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2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 15296 words || 
Info
1. Ryan, Paul. "Exploring the emergence of democratic parenting through the pages of an Irish problem page, 1963-80" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p504561_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores how the discourse governing parenting in Ireland changed during the years 1963-80. Through an analysis of 645 letters and replies to prolific agony aunt Angela Macnamara, the paper reveals how a challenge to parental authority mirrored a shift in how children were valued in society. Children wrote to the column to complain of excessive parental control over restrictions to their personal freedom and over their choices in clothes, dating and music. Parents wrote distressed at the new challenges their children would face in a new world of greater affluence and sexual freedom. Parents were worried by their own incompetence in navigating their children through these new challenges. Some parents would rely on older methods of corporeal punishment to enforce parental control while others embraced newer a more democratic relationship with their children. Macnamara emerges as an arbiter who balances her own traditional views of families with new modes of emerging parenting. The paper draws on the work of Anthony Giddens in extending a concept of democracy between parents and children and Viviana Zelizer to explore the connections between the potential for democracy and the value placed on children by society.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 9796 words || 
Info
2. Cohen, Diana. "My Page is Bigger than your Page: A Comparative Examination of E-Campaign Functionality and Strategy of 2004 Senate Candidate and State Party Sites" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41705_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Technological advances often cause political change, with the Internet’s impact on political parties and Senate candidates being no exception. Using qualitative analysis, this paper explores how state parties and Senate candidates utilized the Web in electoral strategy during the 2004 election. Based on in-depth interviews with 26 Web-oriented staff members, this research presents an insightful perspective on what purposes the Internet served, what Web-based tools were found most effective, and what tools were purposefully avoided. This study finds four common goals of party and candidate Web sites: mobilizing existing supporters, getting the message out, empowering existing supporters, and soliciting contributions. State parties stressed “party as service” through facilitating collaboration between constituency groups and serving as a pathway between constituents and government, while candidates stressed intimidating the opponent and communicating with the media. Implications of these findings are discussed.

2009 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 149 words || 
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3. Vandenberg, Abby., Wulf, Timbre. and Brennan, Pauline. "“Wasted” on Page One: Depictions of Female Drug Offenders and Users in Front-Page Newspaper Stories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p390745_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examined the role that race/ethnicity played in media depictions of female drug offenders. Drug-offense specific stories and stories that discussed drug use/abuse within the context of some other offense were content analyzed. Few have considered how the media characterize female offenders, in general; hardly any have examined media portrayals of female drug offenders, in particular. Therefore, this study filled a void. We predicted that portrayals would be more favorable for white versus minority women. To test our expectation, we gathered front-page newspaper stories about female offenders from eight nationally available U.S. newspapers – the Chicago Tribune, the Houston Chronicle, the Los Angeles Times, the Miami Herald, the New York Times, the Omaha World Herald, the U.S.A. Today, and the Washington Post. Our content analysis of these stories revealed that minority female drug offenders/users were depicted more negatively than their white counterparts.

2015 - ASEEES Convention Words: 103 words || 
Info
4. Swain, Amanda. "A Blank Page or a Page of History? The Kalanta Monument in Kaunas, Lithuania" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1021575_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In 2002, on the 30th anniversary of his 1972 self-immolation, a monument to Romas Kalanta was unveiled in Kaunas, Lithuania. The flat stones along the edge of the park where Kalanta set himself on fire – representing the “burned pages of history” according to the artist – included no identifying marker. Although “R. Kalanta, 1953-1972” was added a few years later, a plaque explaining the monument was not installed until the 2012 40th anniversary. This paper analyzes how the anonymity of the monument and the debates over its installation and form reveal debates over how to remember Lithuania’s Soviet past.

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 274 words || 
Info
5. Ryan, Barbara. "Salmi, Lew, Eliza, Abraham: Page to Stage, Ben Hur" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105665_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As students of 1920s U.S. culture know, advertising executive Bruce Barton scored a publishing coup with a revisionary portrait of the man Christians recognize as the Son of God. Scholars such as James D. Hart and Warren Susman have acknowleged the vast appeal of "The Man Nobody Knows" (1925). Yet the most recent attention paid, that of religious historian Stephen Prothero, insists on the nationalist import of Barton's hero. "American Jesus" (2003) defends this claim with reference to fan mail. But because the archive utilized includes fan mail from non-U.S. readers in Europe, South America and scattered parts of the British Commonwealth, I ask scholars to view "Man" in a less statist way that takes full measure of fans' insistence that, under the right leadership, Barton's book could spark a worldwide revival of Christianity.
A meld of "history of reading" scholarship and theories of reception, my paper shows that enthusiasts may dream of large-scale mobilization with a 'change the world' agenda. Other readers may (and actually did) demur, however, when a work of creative expression is as controversial as "Man." Guiding my project are 'fan studies' theorists such as M. Hill and E. Doss and historians of reading such as J. Radway and M. de Certeau. My current book is a study of fan mail that includes a chapter on "Man." Early work on this project led to ASA papers in 2000 and 2002; another for the Society of the History of Authors, Readers and Publishers in 2001; and an essay in "Reading Acts: U.S. Readers' Interactions with Literature, 1800-1950" (Tennessee, 2002).

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