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2016 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 101 words || 
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1. Hodes, Caroline. "Fish, Land, Locke and Law: “Part of our Make-up…Part of our Self…Part of our Being”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Palais des congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Nov 10, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1138878_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will problematize the rules in Canadian anti-discrimination claims. In equality rights litigation, iterations of belonging are circumscribed by legal tests that define identity as a set of immutable, embodied characteristics. In this context, both litigants and interveners are expected to identify in ways that individualize the structural and systemic violence of dispossession. Following Eve Tuck and Wayne Yang’s (2012) assertion that “decolonization is not a metaphor”, this paper proposes that feminist sociolegal scholarship ought to rethink notions of identity, inclusion, recognition, the human and the extra-human in order to untether corporeality from the logic of settler colonial modernity.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 89 words || 
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2. Phillips, Ryan., Minor, Kevin. and Tilley, Jennifer. "Is Part of the Cure Part of the Disease? A Content Analysis of Arbitrariness Inducement in Capital Juror Sentencing Instructions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1145237_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: For over four decades, considerable debate has fulminated over arbitrariness in capital punishment. Despite the Supreme Court’s faith in Gregg that reformed statutes sufficiently dealt with the issue, capital punishment has remained largely arbitrary ever since. However, little research has scrutinized jury instructions, which are ostensibly meant to iron out arbitrariness, as a potential source. We content analyze jury instructions from 26 states to study the extent to which these directives invite or guard against capricious outcomes in capital sentencing decisions. Policy implications of the analysis are considered.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12967 words || 
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3. Fullerton, Andrew., Dixon, Jeffrey. and McCollum, Destinee. "The Institutionalization of Part-Time Work: Cross-National Differences in the Relationship between Part-Time Work and Perceived Insecurity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726277_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The global rise of non-standard employment is often cited as one of the most important reasons for increasing levels of insecurity over the last 40 years. Yet, non-standard work is also one of the most underdeveloped factors in the literature on perceived worker insecurity. In this paper, we seek to understand the relationship between the most common form of non-standard employment, part-time work, and perceived worker insecurity. We focus on three types of perceived worker insecurity: cognitive job insecurity (perceived likelihood of job loss), labor market insecurity (perceived difficulty of finding a new, comparable job), and affective job insecurity (worrying about the potential threat of job loss). We develop a model of the “institutionalization of part-time work” and test this model using individual-level data for male and female workers from the 2005 ISSP linked to country-level data on various labor market characteristics. At the individual level, the results indicate that part-time work is generally associated with greater cognitive job insecurity for men; less labor market insecurity for men; and, less affective job insecurity for both genders. At the country level, the size of the part-time workforce is not associated with average levels of cognitive job insecurity, but it is generally associated with lower average levels of affective job insecurity, and to a lesser extent, labor market insecurity. Additionally, the size of the part-time workforce has a stronger effect for women than men. Finally, individual-level part-time work interacts significantly with several country-level indicators of flexible work and other labor market characteristics.

2019 - American Sociological Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Pech, Corey., Klainot-Hess, Elizabeth. and Norris, Davon. "Part-time by Gender, not Choice: Involuntary Part-time Hours and the Gender Pay Gap" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton New York Midtown & Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, New York City, Aug 09, 2019 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1515249_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social scientists have studied gender wage inequality for decades. However, for most workers, pay is determined by wages multiplied by hours worked. In the contemporary economy, workers are increasingly working part time, not by choice, but at their employers’ discretion, creating an important and understudied axis of stratification in labor markets. Because women are disproportionately represented in involuntary part-time employment and may have less scheduling control than their male counterparts, involuntary part-time work may be a contributor to the economic devaluation of women. This article evaluates how well current theories of the gender wage gap apply to the gender gap in involuntary part-time work. We test comparable worth and care work penalty theories. Using Current Population Survey data, we find that neither the comparable worth nor care work penalty literature satisfactorily explains the gender gap in involuntary part-time work. Additionally, contrary to established notions of gender economic devaluation, we find men and Whites are more strongly penalized by female occupational representation than women and racial/ethnic minorities. These findings suggest we must move beyond a gender wage gap and toward a more fully theorized gender pay gap incorporating wages and hours worked.

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