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2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6386 words || 
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1. Struett, Michael. "Rules for NGO Participation in International Fora ? When do states permit it?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p100409_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Non-State actors have participated in a variety of international forums in recent years, for the most part under ad hoc procedures developed in each circumstance. This paper will catalog both the formal rules and informal practices of NGO participation at a variety of international meetings, including the 1993 Vienna World Conference on Human Rights, the 1995 Beijing conference on women, the 1998 Rome Conference on the International Criminal Court, the 2002 Durban conference on racism, and the meetings of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). In Vienna, Beijing, and Durban, NGOs held separate conferences parallel to the formal intergovernmental sessions because states wanted to close NGO access to some meetings, but in practice NGOs had varying degrees of access. In Rome and under the CBD rules, NGOs have had formal channels of access. The paper also will examine cases of state objections to NGO access to United Nations meetings under the ECOSOC consultative status procedure. Finally, the paper will review any formal state policy statements adopted in response to the UN Secretary General?s call for increased NGO access to the General Assembly as part of the ?In Larger Freedom? report on proposals to reform the UN issued in December 2004. The central question the paper seeks to address is when and under what circumstances states permit non-state actors to participate, and why do they qualify some organizations for such participation but not others?Non-State actor access to international organizations is theoretically crucial if epistemic communities are capable of transforming the international agenda as hypothesized in that tradition (Haas 1990). From the perspective of communicative action theory, the participation of non-state actors in political discourse may help to legitimate collective decisions about rules and norms (Kratochwil 1989, Habermas 1996).

2008 - SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY Words: 223 words || 
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2. Wiedeman, Allison. "The Effluent Limitations Guidelines and NPDES Permit Regulations for CAFOs: Status of Implementation, Coordination with USDA, and Response to the 2nd Circuit Court Decision" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY, TBA, Tucson, Arizona, Jul 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p235590_index.html>
Publication Type: Oral Presentation
Abstract: EPA issued the revised regulations for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) on Feb. 12, 2003. With full implementation, EPA estimated that the rule would result in an annual reduction of over 166 million pounds of nutrients which represents a 25% reduction from current levels in runoff from CAFO operations. In addition, the rule would result in annual reductions of more than 2 billion pounds of sediment and more than 911,000 pounds of metals, as well as significant percentage reductions in pathogens. These regulations require zero discharge of manure and process wastewater from the production area (except in the case of very large storms), and for the first time, regulate discharges coming from a CAFOs land application area. Shortly after the regulation was promulgated, court challenges to the regulations were brought by animal production industry groups and by environmental interests. The Second Circuit Court of Appeals made its ruling on February 28, 2005 (generally referred to as the Waterkeeper decision). EPA proposed revisions to the 2003 rule in 2006 and will finalize these revisions in early 2008. This paper will cover the requirements of the final CAFO NPDES regulations, review the status of permitting and related regulation development across the country, and describe some of EPA's efforts to coordinate with USDA in the implementation of this rule.

2012 - ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 249 words || 
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3. Pilecki, Andrew., Hammack, Phillip., Bar-Tal, Daniel. and Halperin, Eran. "Mapping the Moral Permit to Harm: Construction and Validation of the Delegitimization Scale" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting, Mart Plaza, Chicago, IL, Jul 06, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p570917_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although the concept of delegitimization is rich with theoretical exposition (Bar-Tal, 1989; 1990; Bar-Tal & Hammack, in press), there is a relative lack of empirical work due to the absence of a validated measure of delegitimization. To address this need, the purpose of this study was to construct and validate an explicit measure of delegitimization as well as demonstrate the unique explanatory power of delegitimization in accounting for the psychological permit to harm other groups. Delegitimization was operationalized as the magnitude of difference perceived to exist between a target group and an unspecified community of "most other groups" along a series of moral dimensions informed by Moral Foundations Theory (Haidt & Graham, 2009). Items for the Delegitimization Scale were derived from quantitative and qualitative data collected in the US and Israel. Subsequently, in a series of studies using US and Jewish Israeli samples, the validity of the Delegitimization Scale was assessed in relation to similar constructs (e.g., infrahumanization, dehumanization, moral exclusion and psychological essentialism). In addition, the relationship between Delegitimization Scale scores and the psychological permit to harm was examined. Overall, results supported the validity of the Delegitimization Scale. Moreover, results indicated that Delegitimization Scale scores were able to significantly predict permit to harm scores even after accounting for the variance due to other constructs. By validating a measure of delegitimization, this study provides an invaluable tool for future intergroup relations research as well as demonstrates the unique contribution that delegitimization offers as a construct in explaining intergroup violence.

2018 - 89th Annual SPSA Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Cole, Alex. "Not Forbidden but Permitted: The Thirty Years' War in Schiller and Grass" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 03, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1302462_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Friedrich Schiller and G√ľnter Grass are staples of the German literary tradition. Yet, these two luminaries' connection with The Thirty Years' War is seldom explored in the academic literature. Both writers, despite writing in vastly differing temporal contexts, use The Thirty Years' War as a critical event in the Germany imaginary in order to make statements of vast political import.

Schiller's "Wallenstein" trilogy is a masterwork of drama, using the Thirty Years' War and its hero, the eponymous Albrecht von Wallenstein, as literary tools for the advancement of Schiller's own thoughts regarding ethics, religion, and politics.

Grass, however, in his novella "The Meeting at Telgte," explores the aftermath of The Thirty Years' War and the subsequent Treaty of Westphalia as a means of discussing his vision of a "Literary Germany" in the midst of the late 20th century.

This essay will investigate the importance of The Thirty Years' War in the literature of Schiller and Grass in order to elucidate each writer's vision for Germany, and indeed, the world. Schiller's vision is for a politics and ethics in which aesthetic taste forms the will of citizens in a liberal state. Grass wishes for those living in such a liberal state to become self-aware regarding their language, literary past, and history in such a way as to act in social democratic direction. The common denominator is that literature is not an accessory to the development of political consciousness, but is essential.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 11 pages || Words: 3416 words || 
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5. Donati, Teresa. "Permitted Fears" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107963_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Overt expressions of fear inthe US are differentially permitted by gender and age. Acknowledging fear, especially by males, is penalized by loss of standing in the eyes of peers because of the status/power hierarchies routinely established in male interactions,especially at young ages. The hidden aspects of fear are discussed in parallel to psychotherapy and ethnomethodology, to uncover hidden fears (hidden because not "permitted") and to explore their impact on larger interaction settings.

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