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2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Words: 222 words || 
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1. Cloud, Nicole. "Performing the Embodiment of Other: Illuminating the Self: The Role of Performing Other in the Performance Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p257077_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: A text is a site of struggle; over meaning, and over power. Performance is that very battle embodied. In the global arena of the construction, (re)production, negotiation, contestation, and co-constitution of meaning, I articulate a call for opening up as contested space the confines of the classroom through critical performance, inviting the voices of bodies from the periphery into the very centers of our institutions of knowledge assembly. Through an autoethnographic reflexive essay recounting my experience instructing an introductory-level communication course alongside my enrollment in a graduate-level performance course, I contend that in inscribing an Other onto the self through critical performance in the classroom we open up the discourse(s) of power and privilege (and thus marginality) for potential scrutiny, critique, dismantling, and emancipatory change. I argue that when students are given the lens through which to recognize and articulate their own position of privilege, and are then asked to reconcile it with the voices of those often muted, they enflesh an agency often inaccessible to them from inside the apparatus of higher education. Critical performance pedagogy exposes a path toward empowerment from within the walls of the very institutions instrumental in reifying the hegemony that organizes our lived condition. To take this path is to deconstruct the boundaries of our felt experience, and renders visible terrain we have yet to traverse.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 150 words || 
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2. Williams, Katherine. "Performing Contract, Performing Cure: Early Modern Physic and All's Well That Ends Well" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481971_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The art of physic is crucial to the figure of Helena in All's Well That Ends Well, a play that probes performances of power, medical authority, and the possibilities of cure. Helena's designation as "empiric" invokes debates in the early modern period over the status of experiential knowledge in relation to theoretical knowledge. Her art requires "credit," and Helena negotiates this problem by employing the structural resources of a contract to enable her practice as an empiric and secure payment in the form of marriage. The play's juxtaposition of medical and marital contracts suggests the potential for contractual agency even as it dramatizes the difficulty of making this agency commensurate with other obligations and authorities. Building on recent work that expands attention to medical practitioners, practices, and forms of knowledge, this paper considers how the female practitioner and her knowledge operate within and complicate medical, economic, legal, and domestic discourses.

2011 - Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 144 words || 
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3. Nieves, Dr. Yolanda. "Dangerous Performances: Re-searching Social Justice through Performance and Critical Discourse" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champain Illini Union, Urbana, IL, May 17, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486277_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Performance as a social justice agenda generates uneasiness for witnesses of the performance. This study asks: can researchers, as radical adult educators, utilize performance to contest and transcend conventional knowledge? Can the tension of witnessing counter-narratives enhance liberatory discourse? This presentation proposes to highlight the performance of counter-narratives as a re-search encounter for critical dialogue and social justice. Using narrative data on hunger, class, and gender, and the frameworks of LatCrit and Critical Race Feminism, the audience is invited to engage in reflexive dialogue. The emphasis will be on the physical and emotional tensions experienced during the performance. The interrogation of the multi-intersectional points of the re-search that encompasses academic/white priviledge, narrative date as counter-stories, and performance will be discussed. The hope is that the presentation will provide an organic experience in shared meaning making for the participants.

2012 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Pages: 16 pages || Words: 3493 words || 
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4. Morijiri, Yuki. "The Constructed Elements of Performance for Piano Performers: Priorities and Components" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, Thessaloniki Concert Hall, Thessaloniki, Greece, Jul 15, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p552018_index.html>
Publication Type: Spoken Paper (Full Paper) for Commission Seminars
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In recent research studies, various musical performance elements have been noted from the standpoint of an external evaluation of performance quality. This paper focuses on constructed elements of piano performance from the viewpoints of the performers themselves and investigates how performers recognise performance elements (in terms of interpretative and technical components) and how they prioritise such performance elements to review and build up the quality of their own performances.

Eleven participants (Male = 2, Female =9) had each majored in piano performance during their former undergraduate studies in Japan. The current occupations were either as postgraduate students, piano teachers, music teachers or performers, or combinations of these. The research method was designed to include semi-structured interviews and related analyses to generate a performance elements map. Fourteen performance elements were reported: overall flow, musical expression, phrasing, rhythm, melodic accuracy, tempo, technique, interpretation of music, dynamics, rubato, pedalling, tone quality, touch and style.

From an analysis of the data, several elements were likely to be considered as more interpretative amongst participants: phrasing, style and interpretation of music. On the other hand, some elements were considered to be more technical, such as melodic accuracy and technique. Participants’ priorities for the performance elements showed individual differences, especially in the elements of melodic accuracy, style and rubato. Overall flow and musical expression were thought to be more important elements in piano performance. From the analysis of the interviews, it can be suggested that the greatest individual influence on their performance was the teacher responsible for their late teenage period. It was likely that their current personal priorities in learning piano performance were affected by their teachers from this critical developmental period.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 10058 words || 
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5. Moynihan, Donald. "What Do We Talk About When We Talk About Performance? Different Approaches to Understanding Performance Budgeting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Aug 31, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-07-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p60374_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) in the federal budgeting process. The early evidence on PART prompts the search for a theory of budgeting that accepts that performance information will influence decisions, but will not be used in the same way from decision to decision, as the espoused theory of performance budgeting suggests. Dialogue theory emphasizes the ambiguity of performance information and related resource allocation choices. An exploratory test of dialogue theory is undertaken through an experiment involving graduate students assessing PART evaluations. The results illustrate a variety of ways in which different individuals can examine the same program and, using logical warrants, come to different conclusions about performance and future funding requirements.

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