Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 22 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5  - Next
2007 - The Law and Society Association Words: 60 words || 
Info
1. Buchanan, Neil. "What Do We Owe Future Generations?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, TBA, Berlin, Germany, Jul 24, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p177621_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: It is common in fiscal policy analysis to argue that current generations should not do anything which would decrease the economic prosperity that would otherwise be enjoyed by future generations. This paper explores the philosophical basis for that belief and asks whether there are any principled means by which we can balance the interests of current and future generations.

2010 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 513 words || 
Info
2. Fallahi, Mitra. "Owing the future through Action: A Fresh Look at Teacher Preparation Curriculum for Middle School teacher candidates." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Hilton, Chicago, IL, Feb 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p389651_index.html>
Publication Type: Single Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper focuses on how teacher education programs can be an advocate for teacher candidates interested in teaching in the middle school by developing a curriculum that is focused on developmental characteristics of middle schoolers and the elements of time that is influencing them. Those elements include the critical stage of development middle schoolers are in and the unique characteristics of the 21st century such as multi-media and technology that affect students’ learning. The proposed curriculum will be a fresh look at middle school curriculum as an independent credential for teaching in the middle school.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7561 words || 
Info
3. Zavisca, Jane. "To Owe is Not to Own: The Meaning of Mortgages in an Emerging Market in Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411762_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: : This study examines the cultural underpinnings of mortgages, and the potential for crisis to unravel them, through an analysis of attitudes toward mortgages in Russia. If in the West a mortgage provides a sense of ownership, in Russia it entails a state of debt bondage. Borrowers in mortgage cultures are misrecognized as owners, butRussians insist that the bank, not the borrower, owns the home. Whereas borrowing to buy a home is seen elsewhere a virtuous investment in comparison to credit cards, in Russia, a mortgage represents unconscionable hubris, while small-scale credit is banal. And if in the West interest payments on loans spanning decades are taken-for-granted conditions of ownership, Russians are outraged by the prospect of interest overpayments and deferred and uncertain future ownership of a good they consider to be a basic right. The cultural rejection of mortgages in Russia is based on the perception of permanent crisis and persistent expectations that the state, and not markets or individuals, is responsible for providing families with homes of their owns. This negative case of a mortgage market that could not emerge, in part due to cultural rejection of its premises, is provocative with respect to possible cultural shifts in the United States and other countries that may be precipitated by the ongoing credit crisis.

2013 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 572 words || 
Info
4. Voekel, Pamela. "What Do Professors Owe?: Public Funding, Private "Partnerships," and the Restructuring of the University" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p656793_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: In recent years, we have witnessed a massive enclosure of the educational commons. Nowhere is this truer than in Georgia, where segregationist-era bans vie with the newer initiatives of “post-racial America” conservatives to protect white supremacy. Recent changes to the state’s popular Hope Scholarship, formerly a need-based tuition waiver for all high school graduates with at least a 3.0 g.p.a., rendered only two percent of African American students eligible for the full award and freed the funds for disbursement to the wealthiest Georgians. Funded by the state’s overwhelmingly low-income lottery players, Hope has become a “color blind” way to rob Pedro to send Paul to school in a Lexus. Two years ago, the Board of Regents banned undocumented students from the state’s top research universities and voted to charge them out-of-state tuition at the less competitive colleges. By what means are immigrant and other workers turned into the takers when all of the mechanisms of wealth creation and revenue generation so unabashedly redistribute wealth upwards?
All public universities are privately and publically funded, and that creates a debt. Certainly the Right knows its masters voice when it hears it: in one spectacular example of managerial ideology masquerading as education, the philanthropic arm of the commercial bank BB&T has bought a place on curricula fro free-enterprise cult figure Ayn Rand on campuses around the South; at least one university saw no threat to its intellectual reputation when it agreed to teach Rand’s free-market potboiler Atlas Shrugged in order to seal the deal with the donor; another announced its intent to hand out this “best defense of capitalism ever written” to incoming business students. As University faculty, what debt do we owe to the students fenced out of the commons by declining public funding, metastasizing administration, rising tuition and fees, contracting financial aid, burgeoning student debt, and vicious segregationist laws?
How the givers become the takers, the “them” to our “us,” in right-wing cosmology is obviously too big a question to tackle in this conference paper; my concern is with the religious components of the process. As the state’s social welfare functions shrink, churches and families are asked to take up the slack, even become the mediators of citizenship and community belonging. In some parts of the state, undocumented immigrants pulled over for routine traffic violations are allowed to proceed if they can show a note from their—usually evangelical—pastor attesting to their church membership. This is no accident: for the past thirty years, evangelical churches have run missionary trips to Mexico—a perfect example of how U.S. imperial relations are forged through non-governmental channels (this brief section relies on the work of Hannah Waits). At the same time, Catholic immigrants in Atlanta march behind banners of Our Lady of Guadalupe to enact the traditional Christmas Posadas as visits to Civil Rights monuments in the City too Busy to Hate, sanctifying the merger of two radically liberationist religious movements.
In the paper’s later half, I take up the question of our debt as faculty members to those fenced out of the academy through an examination of Freedom University, an all-volunteer effort that relies on private donations to provide rigorous college courses to ALL Georgians. Do private initiatives like Freedom University or the recently opened Freedom School Mississippi divert energies from the fight for educational equality within the university or provide a utopian vision from which others can learn?

2016 - ARNOVA's 45th Annual Conference Words: 99 words || 
Info
5. McGiverin-Bohan, Kellie. "To Own or to Owe? Identifying How Nonprofit Organizations Decide to Use Debt to Fund Facilities and Other Capital Assets" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA's 45th Annual Conference, Hyatt Regency Washington, Washington, DC, Nov 17, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1155033_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Almost all nonprofit organizations must face a moment when the equipment and facilities necessary to fulfilling their missions entail expenses that exceed cash on hand; they must decide whether to take-on major debt. While substantial advances in nonprofit finance scholarship have demonstrated the importance of understanding nonprofit debt, many studies find that traditional finance theories (e.g., pecking order, static tradeoff, and agency) fall short in explaining why nonprofits choose particular capital structures. In response to these observations, this paper uses grounded theory to develop new testable propositions/theories for nonprofit finance, and explores the decision-making process as a causal mechanism.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5  - Next

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy