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2012 - LRA 62nd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1800 words || 
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1. Wickens, Corrine., Jung, Jin. and Parker, Jenny. "Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) Candidates’ Perceptions of Integrating Content Area Literacy into Physical Education" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 62nd Annual Conference, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, CA, Nov 28, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p578299_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Ball, Christopher., Francis, Jessica., Huang, Kuo-Ting., Kadylak, Travis., Cotten, Shelia. and Rikard, RV. "The Physical-Digital Divide: Exploring the Social Gap between Digital Natives and Physical Natives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1251531_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We live in a world that is becoming increasingly interconnected via information and communication technologies (ICTs). The benefits of ICT are significant but there are those that experience these devices differently. The digital divide is an evolving concept which includes a myriad of dimensions and repercussions. Older adults specifically are the most digitally divided demographic group. The present study seeks to explore how older adults perceive the actual physical use of ICT, particularly across generations and contexts, in order to gain deeper insights into their unique experiences. Data for the present study come from a series of focus groups conducted in the Midwest. The results indicate that seniors acknowledge that ICT helps them connect with distant social ties, but that it is actually disconnecting with near social ties. Therefore, in building off of these findings and the digital divide literature, we label this particular phenomenon the “physical-digital divide.” A “social access gap” exists when a particular group feels ostracized or offended when those around them engage with ICT while they themselves are not. In conclusion, younger generations are often referred to as “digital natives” and older generations as “digital immigrants.” We believe that a more apt label for older adults may be “physical natives” as their preferred method of communication involves physical face-to-face interactions and traditional codes of etiquette. Suggestions are made for reducing the divide by increasing intergenerational awareness and understanding regarding ICT usage etiquette.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Li, Ru., Bunke, Sofia. and Psouni, Elia. "Attachment relationships and physical activity in adolescents: The mediation role of physical self-concept" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p931329_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While the physical and psychological benefits of regular physical activity (PA) in youth are undebatable, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies consistently show that PA-participation declines dramatically during early adolescence (Malina & Katzmarzyk, 2006). Social relationships have significant implications for PA motivation in adolescence (e.g., Allender et al., 2006; VanDerHorst, et al., 2007) and felt (attachment) security in close relationships is linked to self-perceptions. While there is evidence that attachment relationships may also be useful for understanding antecedents of PA motivation and behavior (Ullrich-French et al., 2011), little is known about potential mechanisms of the association between attachment and PA behavior. The present study examined associations between adolescents’ attachment relationships with parents and peers and their engagement in PA, evaluating the potential mediation role of physical self-concept in this link and exploring gender differences.

Participating adolescents (N=783, 49% male, Mean age=12.92 years, SD=.86) completed the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA; Armsden & Greenberg, 1987) assessing attachment to mother, father and peers, the Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP; Fox & Corbin, 1989), and the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A; Kowalski et al., 2004), a 7-day recall questionnaire addressing physical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed indirect influences from attachment security with mother and peers to physical activity, with physical self-concept fully mediating this path. A decomposition of total and indirect effects from mother and peer attachment to PA showed: (i) For mother attachment a total effect on PA (β=.16, p<.01) and an indirect effect via the mediation of physical self-concept (β=.14, p<.01), the latter making up 87.5% of the total effect from mother attachment to PA; (ii) For peer attachment, a total effect on PA (β=.13, p<.01) and an indirect effect via the mediation of physical self-concept (β = .10, p< .01), the latter making up 76.9% of the total effect from peer attachment to PA. The direct effect from father attachment to PA was significant (β=.13, p<.01). The final parsimonious model (Figure 1; Table 1/Model 2d) demonstrated meaningful prediction of PA behavior (30.4% of variance in PA explained) and partially supported the hypothesized meditational processes. Multi-group SEMs revealed some differences in patterns of association among variables in baseline models for males and females respectively, but when we compared a series of nested models and imposed equality constraints of the regression paths linking the latent factors (excluding the paths that were not identical from the baseline models) across male and female groups (Table 1/Model 3g), gender invariance of the regression parameters was shown (Δχ²(5)=6.99, p>.05).

Our results provide further evidence for the link between attachment relationships and PA behavior during adolescence, stipulating a mechanism underpinning relations between affective and behavioral aspects of adolescent development. Specifically, they point to significant indirect influences from attachment security with mother and peers, respectively, to adaptive physical behavior, in both cases mediated by physical self-concept. Importantly, results also indicate a unique direct contribution of attachment security with father to adaptive physical behavior. Explaining the underlying psychological mechanisms for how attachment security influences PA behavior in adolescence can have significant implications for PA interventions and public health ramifications.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Davis, Cynthia., Usher, Nicole., McCormick, Sean-Patrick., Mantzoros, Christos. and Crowell, Judith. "Associations among Childhood Sexual and Physical Abuse, Adult Mental Health, Social Functioning and Physical Health" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p960475_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent research shows that childhood trauma and abuse is linked to Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) in midlife (Lee, Tsenkova, & Carr, 2014). There are no known studies that examine whether distinct forms of child abuse may differentially lead to poor health, and no studies that examine how mental health and social supports mediate these relations, but biological and behavioral pathways are hypothesized (Pervanidou & Chrousos, 2011). This study takes a lifespan developmental approach and examines mediators, vis-à-vis adult mental health and social functioning, in the relations between childhood physical and sexual abuse and adult health.
Two hundred thirteen racially diverse midlife adults (35-55 years) of diverse SES reported on childhood (<18 years) physical or sexual abuse during semi-structured interviews. Mental health symptoms were obtained using the Beck Depression Inventory II (Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger & Gorsuch, 1983), Aggression Questionnaire (Buss & Perry, 1992), and UCLA Loneliness Scale (Russell, 1996). The Social Adjustment Scale (Schooler, Hogarty, & Weissman, 1979) assessed social functioning (domains: work, marital, social, economic, extended family, parental). Health risk behaviors were obtained through the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire (Block & Subar, 1992), energy expenditure in metabolic hours/week, self-reported smoking, and self-reported drinking. Non-optimal values were given a ‘1’ and scores were summed across the four behaviors. MetS sum scores were calculated based on waist-hip ratio, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, and hdl cholesterol. Non-optimal values were given a ‘1’ and scores were summed across the five indicators.
Using path analysis, results showed that both childhood physical and sexual abuse linked to worse adult social functioning, but depression mediated this relation for physical abuse. Sexual abuse was not associated with depression, but the relation between sexual abuse and social functioning became non-significant when controlling for depression (2(7)=11.68, p>.05; RMSEA=.056). Anxiety and aggression mediated the relation between physical abuse and social functioning. Although the association between sexual abuse and social functioning remained, regardless of anxiety or aggression (anxiety 2(7)=12.27, p>.05; RMSEA=.060; aggression 2(7)=13.70, p>.05; RMSEA=.067). Loneliness mediated the relation between sexual abuse and social functioning. Physical abuse was not associated with loneliness, but the relation between physical abuse and social functioning became non-significant when controlling for loneliness (2(7)=10.55, p>.05; RMSEA=.049). Social functioning then linked to more health risk behaviors and higher MetS sum scores, but there were no direct links between childhood sexual or physical abuse and adult physical health.
Direct, but differential, associations existed between child abuse and mental health, even into midlife. Physical abuse was associated with adult depression, anxiety, and aggression symptoms. Sexual abuse was associated with adult loneliness. Indirectly, loneliness explained the relation between sexual abuse and social functioning, while depression, anxiety, and aggression explained the relation between physical abuse and social functioning. Child abuse and adult mental health influenced adult physical health indirectly, through their associations with adult social functioning. Results provide a pathway hypothesis for the relation between child abuse and adult health through adult mental health and social functioning, and offer several points of intervention in this pathway.

2015 - National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference Words: 227 words || 
Info
5. Guillory, J. Anthony. ""The Physical Uplift of the Race: The Emergence of the Black Physical Culture Movement, 1900-1930."" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference, The Westin Los Angeles Airport Hotel, Los Angeles, California, Mar 11, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1005034_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper challenges prevailing themes that dominate historical accounts of African American sport. I argue that elements of African American physical culture should be understood within a context of the particular social, political, and economic circumstances that influenced their respective arrivals. I demonstrate the limitations of what I call the metanarratives of black sport history by tracing the emergence of the early twentieth century black physical culture movement. I contend that this movement was greatly influenced by the circumstances that inspired Rayford Logan to consider the historical period a nadir of black history in the United States. During this period, white social reformers developed welfare programs to help native-born whites and European immigrants adjust to their new lives in urban areas. At the same time, many of these white social reformers posited that African Americans were physically inferior and destined for biological extinction. They used these arguments to justify their refusal to help blacks address the social issues that affected their communities. Black intellectuals and community leaders responded to this injustice by conducting their own social scientific investigations and by putting forth their own programs for social betterment. I rely on primary source evidence to show that Black social reformers saw physical culture as an integral part of their plans to improve many of the urban conditions that afflicted the race.

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