global governance. This paper takes a bottom-up perspective by examining African states’ attempts to influence the development of international agricultural trade rules. Conventional wisdom points to the limited resources and capacities of African states. Governments in the developed world and international organizations are providing aid to target such resource constraints. However, this paper finds that such factors only partly explain levels of African state participation and success (or failure).This paper makes the argument that how institutions of global governance are organized around an issue affects the opportunities and constraints states face when they seek to influence the development of international rules and principles. While most analyses focus on a single institution, this paper considers the impact of multiple institutions on strategic rule-making and negotiation. Thus it matters that the set of international institutions relevant to agricultural trade, for example, is different from the sets of institutions relevant to intellectual property, foreign direct investment, or the management of refugee crises. For agricultural trade, the creation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) as the dominant provider of international trade rules and mechanisms for enforcement alter the context of regional and bilateral rule-making activities (African agreements with Europe in particular) as well as multilateral rule-making. Other legal instruments find themselves somewhat bound by WTO rules. This paper explores the argument by substantively focusing on African state experiences in the area of agricultural trade, with particular attention to rules for cotton and sugar. Legal analysis and in-depth interviews with participants in international rule-making inform the study.

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