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2015 - National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference Words: 189 words || 
Info
1. Germain, Felix. "“Black Paris or Blacks in Paris? African and Caribbean Experiences in the Postwar Period (1946-1974)”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference, The Westin Los Angeles Airport Hotel, Los Angeles, California, <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p993400_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: During the postwar period, thousands of students and workers from the Caribbean and sub-Saharan Africa migrated to Paris. These individuals hardly made up a homogeneous community, as citizenship, gender, ethnicity, and class differences erected barriers between them. This paper focuses on the heterogeneity of the African diaspora in France during the postwar period.

The first part examines the intersection between citizenship and activism among Caribbean and African students. Caribbean students had recently become full French citizens in 1946, but African students worked actively to obtain independence from France. These two separate goals created a major gap between African and Caribbean students, which is still noticeable in contemporary Paris. The second part of the paper examines the intersection between citizenship and the social insertion of Caribbean and African workers into the fabrics of Parisian society. I argue that French citizenship did not guarantee successful integration into France. In fact, I offer a series of evidence demonstrating that migrating to France was more rewarding to sub-Saharan African than the Caribbean migrants who supposedly benefited from French citizenship. I conclude the paper by assessing how these disparate experiences influenced Pan-Africanism in postwar France.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8168 words || 
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2. Dung, Yun-An. and Reijnders, Stijn. "Paris Off Screen: Analyzing the Chinese Tourist Experience of Cinematic Paris" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p549979_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article examines from a European-Asian perspective the relationship between media representations and the tourist imagination. We use the case of Chinese tourists in Paris to investigate how Asian tourists imagine Europe, and how these imaginations are being realized, challenged, and modified during concrete tourist experiences. Drawing on an online survey, field observations and semi-structured interviews with tourists, this paper shows how the Asian imagination of Europe is strongly influenced by popular representations from the media. Moreover, the Chinese tourist experience of Paris turns out be characterised by an ongoing negotiation between media-inspired fantasies and personal experiences of the ‘real’ Paris. Consequently, the way that the Chinese imagine Europe to be is reinforced but also challenged. Chinese tourists tend to develop a hybrid perspective: they learn to re-appreciate Paris in its complexity, while at the same time re-constituting their own Asian identity vis-à-vis the European Other.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 147 words || 
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3. Oosterhoff, Richard. "Learned Travel to and from Paris circa 1500: Arts Faculty at the University of Paris" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481156_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the late fifteenth century, when the Paris arts professor Lefèvre d'Etaples journeyed three times to Italy and through the Rhineland, the scholarly life was also a mobile one. His students traveled too, through Italy, Germany, and Spain. And travel went in the other direction, as when Pico della Mirandola came to Paris in 1485. Sometimes this group journeyed as bookfinders, or booksellers; sometimes they were on ambassadorial business, for bishop or king. Occasionally they found funds to travel simply for the sake of learning. Was this the peripatetic life of a medieval scholar, or did such travels help shape new views of the scholar — as when Lefèvre was compared to Pythagoras for traveling to Italy for intellectual reasons? This paper looks at what such travels meant for French arts masters, with an eye to how learned travel fostered scholarlycommunities, shaping the geography of philosophical polemic.

2015 - National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference Words: 207 words || 
Info
4. Adair, Zakiya. "“La Joie de Paris: Black French Women, Performance, Gender and Nation in Paris 1920-1935"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference, The Westin Los Angeles Airport Hotel, Los Angeles, California, <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p993397_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: Artistic creations, performances, and the artists who produce them have played central roles in the communication and reinforcement of national identities and their accompanying racial categories. Prior to Josephine Baker’s landmark 1925 Parisian debut in La Revue Negre, several black French women were regularly featured in cabaret and musical hall. This presentation is concerned with delineating the reasons for the rise in popularity and use of black Americans on the Parisian stage and subsequent decrease of black French women as performers in early expressive culture.

My presentation proposes new approaches to colonialism and black internationalism by considering the varied experiences of black American women and black French women who were performers in Paris during the early twentieth century. I will explore the significance of the lives and performances of Aisha Goblet and D’al-Al, two minor but popular black French performers in the early 1920s. The two women were French, one born and raised in France, the other from Martinique. I argue that the performative strategies of black French women and black American women demonstrate racialized gender constructions within the genre of cabaret and musical hall in France in the early 1920s. Additionally, I argue that women’s bodies were mapped along French Colonial imaginings of race and empire.

2015 - National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference Words: 187 words || 
Info
5. Germain, Felix. "Black Paris or Blacks in Paris? African and Caribbean Experiences in the Postwar Period (" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference, The Westin Los Angeles Airport Hotel, Los Angeles, California, Mar 11, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p979758_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: During the postwar period thousands of students and workers from the Caribbean and sub-Saharan Africa migrated to Paris. These individuals hardly made up a homogeneous community, as citizenship, gender, ethnicity, and class differences erected barriers between them. This paper focuses on the heterogeneity of the African diaspora in France during the postwar period. The first part examines the intersection between citizenship and activism among Caribbean and African students. Caribbean students had recently become full French citizen in 1946, but African students worked actively to obtain independence from France. These two separate goals created a major gap between African and Caribbean students, which is still noticeable in contemporary Paris.
The second part of the paper examines the intersection between citizenship and social insertion among Caribbean and African workers. I argue that French citizenship did not guarantee successful integration into the fabrics of French society. In fact, I offer a series of evidence demonstrating that migrating to France was more rewarding to sub-Saharan African than the Caribbean migrants who supposedly benefited from French citizenship. I conclude the paper by assessing how these disparate experiences influenced Pan-Africanism in postwar France.

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