Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,458 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 292 - Next  Jump:
2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. De Maeyer, Juliette. "Cut-and-Paste Journalism: A Collection of Scissors and Paste Pots, 1870-1990" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1362845_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper proposes to follow two mundane objects of journalism, the pair of scissors and the paste pot, as they are brought to existence by journalism textbooks between 1870 and 1990. In so doing, it explores the notion of "cut-and-paste journalism," between its modern understanding that links it to plagiarism and churnalism, and an earlier, nineteenth-century comprehension of newsmaking that saw reuses and reprints as a common, widely accepted practice. The analysis of textbooks (understood as crucial contributions to metajournalistic discourse) takes part in efforts to understand the historicized materiality of newsmaking. It also shows that the scissors and the paste pot, as well as the diversity of other objects that populate the notion of cut-and-paste journalism, can be primarily understood as devices of circulation, rather than devices of replication.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 11936 words || 
Info
2. Heisler, Martin. "The Politics of Managing the Past: Collective Self-Concepts in the Face of Unpalatable Revelations about the past" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p40177_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 6886 words || 
Info
3. Wang, Xiao. "Effects of Past and Anticipated Guilt on Individuals’ Health Intentions and Behavior and the Moderating Role of Past Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 21, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297016_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As a widely used guiding theory for health campaign design, the theory of planned behavior (TPB) has been criticized for focusing on cognitive variables only and failing to elicit emotional responses. The present study examined whether the addition of past and anticipated guilt would predict individuals’ exercise intentions and behavior under the theoretical framework of the TPB and whether individuals’ past behavior would moderate the effects of the two dimensions of guilt. Based on a two-wave longitudinal survey of 517 college students’ physical activity intentions and behavior, results showed that anticipated guilt, but not past guilt, significantly predicted physical activity intentions, over and above the influence of the TPB variables. It was further observed that anticipated guilt was a stronger predictor of intentions for participants who did not regularly participate in physical activity in the past than for those who did. Both theoretical contributions to the TPB and practical implications for health inventions are discussed.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 221 words || 
Info
4. Bennett, Caroline. "Past Present, Present Past: Restoring Time beyond the Khmer Rouge Regime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1187439_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The Khmer Rouge tribunal focuses on a punitive and retributive system of justice, one based in an international framework, where individuals must be held responsible for the terrible crimes of the Khmer Rouge and where justice is served through imprisonment and the finding of guilt. But for most Khmer people in Cambodia, these courts hold little relevance and make no impact on their everyday lives, where local forms of dealing with that period of history take dominance. Based on anthropological fieldwork in Cambodia, this paper will explore how people in rural Cambodia draw on Buddhist frames of reference to understand and narrate the regime, and by doing so are creating their own understandings and lived experiences of that period of historical violence. It will discuss how people narrate the period as situated within Buddhist temporality, one that situates times of chaos and stability as part of dukkha – the eternal suffering of life, and explore how through the resilience of Buddhism and its ritual resilience – the maintenance of forms of ritual (even if imaginative) during the regime - people make links between the period before the Khmer Rouge and after it, and thus are able to narrate the chaos and destruction as an aspect of Khmer Buddhist cosmology, that enables recovery in everyday life beyond the courts.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 292 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy