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2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6448 words || 
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1. Kim, Yonghwan. and Chen, Hsuan-Ting. "Social Media and Political Participation: The Mediating Role of Exposure to Cross-Cutting Perspectives and Like-Minded Perspectives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p556251_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines (1) how social media use (i.e., blogs and social network sites) influences individuals’ online political participation; and (2) the mediating role of exposure to political perspectives (i.e., cross-cutting exposure and exposure to like-minded viewpoints) in the relationship of social media use and online political participation. The results show that both blog and SNS use are positively related to online political participation. Most interestingly, exposure to like-minded perspectives mediates the relationship between individuals’ blog use and online political participation while cross-cutting exposure mediates the relationship between SNS use and participation.

2017 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Crawford, Caroline. "Shifting Professional Perspectives: Engaging in Team-Based Video Conferencing as an Multiple Emphasis Approach towards Analysis, Shifting Perspectives, Digital Age Training, and Professional Representations of Self" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Orlando Caribe Royale, Orlando, Florida, Feb 10, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1170093_index.html>
Publication Type: Multiple Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Engaging video conference efforts within graduate coursework, specifically within a team group approach, supports several professional areas of emphasis, with professional strengths and shifting understandings of self within a community.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Vander Heyden, Karin., Huizinga, Mariëtte. and Jolles, Jelle. "Conflict Between Perspectives: 8- to 11-year old Children’s Performance on a Spatial Perspective-Taking task" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958107_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A critical step in the development of spatial reasoning is the ability to inhibit the primary egocentric perspective while making spatial transformations from another perspective. Research showed increasing efficiency in controlling this conflict between the self and other perspective during the middle school years, probably related to developmental progress in the executive control functions (Surtees & Apperly, 2012; Frick, Möhring, & Newcombe, 2014).
In the current study we investigated this conflict between the self and other perspective with a spatial task that required 8-11 year-old children to navigate through a three-dimensional layout after a 180°- or 90°-perspective change (see Figure 1). The study aimed at finding evidence for developmental progress in making these perspective changes and investigated the type of errors children of different ages made. We differentiated between egocentric errors (error in the required perspective change: starting at the egocentric side of the layout; ‘visual perspective-taking’) and mirroring errors (starting at the altercentric side of the layout, but making left/right, front/behind reversals during navigation, ‘spatial perspective-taking’).
The sample included 245 children (48% boys) from grade 3 to 6, recruited from seven regular elementary schools in the Netherlands. We divided the sample into four groups, based on age: 8-year-olds (n = 65), 9-year-olds (n = 69), 10-year-olds (n = 47), and 11-year-olds (n = 64).
Results showed increasing accuracy on this task, especially from ten years of age (180°-trials: increase from 77% correct at age 8 to 89% correct at age 11; 90°-trials: 61% correct at age 8 to 84% correct at age 11). For children under ten, the 90°-trials were more difficult than the 180°-trials (see Figure 2). The large standard deviations indicate considerable individual differences at all ages.
Analysis of the type of errors showed that children were better able to ignore their own perspective when making a 180°-perspective change (9% egocentric errors at age 8, 8% at age 11) than making a 90°-perspective change (35% egocentric errors at age 8, 15% at age 11). Walking a route from this new perspective was found to be difficult under both rotation angles: 30-40% of children up to ten years of age experienced difficulties in resisting their egocentric reference frame, which was expressed in their mirroring errors (left/right and front/back reversals) during navigating. In the older children, the number of mirroring errors decreased to 15% in the 180°-trials, but stagnated around 40% in the 90°-trials.
It can be concluded that considerable developmental progress takes place in visual and spatial perspective-taking between 8 and 11 years of age: children become better able to inhibit their egocentric perspective while making spatial transformations from another perspective. Progress was especially apparent from ten years of age, and more in the 180°-rotations than in the 90°-rotations.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 39 pages || Words: 11105 words || 
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4. Johnson, Susan. "Teaching Global Perspectives to Students Lacking a Global Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253494_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Global Perspectives is a 100 level interdisciplinary general education course required of students at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. The course content includes international relations, international economics and human geography. The majority of students come to the class suspicious of the material and expressing a general disdain for the subject matter. This paper explores three techniques utilized by the author to better engage students in material they find quite “foreign”. The three techniques analyzed are personalized lectures, collaborative lectures and perspective simulations. Personalized lectures involve the integration of student responses to an anonymous survey into lecture material presented throughout the semester. Collaborative lectures require students to research and present information relevant to the topic at various points in a day’s lecture. The instructor is responsible for assigning the material and then integrating student research into the lecture at the appropriate times. Finally, perspective simulations ask students to place themselves into virtual realities where they are required to make decisions, often life and death decisions, and then analyze their decision-making process and reflect on the choices they have made. The analysis in this paper will illustrate how each of these three techniques increases student engagement and fosters the development of a global perspective.

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