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2016 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 200 words || 
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1. Watanabe, Chika. "“Shinto Ecology” for Development Aid: Making the Particular Universal, and the Universal Particular" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1073545_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The aid workers in the Japanese NGO, the Organization for Industrial, Spiritual and Cultural Advancement (OISCA), often feel compelled to obscure the organization’s roots in a Shinto-based new religion for fear of being called “cultish.” They state that their sustainable development and environmental work around Asia is “nonreligious,” neither religious nor secular, and instead, within a framework of what they envision as a Japanese ethic of Shinto ecology. Appealing to ideas of “living in harmony with nature” and “oneness with the universe,” OISCA’s aid workers attribute a universality to supposedly “Japanese” values by, first, linking Shinto with global environmental discourses, and second, translating these values as general ethics for becoming better persons. In this paper I examine how claims to be “nonreligious,” transcending the categories of religion and secularism, allow people to make the particular universal, and vice versa. An important point here is that this conceptual move is never clear or settled, and the ambiguities of this vision in fact constitute the moral imagination. This case raises the larger question of how the boundary-work of defining Shinto and what it is not—and the uncertainties of such an endeavor—might already serve the practices and politics of the people we study.

2007 - The Law and Society Association Words: 232 words || 
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2. Cebada, Alicia. "Reinforcement of Accountability within the International Legal Order, in Particular the Role of Non-Governmental Organizations, Individuals, and Monitoring Bodies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, TBA, Berlin, Germany, Jul 24, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p182418_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: International rules are being internalized by different actors. Among these actors we find individuals. Even though the individual lacks a general capacity to claim against the States, this capacity has been developed within particular frameworks. On the other hand the individual can exert a concrete influence over the States, in the political sphere, in order to force them to comply with international rules. It could be said that the humanization of international law leads to the internalization of international rules by the individuals, which are, on their part, in condition to require the States, in the political field, to abide by International law.

The international rules are being internalized by domestic tribunals as well. The tribunals might play an important role in assuring that their States act in accordance with International rules. As the recent experience in United States demonstrates, the existence of international rules is not taken into consideration only by the Executive Powers; on the contrary the judicial as well as the legislative powers might require the State to comply fully with international rules.

Directly related to accountability is the operation of Treaty monitoring bodies. The openness of these bodies (Committees) to the non governmental organizations is being crucial with a view to improve the effectiveness of their supervision. And finally, am particularly interested in analyzing the role of NGOs with regard to the supervision of compliance with international law.

2007 - The Law and Society Association Words: 177 words || 
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3. Jacobsson, Kerstin. and Johansson, Hakan. "Particular Needs Meet Universal Welfare Norms: The OMC on Social Inclusion in Sweden" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, TBA, Berlin, Germany, Jul 25, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p175950_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper studies the reception and the micro-politics of the Open Method of Co-Ordination (OMC) on social inclusion in Sweden. While this OMC has had limited direct influence on the policy contents of national reforms, this paper demonstrates that the OMC on social inclusion has had impact on the relationships between national Ministries and social NGOs, as well as the relationships between social NGOs. First, we analyze how the enactment of the OMC on social inclusion has contributed to new forms of institutionalized consultation and co-operation between Ministries and social NGOs. Second, we analyze how this OMC has contributed to new patterns of co-operation and/or conflict between social NGOs, institutionalized in networks or loose affiliations. The paper pays special attention to the tensions, conflicts, difficulties, passiveness or even resistance provoked by the OMC social inclusion on actor relationships. Hence, the paper contributes to the general knowledge about the tensions inherent in the OMC social inclusion as such, as well as to the specific understanding of what factors hamper a successful implementation of OMCs in the Swedish context.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 5914 words || 
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4. Pozas-Loyo, Andrea. "The Veil of Particular Ignorance and General Omniscience An Epistemic Critique to Rawls? Theory of Justice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85664_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I present an epistemic critique of Rawls? deduction of the principles of justice. I argue that the fact that normative political theories are embedded in an evolving theoretical knowledge takes away the hope for deductivity.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 146 words || 
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5. Pare, Paul-Philippe. and Felson, Richard. "Are Victims of Domestic and Sexual Assault Particularly Dissatisfied with their Treatment by the Police and the Courts?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, Nov 15, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p31950_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: We examine whether victims of domestic violence and sexual assault are more dissatisfied with how their case is handled by the police than other victims of violent crime, and if so, why. We also examine their dissatisfaction with the courts. Analyzes of the National Violence Against Women Survey reveal that victims are more dissatisfied with the police when the offender is someone they know than when the offender is a stranger, regardless of gender and regardless of whether the offender is a family member or intimate partner. Victims who know the offender are more likely to complain that the police were too lenient and that the police did not believe them. Victims of sexual assault are more likely than victims of physical assault to be dissatisfied with the police and the courts. They complain more about police insensitivity, but this complaint disappears in the 1990s.

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