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2014 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 172 words || 
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1. Chavez, Mario. "Employment patterns employed by DACA recipients: What are the impacts of social capital on DACA recipient’s employment patterns?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Riverwalk, San Antonio, Texas, Apr 16, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p717857_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that people who came to the US as children and meet certain criteria may request consideration for deferred action for two years and would be authorized for employment. This consideration is known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This study investigates the employment patterns and conditions that DACA recipients experience after receiving legal status. This study analyzes 15 in-depth qualitative interviews with DACA recipients that were recruited by utilizing snowball sampling technique to unpack these patterns and conditions. A social capital theory instrument, strength-of-weak-ties, was utilized to determine if the use of social capital yielded positive or negative results. The results of this study compliment social capital theory, solidify Strength-of-Weak-Ties theory, and particularly provide support for either weak or strong ties. By understanding this phenomenon (DACA) we may begin to understand the impact that this type of legislation may have on the lives of the remaining undocumented immigrants. Then we may stipulate its impact on the economy and create policy accordingly.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9517 words || 
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2. Horstman, Haley., Colaner, Colleen. and Rittenour, Christine. "Patterning Openness: Expanding Family Communication Patterns to Enhance Adult Adoptee Dual Family Identities and Self-esteem" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p715590_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Grounded in family communication patterns theory (FCPT) and intergroup theorizing, the current study investigated the role of adoptive parent communication in adoptees’ abilities to integrate their personal and family identities into their sense of self. Informed by the Common Ingroup Identity Model (CIIM; Gaertner et al., 1994), we hypothesized that adoptees’ abilities to reconcile their personal identities with their shared family identities with birth and adoptive families would contribute to their well-being in adulthood. SEM analyses demonstrated that adoptive identity work and shared family identity mediated the relationship between parental communication and adoptee self-esteem. Specifically, adoption structural openness predicted adoptees‘ reflective identity exploration, which in turn predicted adoptive shared family identity and adoptee self-esteem. The current project serves as an important first step in understanding the role of family communication in fostering integration of the complex layers of identity within diverse families. We explore implications for FCPT, CIIM, and adoptive identity theorizing.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 8 pages || Words: 3829 words || 
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3. Demerath, Loren. "Communicating Sociology to the Public with Stories of Patterns and Patterns of Stories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243150_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Sociologists often use statistics to communicate quantitative patterns to an untrained public, to undergraduates, and to policymakers, when certain kinds of stories would be more effective. While statistics are effective tools for discovering a pattern, they are less useful for communicating the context and meaning of that pattern. Much more useful is a "story of a pattern" that describes sociological pattern through a single, momentary event. Also useful are "patterns of stories" linked to each other based on the variables they involve. The paper suggests ways of finding, constructing, and analyzing both kinds of stories, as well as how they can be used to communicate research findings.

2009 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 35 pages || Words: 7688 words || 
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4. McCabe, Jessi. "Communication patterns in the age of new media: An examination of the relationship between family communication patterns, political tolerance, and Internet use" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Sheraton Boston, Boston, MA, Aug 05, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p375866_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the relationship between Family Communication Patterns, Political Tolerance, and Internet use. Socio-oriented homes are restrictive in media content and are less political, whereas Concept-oriented homes are the opposite. Diversity of ideas and political knowledge is necessary for tolerance development. Results indicate that socio-oriented homes are less tolerant. Internet use confounded the nature of expected relationships. Implications and future research of Internet use is discussed, particularly as it applies to FCP and tolerance.

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