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2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 22 pages || Words: 5130 words || 
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1. Jumper, Rachel. "Parenting Style and Parent-Child Communication: Are there Differences between Parents of Gifted Adolescents and Parents of Non-Labeled Adolescents?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p257680_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This pilot study examined the differences between parenting styles of parents with gifted adolescents and non-labeled adolescents. Comparisons were made between parents of gifted and parents of non-labeled to examine if there are differences between the ways that these parents communicate with their children. Analysis revealed that parents of the gifted were more likely to verbally admonish their children, have a greater knowledge of school activities, and report that their children disclose more information to them than the parents of non-labeled children. Discussion focuses on specific characteristics of the gifted that may be responsible for these findings as well as the need for future studies examining differences between parent-child communications of gifted children.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Portnow, Sam., Hussain, Saida., Wilson, Melvin., Shaw, Daniel., Dishion, Thomas. and GARDNER, FRANCES. "Harsh Parenting and Parental School Involvement Predicting Differences Between Parent and Teacher Observations of Problem Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955781_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Differences between parents and teacher reports of observations of child problem behavior are common (De Los Reyes & Kazdin, 2005). Racial/ethnic group differences are frequently cited as predictors of differences between parent and teacher observations of child problem behavior, without an examination of their genesis (Lau, Garland, Yeh, McCabe, Wood, & Hough, 2004; Zimmerman, Khoury, Vega, Gill, & Warheit, 1995). In addition, socioeconomic status is a confound in past studies. Harsh parenting and a lack of parental involvement in school are associated with elevated rates of behavior problems in school (Hill et al., 2004; Simons, Whitbeck, Conger & Conger, 1991; Stormshak et al., 2000); African American and poor Hispanic parents report using harsh parenting practices more often than Caucasian parents (Cardona, Nicholson, & Fox, 2000; Laosa, 1980; McLoyd, 1990), and poor African American and Hispanic parents report less school involvement than middle class Caucasian parents (Lee & Bowen, 2006). Thus, harsh parenting and a lack of parental involvement in school may underlie differences in parent and teacher ratings of child problem behavior. We hypothesized that greater harsh parenting and less parental involvement in school would predict teacher reports of more problem behavior than parents, and that these effects would exist across racial and ethnic groups.
The present study used measures of harsh parenting in early childhood (ages 2 through 5) and measures of parental involvement in school at ages 7.5 through 9.5 to predict differences between parents and teachers observations of children’s problem behavior at ages 7.5 through 9.5 in a low-income (66% with annual income below $20,000), ethnically diverse (28% African American, 13% Hispanic) sample. The sample for the current study included 526 African American (N=163), Caucasian (N=313), and Hispanic (N=50) families who were participants in the Early Steps Multisite Study, a randomized clinical trial to investigate the efficacy of the Family Check-Up in preventing the development of problem behavior in early childhood.
Our hypotheses were partially supported. As shown in Figure 1, in a model that included all families, observed harsh parenting at ages 2 to 5 is related to teachers observing more behavior problems than parents, whereas using parent reports, harsh parenting predicted parents observing more behavior problems than teachers. In addition, teacher-reported lack of parental involvement in school predicted teachers observing more behavior problems than parents. Partitioning the model into racial/ethnic groups, results indicated that observed and self-reported harsh parenting predicts differences in parent and teacher observations of problem behavior only for Caucasian and Hispanic families, whereas teacher-reported lack of parental involvement in school predicts differences in parent and teacher observations of problem behavior only for African American and Hispanic families. Recommendations and strategies for reducing differences between parent and teacher observations will be discussed.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Harmon, Bethany., Diaz, Guadalupe., Hatfield, Bridget., Rennekamp, Denise. and Sektnan, Michaella. "Perceptions of Parenting Knowledge and Behaviors: Latino Parents in Parenting Education Programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955966_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The influence of positive and effective parenting skills on children’s developmental outcomes has been well established (Brooks-Gunn & Markman, 2005; Carter & Kahn, 1996; Debord & Matta, 2002), and parenting education programs (PEPs) are a promising mechanism to improve parenting skills and promote positive, effective parenting (Family Strengthening Policy Center, 2007; Moore, Caal, Rojas & Lawner, 2014). However, less research has focused on the influence of these programs for Latino parents, who generally face additional barriers to access community resources and programs (Moreno & Valencia, 1999; Olivos, 2006). The present study employed quantitative and qualitative methodologies to investigate three research questions: 1) What are the background characteristics of Latino parents who participate in PEP in rural Oregon? 2) How does participating in a PEP influence parents’ perceptions of their parenting knowledge and behaviors? 3) How does participating in a PEP influence parents’ perceptions of their child’s behaviors?
Sixteen self-identified Latino parents were recruited by organizations implementing multiple week community-based parenting education programs in rural Oregon to participate in a focus group six months after completing a PEP in Spanish. The focus groups were facilitated in Spanish, lasted about one hour, and included questions such as: “How did these classes help you as parents?” and “Have you changed any of your parenting strategies because of these classes?” Recordings of the focus groups were transcribed and double-coded in Spanish by the two first authors. Parents completed a background questionnaire (e.g., formal education, age, gender, employment status, and access to community resources). Parents also reported on their parenting knowledge, parenting behaviors, and their child’s behaviors (0-5 scale).
Results for research question 1 are presented in Table 1. Education levels ranged from less than high school to graduate degrees; parents reported accessing a wide variety of community resources. For research question two, Latino parents perceived positive and helpful changes in their families six months after their participation in the PEP and continued to implement the knowledge from the PEP at home (M = 4.18; SD = 0.96). Participants rated their parenting knowledge (M = 4.13; SD = 0.55) and their parenting behaviors (M = 4.11; SD = 0.64) highly. The findings regarding parent’s knowledge and behaviors were echoed in the focus groups. Several parents described changes in their communication style, discipline strategies, school readiness, and family health activities (see Table 2). Results for research question three indicated that parents also reported seeing positive changes in their child’s behavior at home and at school (M = 4.20; SD = 1.08) six months after the PEP. One parent stated, “I see differences in the way that my child behaves at school and home, with his relationship with his teacher and his siblings.” These findings suggest that Latino parents’ participation in PEP may serve as a pathway to improve their access to community resources and promote parenting knowledge and behaviors to improve the well being of their children.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 498 words || 
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4. Esteraich, Jan., Raikes, Helen. and Iruka, Iheoma. "Parenting Profiles: Using a Person-centered Approach to Examine Patterns of Parenting in Early Head Start Parents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962472_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Young children experience their world as an environment of relationships, with the most fundamental relationship with his/her parents. The nature and context of the interactions between the parent and child during the early years has important implications for the child’s future development. Persistent parenting behaviors, such as sensitive and responsive caregiving (Bradley, Corwyn, Burchinal, McAdoo, & Coll, 2001; Stams, Juffer, & Van IJzendoorn, 2002; Tamis-LeMonda, Bornstein, & Baumwell, 2001) and choice of discipline strategies (Berlin et al., 2009; Lee, Altschul, & Gershoff, 2013;) are among the most consistent key factors in the prediction of later child competences.

Given the critical importance of parenting processes, many organizations offer parenting programs to support families. Several parenting programs empirically have shown positive outcomes for parents and children, as well as improvements in parenting influential behaviors (Administration for Children and Families 2002b; Beauchaine, Webster-Stratton, & Reid, 2005; Love, Tarullo, Raikes, & Chazan-Cohen, 2006; Sanders, Baker, & Turner, 2012).

However, a program’s services may work better for some parents than others. An uneven match of services-to-needs may be due to the tremendous variability in parenting practices. A step in the direction of more systematically addressing variation is by identifying a small number of sub-groups within the overall group. Individuals in each subgroup practice similar parenting behaviors and share similar strengths and needs. The program then can tailor core services to the specific dimensions of these subgroups, providing a better ‘fit’ for the individuals receiving the services.

The current study examined grouping patterns of parenting indicators in a low income-sample, using a person-oriented approach. Data were utilized from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project (EHSREP; 1996-2010). A subset of the data that included parent interviews and video-taped parent-child observations when child was 36 months old, was examined (n=2,121). Four parent behavior indicators and two context indicators were selected to define the profile groupings: parent supportiveness, frequency of shared bookreading, parent-child activities; type of discipline; parent distress and family conflict. While many parent behaviors are linked to specific developmental outcomes (Bornstein & Tamis-LeMonda, 1989), these indicators were selected because of their fundamental, theoretical and practical importance to children’s developmental outcomes, and evidence that the behaviors and contexts were modifiable through intervention. The six indicators were examined using latent profile analysis.

Four distinct parenting profiles emerged: supportive (38%), engaged but punitive (38%), disengaged and punitive (14%), and disengaged (11%). Two profiles were more supportive of children’s early development (76% of the sample) and two profiles were less supportive (24% of the sample). The profiles are described and analyzed. Analysis of demographics, parent, and child characteristics to determine prediction into profile membership will be conducted and included in the symposium presentation.

The results suggest that within what otherwise may be considered a homogeneous population, subgroups of parents with similar parenting patterns exist. These distinct parenting profiles found in the Early Head Start program may help similar programs identify families who share these profiles and tailor their services to better match the needs of these families.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 7052 words || 
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5. Downing-Tsushima, Teresa. "Parents’ Perceptions of their Adolescent Children, Parental Resources, and Satisfaction in the Parent Role" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105403_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Parental satisfaction has important implications for parents’ psychological and physical wellbeing and for their treatment of their children. However, scant research has been devoted to understanding the factors that predict satisfaction in the parent role, particularly among parents with adolescent children. Drawing on identity theory, and using a nationally representative dataset of U.S. adolescents, this paper addresses this gap in the literature by exploring the relationship between parental satisfaction and parents’ perceptions of their adolescents’ behavioral and value-laden characteristics, taking into account parental resources. The results suggest that parents’ perceptions of their adolescents’ more global characteristics--including trustworthiness, understandability, temper, and quality of life—mediates the relationship between parental satisfaction and parents’ perceptions of their adolescents’ (problem) behaviors, including their use of illicit substances, getting expelled from school, and engaging in delinquency. For the most part, parental resources do not moderate the relationship between parents’ perceptions of their children’s problem-behaviors and parental satisfaction. The implications of these findings for an identity theory perspective on role-based satisfaction are discussed.

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