Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,709 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 342 - Next  Jump:
2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 165 words || 
Info
1. Siller, Laura. and Cudmore, Rebecca. "Police Response to Intimate Partner Violence Calls for Service Over-Time: Is There a Difference in the Pattern of Arrests among Same-Sex Partners and Heterosexual Partners?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1030043_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Despite drastic changes in equality for same-sex couples, little attention to issues other than marriage equality has been paid in the empirical literature. One area that is in need of additional inquiry is the literature on same-sex intimate partner violence. Despite a wealth of literature on intimate partner violence among heterosexual couples, there is a dearth of literature on same-sex intimate partner violence. The absence of literature on same-sex intimate partner violence is concerning particularly in light of the fact that states can tailor domestic violence statutes in ways that exclude same-sex couples and in doing so create unequal treatment by law enforcement when they respond to domestic violence calls for service. Using data from the National Incident Based Reporting System database from 2000 to 2012, this study aims to explore whether similar cases involving same-sex and heterosexual couples result in similar police responses over-time. The aim is to assess whether the social equality impacting same-sex couples has translated to equitable treatment by law enforcement.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 68 pages || Words: 15815 words || 
Info
2. Teitelbaum, Emmanuel. "Partners in Production or Partners in Crime? Unions, Political Parties, and Industrial Conflict in South Asia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p59664_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An important question for developing countries is whether labor unions help or hinder economic development. What little has been written on the relationship between union behavior and economic development in South Asia a) fails to distinguish between unions affiliated to major parties (politically incorporated unions) and unincorporated unions and b) fails to grasp the importance of extreme and violent protest behavior for economic outcomes. This paper aims to overcome these deficits by examining how violent forms of protest affect economic development and by providing a political explanation of why some unions resort to militant protest behavior instead of relying on moderate levels of routine protest and institutionalized forms of grievance resolution to pursue their demands.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 199 words || 
Info
3. Jaquier, Veronique. and Sullivan, Tami. "Fear of Partner in Past Relationships, Current Partner Violence, Mental Health and Substance Use" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516946_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a major criminal justice concern that has strong implications for the mental health of women victims. Among IPV-exposed women, fear has been studied as a major means of control and an important predictor of help-seeking. Further, IPV-exposed women experience a high level of posttraumatic stress, depression, and substance use. Yet few studies have investigated how fear of partner in past abusive relationships impacts the association between current IPV and these mental health correlates.

In an urban community in New England, the personal experiences of 212 IPV-exposed women were examined. Women’s experiences of current psychological, physical and sexual IPV, childhood abuse, posttraumatic stress, depression symptoms, and substance use were assessed along with fear of their partner in past abusive relationships. Almost all women reported past IPV (86 %), though fear of their partners varied (e.g., 20% were never fearful, 34% were a little or somewhat fearful, and 32% were very fearful). Structural equation modeling will be used to test how fear of partner in past abusive relationships impact current mental health and substance use. Results will advance knowledge regarding mechanisms through which past IPV experiences affect women’s current functioning and implications for intervention will be discussed.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7537 words || 
Info
4. Checton, Maria. and Greene, Kathryn. "“I Tell My Partner Everything . . . (or Not)”: Patients’ Perceptions of Sharing Heart-Related Information With Their Partner" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <BINARY/OCTET-STREAM>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634975_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study is grounded in theories of information management (Greene, 2009; Petronio, 2002; see also Donovan-Kicken & Caughlin, 2010, 2011; Goldsmith, Miller, & Caughlin, 2007). Patients with a diagnosed heart-related condition (N = 253) completed a survey regarding their perceptions of sharing/not sharing information with a partner about their health condition. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results indicated that (a) most patients report that they share “everything” with their partner, (b) there are significant group differences between patients who report sharing everything with a partner and those who report not sharing certain topics in terms of communication efficacy and patterns of communication (breadth, depth, and frequency) about a heart-related condition, and (c) there are no significant differences between the two groups in terms of sharing specific physical and psychological health information. We discuss the findings and implications of the study for patients, partners, and health care providers.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9766 words || 
Info
5. Compton, DLane., Poston, Dudley., Xiong, Qian. and Knox, Emily. "The Residential Segregation of Same-sex Partnered Households from Heterosexual Partnered Households in the U.S., 2008-2012" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1008024_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most residential segregation research has focused on racial/ethnic minorities from the majority race/ethnic group in the United States and several other countries. Few analyses have focused on the spatial segregation of sexual minorities from the majority. Our paper we analyzes the segregation of gay and lesbian households from heterosexual households. There is a void in the literature about the extent to which gay and lesbian couples are residentially segregated from heterosexual couples. While there are some studies of “gay spaces” and enclaves, most are case studies of single cities (e.g., San Francisco) or analyses of gay enclaves and political force and activism. We use two dissimilarity measures of residential segregation with the same-sex partnering data from the American Community Surveys for 2008 through 2012 to calculate segregation scores for the 98 MSAs with the largest gay and lesbian populations. We show that there is a sizable amount of homosexual-heterosexual residential segregation. We also show that gay males are more segregated from heterosexuals than are lesbians. Our research contributes to the general literature on residential segregation by focusing on a non-racial minority that has heretofore received very little attention. Additionally, we compare a new measure of residential segregation, the Unbiased D index—specifically designed for dealing with comparisons when the size of one of groups in the areal units of the MSA is decidedly smaller than another of the groups, with the more traditionally used D Index.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 342 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy