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2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 102 words || 
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1. Wolff, Russell. "Partnership in Policing: A Case Study of Police Partnership using an Organization Theory Lens" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1029913_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The meaning and nature of partnership in policing are understudied topics in policing research. This concept remains poorly operationalized, and the ways in which organizational processes in police departments work across different relationships have not been adequately investigated. To address these fundamental issues, a case study guided by organization theory was conducted in a medium-sized police department in New England with a reputation for high levels of community engagement. Data were collected for this qualitative study through interviews with 60 sworn and civilian police personnel, non-police partnership participants, and community members, observations, and document review. Findings from the completed project are discussed.

2013 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1360 words || 
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2. Yan, Wenfan. and Han, Yumei. "How Partnership Matters in Education: A Case of a Rural-Urban School Partnership Program in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Hyatt Regency, Indianapolis, IN, Nov 04, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p674025_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study applied sequential mixed method to study a government led policy titled “the Head Eagle Program” in China which aims to nurture and exert the leadership of selected rural schools via partnership with resourceful urban schools to examine the effectiveness of rural-urban partnership in terms of improving teachers’ professional development and shortening rural-urban educational gap.

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 8858 words || 
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3. Volpi, Frederic. "Partnership, Governance or Hegemony by Other Means? The EU and the Euro-Mediterranean partnership" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p73261_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It is argued that the US and the EU are conducting their foreign policies in very different ways, indeed Robert Kagan has suggested that they could be shaping two different world orders. This paper is interested in examining how far these apparently divergent conceptual approaches translate into clearly dissimilar policy practices. Beyond the much discussed US-EU positions on Iraq, does the EU have something qualitatively and quantitatively different to offer to the concept and practice of transnational governance? This paper analyses these issues through an investigation of the different elements of the Euro-Mediterranean partnership programme, to explore how far the EU is offering a new approach to transnational governance and how far it might be considered to be re-branding old approaches to north-south cooperation. The Euro-Mediterranean partnership offers a good practical example of what EU countries are doing at the regional level. Essentially, the Euro-Mediterranean partnership is an ambitious regional cooperation programme covering all aspects of the social, economic and political relations between the EU and the states of the southern shores of the Mediterranean. But what does the partnership imply in practice? Can the various programmes that the EU proposes to implement ensure economic development, manage social tensions and strengthen political and security institutions in a way that is beneficial for both parties, and for citizens as well as for states? Conceptually, there are obvious tensions between the strategic aims of EU engagement with Mediterranean partners. On the one hand the EU is attempting to strengthen existing illiberal state institutions in North African and Middle Eastern countries, in order to gain more effective cooperation with the EU on emigration control and anti-terrorist policies. On the other hand it is keen to promote power-sharing and good governance in countries which are essentially run on a non-democratic basis. In practice it is not at all certain that even if these conceptual difficulties can be solved, the various national and sub- or supra-national institutions involved in this programme can address the momentous technical challenges of multi-layered transnational governance that are intrinsic to this type of endeavour. Hence, this paper investigates how far this alleged partnership embodies new and effectives means of trans-national governance, and how far it merely repackages old realist principles and tools of north-south cooption.

2009 - 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 203 words || 
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4. Hamrita, Takoi. "A new paradigm for international education through partnership in development: Case study of the UGA-Tunisia educational partnership" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina, Mar 22, 2009 <Not Available>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298844_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: For higher education institutions around the world, building institutional capacity to cooperate internationally has become a priority as we face complex and global development, environmental, social, political, and security challenges. International partnerships between US universities and developing countries are typically initiated by faculty working within departmental boundaries to conduct projects that fit their areas of discipline and individual interests. Such partnerships derive from educational systems based on compartmentalization of resources on both sides and have a short-term impact on partners. In this presentation, the author reports on a partnership between her institution, the University of Georgia, and the higher education system of Tunisia, her home country. The partnership epitomizes a new paradigm in international cooperation aimed at creating long-term, broad based, and transformative institutional programs and relationships. Responding to Tunisia’s most urgent development needs, integrating institutional and national resources, building networks of decision makers, administrators, faculty, and students across disciplinary and institutional boundaries, and facilitating the development of indigenous expertise are among the attributes which have led to the program’s recognition through the Institute of International Education Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovation in International Education as well as the Tunisian National Medal of Merit in Science and Education.

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 675 words || 
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5. Cronin, Peter., Reddy, Nalini. and Ncontsa, Vuyiswa. "Private-public partnership and the future of international development: USAID and ELMA's partnership to affect teacher capacity in South Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p635896_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Seventeen years after democracy, South Africa has made enormous strides in providing access to schooling for all learners. By 2009, 98.8% of children aged 7 to 14 were enrolled in school. Yet, despite high enrollment rates and a massive investment in education (5% GDP), South Africa is struggling to provide a quality education in most schools. Only 38% of youth aged 19 to 25 have successfully passed their high school leaving exams while 17% were still in secondary school. Most learners exiting the school system are not equipped with basic skills and core competencies necessary to succeed in the workplace, much less in a highly competitive global market. SA’s youth unemployment rate is extremely high, with 48.3% of youth aged 14 - 23 and 28.5% aged 25 - 34 out of jobs in 2009. Employers consistently cite the inability to hire qualified workers as one of their greatest challenges. The South African government has identified improving the quality of education as a primary national priority.

There are many systemic factors that contribute to the poor educational outcomes in South Africa, ranging from inadequate infrastructure in schools to high rates of HIV/AIDS in the workforce. However, even with these significant challenges, there is widespread agreement across many sectors of society that an underperforming teacher corps and weak school management present a fundamental challenge to the South African basic education sector.

In response to these challenges, USAID created a unique partnership, unprecedented for the agency, with the ELMA Foundation, a South African-based philanthropic organization. While based in South Africa, the foundation funds and manages education and health projects in several southern African countries. ELMA agreed to match USAID’s education budget 1:1 which doubled the size of the funds available for programming. Together, USAID and ELMA developed an education program called the School Capacity & Innovation Program (SCIP), which focuses on developing the capacity of South Africa’s primary grade teachers, with the ultimate goal of increasing primary-grade learners’ reading achievement. Innovation, sustainability, and scalability are key components of the program. SCIP is also guided by USAID’s education strategy, drafted in 2010, which supports interventions to improve learning outcomes with a focus on primary grade reading as a measure of performance.

What makes the partnership unique is that USAID and ELMA are co-managing all the projects together. Historically, program partners with USAID remained at a financial, not programmatic, level. However, with the agency’s continued focus on local capacity development, engagement with and management of local entities require relationships previously not considered. Further, the partnership has secured funding from a private sector donor that contributed further funds to the program. While this latter relationship aligns more traditionally with USAID’s engagement with other donor entities, it has encouraged a rethinking in how USAID, along with a funding and managing partner, coordinate program funds. Through this partnership SCIP seeks to expand pockets of innovation and promise for the purpose of strengthening an overall weak South African education system, and to align with the Department of Basic Education’s prioritization of building the effectiveness of teachers and quality of school management.

The three implementing partners for SCIP provide distinctive approaches in addressing the issue of teaching and learner capacity. One implementer focuses on teachers’ ability to respond to learners’ needs through the creation of a computer-based assessment tool that can be used to more accurately track learner progress. Another project targets developing teachers’ classroom pedagogic practices by using video to highlight and share proven, quality teaching methods. Finally, the third implementer uses a community-based approach to help struggling learners by increasing teachers’ skills while fostering community and family involvement in learners’ education.

In the heterogeneous environment of South Africa, with its vast income inequality, eleven official languages, and socio-economic challenges, a one-size-fits-all approach to education reform will not address learners and teachers’ needs alike. USAID and ELMA’s new style of partnership, that supports local organizations in their use of innovative methods, may prove a viable option in providing effective pedagogic techniques to increase the reading skills of primary grade students.

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