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2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 165 words || 
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1. Siller, Laura. and Cudmore, Rebecca. "Police Response to Intimate Partner Violence Calls for Service Over-Time: Is There a Difference in the Pattern of Arrests among Same-Sex Partners and Heterosexual Partners?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1030043_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Despite drastic changes in equality for same-sex couples, little attention to issues other than marriage equality has been paid in the empirical literature. One area that is in need of additional inquiry is the literature on same-sex intimate partner violence. Despite a wealth of literature on intimate partner violence among heterosexual couples, there is a dearth of literature on same-sex intimate partner violence. The absence of literature on same-sex intimate partner violence is concerning particularly in light of the fact that states can tailor domestic violence statutes in ways that exclude same-sex couples and in doing so create unequal treatment by law enforcement when they respond to domestic violence calls for service. Using data from the National Incident Based Reporting System database from 2000 to 2012, this study aims to explore whether similar cases involving same-sex and heterosexual couples result in similar police responses over-time. The aim is to assess whether the social equality impacting same-sex couples has translated to equitable treatment by law enforcement.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 180 words || 
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2. Drakulich, Kevin. and Rose, Kristin. "Sex Differences in Fear for Self and Partners: An Examination Using Same- and Opposite-Sex Partners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p577839_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Prior work has revealed that while women express higher levels of fear of crime the men, men express higher levels of fear for female partners than females do for their male partners (Warr and Ellison 2000; Snedker 2006; Rader 2009). Drawing on prior work, we develop several possible explanations for this phenomenon, including gender role socialization, the shadow of sexual assault, and a finite capacity for total fear. The present work explores these explanations using a large survey of residents from a city with a sizeable gay, lesbian, and bisexual population. The results reveal no differences between same- and opposite-sex couples in fear for oneself or one’s partner. Instead, having a female partner appears to inspire the highest levels of fear for partners regardless of sexual orientation. Those with male partners, on the other hand, have higher levels of fear for themselves, especially among female respondents. Differences in the role of personal and familial victimization by acquaintances and strangers are also explored. Implications for work on fear, gender, and sexual orientation are discussed.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 195 words || 
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3. Hayes, Brittany. and Kopp, Phillip. "Stalking Patterns Between Intimate and Non-Intimate Partners: Results from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1272581_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The project examined the associations between victim-offender relationships and lifetime experience of intimate partner abuse with stalking and stalking duration. Data from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey was analyzed. The first logistic regression assessed if lifetime experience of physically aggressive, physically violent, or coercively controlling behaviors by an intimate partner were associated with lifetime stalking experience (N= 10,233). The final two analyses, limited to stalking victims, estimated if ever having a perpetrator that was an intimate partner at both the first and last victimization and if ever having an intimate partner stalker increased the likelihood of stalking lasting more than year (N=3,084). Experience of physical violence (O.R.= 2.29, p < 0.001), physical aggression (O.R. = 1.67, p < 0.001), and coercive control (OR= 2.01, p < 0.001) by an intimate partner were associated with stalking. Respondents who had been stalked by an intimate partner were more likely to report stalking lasting over a year (OR= 2.13, p < 0.001). Experience of intimate partner abuse is associated with lifetime experience of stalking, suggesting overlap between these two behaviors. Among a nationally representative sample, victim-offender relationship remains a significant correlate of stalking duration.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 211 words || 
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4. Michaud, Nelson. "Jean Chrétien's Canada in the World: How Reliable this Partner Was? How Relaible this Partner Will Be?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253104_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Jean Chrétien came to power, in 1993, after a campaign during which he advocated that his foreign policy would be quite different from Brian Mulroney’s. Indeed, under Chrétien’s leadership, Canada’s role and influence declined sharply as tensions between Ottawa and Washington grew. When asked to support President Bush’s war against Iraq, Canada turned down the invitation although it had accepted to be involved in the solving of the Kosovo crisis. Why did the Chrétien government offer two different answers to these two international challenges? What role did the domestic values play in the framing of each of the answers given? What weight did international factors play? Was the government simply inconsistent or were the two answers reflecting a same logic that was applied to sharply different situations? Through the analysis of official responses given by key government spokespersons (Prime Minister, Minister of Defence, and Minister of Foreign Affairs) we will be able to determine what were the key factors evoked and establish if Canadian foreign policy is based on continuity or if it is crafted on an ad hoc basis to answer each case it faces. The answer this research provides will help us predict if Canada is a reliable partner or if its stance varies to answer domestic political pressures.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 68 pages || Words: 15815 words || 
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5. Teitelbaum, Emmanuel. "Partners in Production or Partners in Crime? Unions, Political Parties, and Industrial Conflict in South Asia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p59664_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An important question for developing countries is whether labor unions help or hinder economic development. What little has been written on the relationship between union behavior and economic development in South Asia a) fails to distinguish between unions affiliated to major parties (politically incorporated unions) and unincorporated unions and b) fails to grasp the importance of extreme and violent protest behavior for economic outcomes. This paper aims to overcome these deficits by examining how violent forms of protest affect economic development and by providing a political explanation of why some unions resort to militant protest behavior instead of relying on moderate levels of routine protest and institutionalized forms of grievance resolution to pursue their demands.

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