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2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 164 words || 
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1. Schill, Dan. "Parodying a Parody: Framing, Satire, Partisanship and Fox News' The Half Hour News Hour." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424106_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Is there politically conservative satire? Conservatives such as Bob Dole, George Will, and William F. Buckley, Jr. are known for their wit, but they are a far cry from broad satirists such as Jon Stewart or Stephen Colbert. To address this question, this paper examines The Half Hour News Hour, a news satire program that aired on the Fox News Channel from February to September 2007. This program's mix of skits, mock news segments, and stand-up comedy bits raises new issues about the relationships among satire, framing, and partisanship. On its face, the show appears to be a parody of mainstream news programs; however, the show is best understood not as a parody of liberal-leaning news, but as a parody of The Daily Show itself -- a parody of a parody. The show ultimately fails because a well constructed parody can only be satirized with great sophistication and nuance -- two qualities The Half Hour News Hour obviously lacked.

2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 30 pages || Words: 9201 words || 
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2. Bratslavsky, Lauren. "Television representing television: How NBC’s 30 Rock parodies and satirizes the culture industry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p272712_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Television sitcoms offer a wealth of representations of culture. Of interest is the representation of the workplace, specifically, working in the television industry. An important component to television comedy as well as representation are two humor devices—satire and parody. Using the culture industry, the circuit of culture framework, and humor techniques, this paper analyzes the NBC sitcom, 30 Rock, for its representation of the television industry, the production of culture, and the culture of production.

2008 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 371 words || 
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3. Rahmawati, Liana. "Republic Mimpi: Parodies and Political Engagement in Indonesia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 13, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p276747_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Republik Mimpi (literally mean “The Ideal Republic”) pioneered the first televised political parody in Indonesia. Though politically incorrect jokes and parodies have been a constant discussion in every dining room, office cube, coffee shop, and recently blog and web forum, Republik Mimpi attempt to articulate them further into a valid discourse on how to criticize, aspire and also give hope to the government of Republic of Indonesian in doing its mandate. Famous for impersonating the nation’s political authorities and figures—such as Si Butet Yogya as Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (interplaying the acronym of the current Indonesia president), Jarwo Kuat as Jusuf Kalla, Gus Pur as Gus Dur, Habudi as Habibie, Soeharta as Soeharto, and Megawati as Megakarti—the show continues to garner more fans especially students to attend the taping, and leading authorities and pundit interested as its guests. Its vernacular wits and cheeky references make the political topics at hand easier to digest and understand. Broadcasted by the 24-hours news television station, METRO TV, it is now considered one of the most influential show in the country. Many have argued that the show has underscored the pretentious bureaucratic culture in Indonesia and thus created a forum for Indonesians to express their opinion openly. Furthermore, its recent clashes with its own sponsor, H.M Sampoerna, the largest tobacco company in Indonesia and with former Minister of Communication and Information under Megawati’s administrator have enhanced the show’s credential and popularity as the foremost advocate for free speech. Yet, some critics have argued that the show undermined the credibility and accountability of Indonesian political system. It does not offer a real solution just quick fix entertainment. Most charged that the show itself is a profit seeker institution. Its main producer and originator, Effendi Ghazali, is also well-know political operative in Indonesian politics, sometime commissioned by certain candidates to run their communication campaign. This paper, thus, tries to examine how effective parodied show in articulating political issues and subject. Does the viewer perceive it as a legitimate source of political news? How much is the attention span of political discussion carries out in real life --meaning do viewers engage more politically after seeing the show? What is exactly the main purpose of these parodies?

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5145 words || 
Info
4. Arford, Tammi. "Performativity, Parody, and Possibilities: Gender in the Context of Women's Prisons" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411471_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will examine the gender performances of women in prison through the lens of Butler's concept of performativity. Incarcerated women’s gender performances simultaneously, and paradoxically, call into question and reinforce heteronormative gender norms. The regulatory forces at work within the prison context both provide an opportunity for gender subversion and restrict the possibilities for understandings of gender beyond the heteronormative. I will provide a brief overview of Butler's theories of performativity and gender performance, and examine the possibilities for gender subversion within the prison environment.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 355 words || 
Info
5. Sandahl, Carrie. and Nudd, Donna. "Keeping It Real: Balancing Critique with Comedy in Disability Parody" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p366735_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Comic violence against characters with disabilities has been a stock Hollywood device to elicit laughs since film’s earliest days. Film historian Martin Norden has termed the disabled character who is always the brunt of the joke, “The Comic Misadventurer.” Though this character type remains a mainstay in Hollywood film, the contemporary Comic Misadventurer takes a beating for more than mere laughs. Instead, he or she more often serves as a barometer that measures the other characters’ moral character. For example, in There’s Something About Mary, Mary measures her suitors’ worthiness by their responses to acts of comic violence against her cognitively impaired brother. InTropic Thunder, the character Simple Jack is a non-disabled actor specializing in “retard” roles for acting accolades. Both of these films drew the ire of disability rights communities who accused the filmmakers of crossing the line of representational violence into real violence—or hate speech—against disabled people in these portrayals. The filmmakers replied that they were “equal opportunity offenders,” that people from a variety of minority groups were also targets, and that the activists were humorless and entirely missed the social messages inherent in their parodies.

But are disabled activists humorless and politically correct to the point of misunderstanding representations made in their own interests?

Disability activist comedy (otherwise known as “crip humor”) is replete with their own versions of the Comic Misadventurer. For example, Mickee Faust’s Gimp Parade is a collection of vicious short comedies in which disabled people are blown up, euthanized, and abused in ways too many to count. Like other contemporary versions of the Comic Misadeventurer, Faust uses comic violence parodically to comment on non-disabled peoples’ morality. But Carrie Sandahl and Donna Marie Nudd claim that Faust does it to point to the actual violence people with disabilities encounter in their social world: euthanasia, verbal abuse, infantalization, and medicalization. In addition, the authors discuss the ways that Mickee Faust’s “ethic of accommodation” serves as a comic, creative corrective; in other words, they discuss the complicated and spirited ways that company members, with and without disabilities, negotiate what is or is not “offensive” disability humor.

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