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2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 165 words || 
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1. Siller, Laura. and Cudmore, Rebecca. "Police Response to Intimate Partner Violence Calls for Service Over-Time: Is There a Difference in the Pattern of Arrests among Same-Sex Partners and Heterosexual Partners?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1030043_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Despite drastic changes in equality for same-sex couples, little attention to issues other than marriage equality has been paid in the empirical literature. One area that is in need of additional inquiry is the literature on same-sex intimate partner violence. Despite a wealth of literature on intimate partner violence among heterosexual couples, there is a dearth of literature on same-sex intimate partner violence. The absence of literature on same-sex intimate partner violence is concerning particularly in light of the fact that states can tailor domestic violence statutes in ways that exclude same-sex couples and in doing so create unequal treatment by law enforcement when they respond to domestic violence calls for service. Using data from the National Incident Based Reporting System database from 2000 to 2012, this study aims to explore whether similar cases involving same-sex and heterosexual couples result in similar police responses over-time. The aim is to assess whether the social equality impacting same-sex couples has translated to equitable treatment by law enforcement.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 95 words || 
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2. Eriksson, Li. and Mazerolle, Paul. "Characteristics of Partner and Non-Partner Homicide: Findings from the Australian Homicide Project" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516645_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The question of whether intimate partner violence is qualitatively different to other forms of violence has received much scholarly attention. This paper extends previous research by exploring differences between men who kill an intimate partner and other male homicide offenders. Using interview data with offenders in custodial and community corrections from the Australian Homicide Project, this paper specifically examines characteristics which differentiate partner from non-partner homicide. Agnew’s (1992) General Strain Theory is used as an organizing framework to examine pathways to intimate partner homicide. Research findings and implications for future homicide research will be discussed.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9766 words || 
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3. Compton, DLane., Poston, Dudley., Xiong, Qian. and Knox, Emily. "The Residential Segregation of Same-sex Partnered Households from Heterosexual Partnered Households in the U.S., 2008-2012" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1008024_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most residential segregation research has focused on racial/ethnic minorities from the majority race/ethnic group in the United States and several other countries. Few analyses have focused on the spatial segregation of sexual minorities from the majority. Our paper we analyzes the segregation of gay and lesbian households from heterosexual households. There is a void in the literature about the extent to which gay and lesbian couples are residentially segregated from heterosexual couples. While there are some studies of “gay spaces” and enclaves, most are case studies of single cities (e.g., San Francisco) or analyses of gay enclaves and political force and activism. We use two dissimilarity measures of residential segregation with the same-sex partnering data from the American Community Surveys for 2008 through 2012 to calculate segregation scores for the 98 MSAs with the largest gay and lesbian populations. We show that there is a sizable amount of homosexual-heterosexual residential segregation. We also show that gay males are more segregated from heterosexuals than are lesbians. Our research contributes to the general literature on residential segregation by focusing on a non-racial minority that has heretofore received very little attention. Additionally, we compare a new measure of residential segregation, the Unbiased D index—specifically designed for dealing with comparisons when the size of one of groups in the areal units of the MSA is decidedly smaller than another of the groups, with the more traditionally used D Index.

2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Words: 190 words || 
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4. Stauffer, Amy. and Kremling, Janine. "Intimate-Partners and Capital Punishment: Are Intimate Partners Treated Differently than Strangers in Capital Sentencing?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 01, 2006 <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p126566_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study focuses on sentencing patterns in a set of capital punishment eligible cases in the state of North Carolina. Victim-offender relationship is of particular interest. A series of logistic regression models are compared to determine the predictors of jury-imposed punishments for cases involving intimate partners and cases involving non-intimate partners (family, acquaintances, and strangers), while controlling for a variety of others factors that influence that decision. The first model shows that the covariates that predict a death sentence are operating differently for intimate partner homicides compared to non-intimate partner homicides. To partial out the effects, another logistic regression model is estimated that includes the family, acquaintance, and stranger relationship as separate dummy variables and the intimate partner relationship as the reference category. Analysis reveals that intimate partners are not treated more leniently than other offenders; however, death sentencing among intimate partners is predicted by different factors than death sentencing for other victim-offender relationships. To further analyze these indicators four logistic regression models are compared to determine the covariates that predict a death sentence for each victim-offender relationship. Results show that the covariates operate differently for each victim-offender relationship.

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