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2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 100 words || 
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1. Hourigan, Kristen. "Homicide Survivors’ Definitions of Forgiveness: Intra-personal, Inter-personal, and Extra-personal Orientations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 17, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1027236_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the definition of forgiveness from the perspective of individuals who have lost loved ones to homicide. The paper draws on 33 in-depth, semi-structured interviews that asked participants to define and discuss forgiveness and non-forgiveness both in general and as it relates to their experiences after the murder of their loved ones. Analysis shows three distinct definitions of, or orientations toward, forgiveness, each learned through interaction with family and/or religion: intra-personal, inter-personal and extra-personal. Analyses suggest that future investigations must include multiple definitions of forgiveness, and victim services must be cognizant of these various pathways towards forgiveness.

2012 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 81 words || 
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2. Adams, Megan. "From The Personal Is Political to The Personal Is Personal: Postfeminism, Agency, and the Rhetoric of Choice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Oakland Marriott City Center, Oakland, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p572822_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The theoretical limitations and concrete possibilities of choice have been central to the contemporary battleground of feminist agency. In this paper, I examine the tension between feminist theories and politics and the individual compromises made in women's lived experiences. By revisiting the current debates about the political implications of choice and women's agency when feminist politics collide with personal desires and priorities, I seek to complicate the individualist approach of the "postfeminist" moment, particularly with regards to sites of traditional femininity.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6993 words || 
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3. Chock, Tamara., Schackman, Daniel., Ostrowski, Michelle. and Sethi, Ritesh. "It Don’t Matter to Me: The Impact of Self-Relevance and Social Distance on Third Person, First Person, and Second Person Effect Judgments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p258668_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study found that social distance and self-relevance affected self-other perceptions concerning the effects of anti-methamphetamine messages. Participants who made 3PE judgments gave the lowest ratings of message self-relevance, methamphetamine-use intent, similarity of people in the PSAs to self and peers, and message credibility. Those who made 2PE judgments reported the highest levels of self-relevance, methamphetamine-use intent, and message credibility. Message “quality” increased perceived effects on self, but didn’t’ determine the type of self-other judgment.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 484 words || 
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4. Walker Marciano, Alisha., Favero, Domenica., Mayhew, Amanda., Greene, Lyndsay., Beidleman, Moran. and Rigney, Sean. "Personality and Princesses: Personality Traits Associated with Exposure to Princesses in Preschool Aged Girls" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955002_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: In 2012 the Disney Princess brand had retail sales of over 1.5 billion in the US and Canada (TLL). Because the Disney Princess brand is so popular among young girls (Orenstein, 2012), we were interested in how exposure to the Disney Princess brand may influence personality development in young girls. As was demonstrated in Bandura’s famous Bobo doll experiments, children imitate behaviors they observe in others. Young girls may try to emulate the personality traits of princesses. The goal of the present study was to explore whether exposure to the Disney Princess brand was related to personality traits exhibited by preschool-aged girls. It was hypothesized that girls with more exposure to the Disney Princess brand would be more extraverted, agreeable, conscientious, and open to new experiences and would be less neurotic.
Although data collection is ongoing, 30 preschool-aged girls (Mage=4.5) have participated in the study. In an individual interview session, the girls were asked about their favorite princess and were asked to identify princesses they believed to be kind, brave, smart, and pretty. A parent completed the Inventory of Children’s Individual Differences (ICID; Deal et al., 2007) via Survey Monkey in order to assess personality traits of the child. The parent also reported on the child’s exposure to the Disney Princess brand. Most of the participants were Caucasian (91%) with a fairly even distribution of socioeconomic status (low = 35%, middle = 21%, upper = 39%, no response = 5%).
Anna (23%), Elsa (23%) and Ariel (20%) were selected most often as the child’s favorite princess. The most common reasons that children gave for selecting a favorite princess were based on appearance (30%), such as liking her hair or clothing, or a special trait/characteristic (30%), such as being a mermaid or having special powers. More than half of the girls indicated that Cinderella, Ariel, Aurora, Rapunzel and Anna were pretty and that Ariel, Aurora, Belle and Anna were kind. Only one princess (Anna), however, was described as smart by more than half of the girls and no princesses were described as brave by more than half of the girls.
Independent samples t-tests comparing girls with high and low exposure to the Disney Princess brand indicated that girls with more exposure exhibited higher levels of extraversion (t(16)=-2.33,p=.03) and openness (t(19)=-2.64,p=.02). Agreeableness, conscientiousness and neuroticism were not significant. Of the 15 subscales on the ICID, five had significant differences between the two groups. Girls with more exposure to Disney princesses were reportedly more sociable, considerate and achievement oriented whereas girls with less exposure to the Disney princesses were more shy and fearful.
Results suggest that stereotypical traits, such as kind and pretty, seem to be attributed more frequently than non-stereotypical traits, such as smart and brave. Also, girls with more exposure to Disney princesses may be imitating some of the traits exhibited by princesses given that they were more sociable, considerate, achievement oriented and open to new experiences.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Van Gool, Ellen., Van Ouytsel, Joris., Ponnet, Koen. and Walrave, Michel. "The Effects of Personal and Socioeconomic Characteristics on the Sharing of Personal Information About School on Facebook" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107534_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Adolescents are the most fervent users of social network sites, hereby disclosing a lot of personal information about relationships or hobbies, but also about school. This study wants to investigate the personal and social factors that might explain adolescents’ sharing of personal information about school on Facebook. The Theory of Planned behavior was used as a theoretical base, extended by problematic Facebook use, online risk behavior, socio-economic situation and depressive feelings in order to explain the adolescents’ disclosing behavior. Based on a sample of 1359 adolescent, the results show that the normative aspect of self-disclosing behavior explains a significant amount in adolescents’ sharing of personal information about school, but that personal and socio-economic influences might not be neglected. Prevention and intervention strategies towards the safe sharing of information online should thus aim to target not only the adolescents’ at risk, but also the broader social context.

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