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Showing 1 through 5 of 47 records.
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2015 - PMENA-37 Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Rubel, Laurie. and Lim, Vivian. "PAWNSHOPS TO TEACH PERCENT AND PERCENT TO TEACH PAWNSHOPS" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the PMENA-37, Michigan State University’s Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, East Lansing, MI, Nov 05, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2018-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1022481_index.html>
Publication Type: Research Report
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper focuses on student learning in the context of a curricular module on pawnshops piloted with 15 students in an urban high school. The paper describes pedagogical frameworks guiding the development of the module and summarizes key features of its curriculum. Analysis focuses on student growth with respect to mathematical understanding of percent and opinions about pawnshops. Findings include student adoption of ratio strategies indicative of conceptual understanding of percent, and development of critical opinions about pawnshops as a lending system.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 186 words || 
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2. Feldmeyer, Ben., Steffensmeier, Darrell. and Ulmer, Jeffery. "Racial/Ethnic Composition and Violence: Size-of-Place Variations in Percent Black and Percent Latino Effects on Violence Rates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p575926_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Racial invariance positions and mainstream sociological perspectives on race and crime suggest that differences in structural conditions should account for most if not all of the racial composition (or percent Black) effect on aggregate-level violence rates. However, prior research (mostly conducted prior to 1990) generally provides mixed or contrary evidence for this position, showing instead that greater concentrations of Blacks are linked to increased violence even after accounting for racial differences in socioeconomic conditions. The current study uses recent data and a novel unit of analysis to go beyond extant research in two ways. First, we include percent Latino in our examination of the extent to which both racial and ethnic composition effects on violent crime rates are mediated by racial/ethnic disparities in socioeconomic disadvantage. Second, we test whether racial/ethnic composition effects are conditioned by size of place, through the use census places as a uniquely-varying unit of analysis. We find that both Black and Latino composition effects are partly explained away by controlling for structural conditions (especially structural disadvantage), but this characterizes smaller places much more than the largest, most urbanized places.

2018 - ACJS 55th Annual Meeting Words: 13 words || 
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3. Kurtz, Howard. "Aborted Terror in Oklahoma City- Hate and the Three Percent" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACJS 55th Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Feb 13, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1343096_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: McDevitt's Model of Hate Crimes applied to a case in Oklahoma City .

2018 - ACJS 55th Annual Meeting Words: 180 words || 
Info
4. Earl, Kevin. and Markovic, Vesna. "III Percenters: A Threat to Society?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACJS 55th Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Feb 13, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1346653_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Events involving right-wing militia-like groups that believe in the protection of Constitutional rights have been gaining increased attention across the country. These militia-like groups call themselves “III Percenters,” which stems from the concept that during the American Revolutionary War, only three percent of the colonists raised arms and fought against British forces. The III Percenter groups tend to be heavily armed, and have the appearance of being paramilitary, as they arrive to rallies and protests in tactical gear, camouflage, and brandishing weapons. This research will examine the questions of whether these III percenter groups are a threat to society, and if the reported violence associated with these groups has been carried out in the name of III percenter ideology or by non-affiliated individuals claiming III percenter membership. Since there are not many cases associated with this group, this study will take a case study approach. Open sources and other documents will be utilized to compile information on the violence in which these groups are involved to determine the threat level imposed by III percenters.

KEYWORDS: III Percenters, Domestic Terrorism, Violence, Politics

2012 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 165 words || 
Info
5. Schermbeck, David. ""We Are the 99-Percent”: An Analysis of the Newspaper Coverage of the Occupy Wall Street Movement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 15, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p586603_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Occupy Wall Street movement that swept through the United States in the fall of 2011 transformed the discussion about social inequality and corporate greed in the country, but only for a short time. The movement lacked a set of unifying goals or specific demands and, as a result, failed to maintain its momentum and generate coverage in the traditional news media. Using the news media-social movement interaction literature, I study the newspaper coverage of the Occupy Wall Street movement throughout the United States from September 15, 2011 to March 15, 2012. I develop a Poisson regression model that incorporates variables for a newspaper’s size, market characteristics, and previous candidate endorsements to analyze the variation in coverage across newspapers. I find each variable to be a significant predictor of newspaper coverage. I also suggest that the current literature is outdated and needs to be revitalized to account for the changes that both the organization of social movements and the news media landscape are currently undergoing.

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