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2015 - ASEH Annual Conference - Washington, D.C. Words: 304 words || 
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1. Doran, Connemara. "Modeling the Ride Up ‘Hubbert’s Peak’ and the Post-Peak Environmental Precipice: Controversies, Rhetoric, and Policy Challenges" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference - Washington, D.C., Washington Marriott, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p934047_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: At key moments of its sixty-six-year history, the theory, predictive methodology, and iconic image of “peak oil” was an object of intense political and policy debate greatly impacting environmental and energy decision-making. In 1956, geophysicist M. King Hubbert published a model of petroleum discovery and production that famously forecast a peaking of conventional oil production in the U.S. lower-48 states c.1970 (and world oil c.2000) in counterpoint to the era’s growing exuberance that abundant and cheap oil would continue to fuel rapid economic growth. With the advent of computer simulations, Hubbert developed new mathematical approaches to peak forecasting and advanced an arsenal of visual tools to rhetorical advantage in his 1962 report for the Kennedy Administration. Although his technique was rapidly utilized by OPEC and entered industry research practice, the U.S. Geological Survey buried Hubbert’s model and denied any limitations on U.S. oil reserves – until the 1973 oil crisis showed that U.S. fields could not increase output to replace embargoed supply.
I argue that the power of peak-oil simulations was their ability to depict at once both the mutability of the “shape” of the production curve with varying assumptions and the astonishing insensitivity of the time of the peak to even multifold greater estimates of ultimately recoverable reserves. By 2000, with growing signs of aging in the world’s supergiant fields, peak-oil modeling became a virtual industry for analysts advising the world’s largest corporations and diverse governmental departments in both rich and developing nations. Has increased production of natural gas and non-conventional oil (hydraulic fracturing, oil sands, off-shore drilling) reversed or accentuated uncertainties and concerns about a post-peak precipice? I trace how a number of scientists (guided by pragmatic, scientific, and “activist” goals) have reformulated models to assess both the promises and the environmental costs associated with non-conventional oil.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 181 words || 
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2. Torrens, Amanda. "Transcending Ourselves and Each Other: An Autoethnographic Encounter with Peak Communication Experiences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424245_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This autoethnography depicts a Peak Communication Experience (PCE) between me and an acquaintance that allowed us to transcend ourselves, each other, and the conversation itself to ultimately build a bridge of understanding and connection between us that surpassed the preconceived notions each of us held about the other. Traditionally, autoethnography has been used as a form of therapeutic expression to analyze the communicative aspects of incidents involving pain, loss, and hardship (Bochner & Ellis, 2006). Peak Communication Experiences, however, are communication in its best and rarest form; these dialogic episodes go beyond the discourse and the participants to create an enlightening communication encounter that captures the spirits of those involved and leaves a lasting impression that is both interpersonal and intrapersonal (Gordon, 1985). Drawing from the psychological foundations of Peak Experiences (Maslow, 1962), and the idea of communication as an act of transcendence (Shepherd, 2006), I explore the “in-the-moment” nature of PCE, reflect on my experience, and discuss the spiritual significance, both practical and theoretical, of these occurrences and why it is critical to capture these rare moments in narrative form.

2011 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 233 words || 
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3. Hamrah, Satgin. "Peak Oil: Energy Shortages and the Threat to Food Security" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Crowne Plaza, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 17, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p526432_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Emerging security threats such as energy and food shortages call for urgent action. Oil is a vital component of modern life, impacting all segments of society including the global economic system, socio-political structures, development needs and programs. It is widely believed that this finite resource will soon reach a point of maximum global production, called “peak oil.” This point occurs when oil supply will no longer be able to satisfy world demand, causing an energy shortage and higher oil prices. The ripple effect of higher oil prices will increase commodity prices, including the price of food. Higher food prices decreases the ability of developing nations to have access to food. As such, it is important to understand the obstacles associated with energy shortages and prepare for subsequent challenges. Preparation should include discussions about economical ramifications of a supply limitation, as well as social and humanitarian components. Past supply constraints illustrate that short-term restrictions in supply result in high oil and food prices. The realities associated with access to food will be further exacerbated if and when supply constraints are a result of long-term restrictions. This paper will analyze the supply demand relationship of oil, future energy shortages, the impact that such a shortage can have on food prices and its subsequent impact on developing countries. This paper will also present recommendations on how to decrease the negative impact of future energy shortages.     

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10178 words || 
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4. Davidson, Debra. "The Effort Factor: Revisiting Social-ecological Metabolism in the Era of Peak Oil" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722015_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Analyses of society’s precarious relationship with the ecosphere often start and end with the spotlight on consumption, both in popular discourse, and in academia. In the latter case, IPAT, and it's more recent variant, STIRPAT, represent one such dominant analytical framework that has offered valuable insights into the complex relationships between impact and consumption levels. Ecological impact is a function of effort, however, not reward. In other words, the relative inputs required to “produce” material commodities through the extraction and processing of natural resources has a more direct causal relationship with ecological impact than does the volume of resulting commodities that are subsequently consumed. As a result, we are not placing a requisite level of attention on the role of resource quality, and extraction processes in ecological impact. More importantly, this effort will tend to increase over time, as reserves of natural resources become degraded due to historical production. In this paper, I elaborate upon this thesis, and offer a supplementary illustration by cataloguing the historical relationship between oil production and ecological impact, with particular attention to the escalating production of non-conventional oil sources, including oil shale in th western U.S., and the oilsands in Alberta. Canada.

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