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2013 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9017 words || 
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1. Jen-Der, Lue. "Financial Crisis and the Social Policy Response in Greater China: Path Dependence or Path Breaking?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, Jun 27, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p654432_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The 2008 financial crisis caused by the sub-mortgage crisis in the U.S.A has brought an unprecedented negative economic disaster since World War II: economic downturn, abruptly increasing unemployment rate and sluggish export rate. The governments are forced to put forth a series of Keynesian fiscal and monetary measurements to copy with the sudden economic contraction. While these emergent measures were necessary during the crisis period, the increasing public deficits has resulted in the policy dilemma for the state after the crisis: the contradiction between increasing welfare demands and limited public revenues. The financial crisis has been therefore transformed into fiscal crisis and lastly the governance crisis of welfare capitalism. Using the institutionalist political economy approach developed by Streeck, this research aims to compare the three Chinese political economies in East-Asia: China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. It is expected to gain a deep knowledge of welfare capitalism change under the condition of financial crisis.


Keywords: financial crisis, institutionalist political economy approach, welfare capitalism, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 19926 words || 
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2. Olson, Abigail. and Wright, Nathan. "Paths to Policy Implementation: Differential Paths of Needle Exchange and Housing First Programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 20, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p506150_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Needle exchange programs and Housing First programs have much in common and share the same ideological premise. Scientific evidence has universally indicated that needle exchange programs are effective, while the evidence behind Housing First has been more mixed. Despite this evidence, needle exchange programs have faced major opposition and barriers to implementation in the United States, while Housing First programs have been almost universally supported. This study explores these differential levels of implementation, support, and funding for Housing First and needle exchange programs in 26 cities across the United States. The study analyzes the impact of 12 causal factors on whether or not needle exchanges are implemented. Racial diversity, AIDS case rates, legality, and presence of an ACT UP chapter were found to have positive bi-variate correlations with implementation of needle exchange programs. Three causal configurations leading to the implementation of needle exchange were observed using Qualitative Comparative Analysis: the presence of racial diversity, the absence of legal barriers to implementing needle exchange programs, and the combination of high rates of injection drug use and the presence of an ACT UP chapter. Two paths to rejection of needle exchange were identified: (the absence of racial diversity * presence of legal barriers to implementing needle exchange * absence of an ACT UP chapter), and (the absence of racial diversity * low rates of homelessness * presence of legal barriers to implementing needle exchange).

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 16 pages || Words: 4431 words || 
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3. Eiran, Ehud. "What Can Path Dependency Tell Us About the Israeli Settlements, and What Does Israeli Settler Activity Tell Us About Path Dependency?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72440_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper offers a theoretical understanding of Israeli Settlement activity in the Occupied Territories in light of the centrality of the issue in the current conflict as well as any effort to achieve peace. By using a path dependent lens, the paper analyzes how the settlement project was launched, nurtured, and promoted by various Israeli governments since the late 1960's. The paper explores the expansion of the settlements despite the international and domestic costs incurred by various Israeli governments. The paper is based in part on original research, and concludes that three path dependent processes lay at the heart of the exponential increase in the number of settlements - from a handful in 1968 to over 220,000 in 2002. In all three processes, the analysis points to institutional and cultural factors (that assumed new modes over time) as a significant cause in settlement expansion. While the paper accepts the traditional ideological and strategic explanations for settlement activity, it offers a more intricate view by exploring path dependent and institutional mechanisms for the increase in the number of settlements. Dismantling Israeli settlements is going to be a key issue in any future peace negotiations, and might serve as a model in other conflicts. It I therefore important that we develop a clear conceptual understanding of how they came to be in the first place. In the last part, the paper highlights the theoretical implications of the settlements' case for path dependency. More specifically, the paper explores the various roles that path dependency plays in inhibiting opposition to certain policies.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 9152 words || 
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4. Scott, John., Chen, Yung-Ping. and Chen, Jie. "Good Paths or Bad Paths? Phased Retirement and Opportunities in Transitioning from Work to Retirement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183653_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As the workforce of the United States is aging, some employees are able to modify full-time work status in order to “phase down” their career employment as they approach full retirement, and phased retirement may become increasingly common and important as the workforce continues to age. Our paper explores whether the ability to phase down one’s employment is associated with unequal endowments of human and financial capital. Using a unique definition of phased retirement based on data from a large, longitudinal dataset over a 10-year time period, this paper uses multinomial logistic regression and growth curve analyses to test the association between phased retirement and a variety of human and financial capital characteristics. We find that there are significant personal, household, and occupational differences between phased retirees and those who do not engage in phased retirement. Phased retirees appear to be better educated, have more resources, and occupy superior occupational positions. These results no doubt reflect that ad hoc nature of phased retirement, in which advantaged employees are able to discern and utilize opportunities as they arise.

2007 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 34 pages || Words: 8832 words || 
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5. McDevitt, Michael. "Origins of Dutiful Voting and Defiant Activism: The Parent Path and the Peer Path to Adolescent Civic Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, The Renaissance, Washington, DC, Aug 08, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p203405_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study explores a fundamental question about political learning: Does formal education engender compliance or differentiation, and perhaps defiance, in identity formation? Results from a three-year panel study of adolescents and parents support a model in which schools prompt discussion in families and peer groups. Interpersonal influence in the two spheres share common steps but can be viewed as parallel staircases to divergent orientations, with families encouraging voting and peer groups fostering confrontational activism.

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