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2013 - MWERA Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4577 words || 
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1. Shan, Jiani. "Play Creativity and Play for Creativity: A Cross-culture Comparison of Preschool Children’s Play And Creativity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MWERA Annual Meeting, Hilton Orrington Hotel, Evanston, Illinois, Nov 06, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p675561_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As a part of human’s nature and one of children’s rights, play is a powerful learning medium related to cognitive, language, social and emotional development(Bergen, 2009). Creativity, one of the most important components of play, has been seen by theorists, educators and teachers as an important predictor for a country’s future competitiveness. The importance of the relationship between play and creativity not only suggests that through play creativity can be measured, but through play creativity can be fostered.
The present study investigated and compared young children’s play patterns to see if there were significant differences in children’s development of creativity between Chinese and American cultures,. The initial hypothesis is supported that there is no significant difference in creativity between preschool children from the two countries.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Goble, Priscilla., Martin, Carol., Hanish, Laura., Foster, Stacie., Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie. and Fabes, Richard. "Free Play or Guided Play? An Observational Study of Preschool Play Experiences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955399_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Early childhood educators recently have begun to draw distinctions between free play and guided play. Free play is voluntary and child-driven, such that children independently decide what to do and with whom. Guided play is also child-driven; however, during guided play, teachers guide children’s play in productive ways. Based on limited intervention research and theory, guided play is thought to be more beneficial for children’s learning (e.g., Tools of the Mind; Bodrova & Leong, 2009; Vygotsky, 1978). But little is known about whether this assumption is accurate.
In the few empirical studies examining free and guided play, researchers have failed to answer important basic questions about similarities and differences between these play contexts. For example, children’s experiences with different activities and peers are believed to provide variety in learning opportunities and foster different developmental skills (e.g., Bredekamp & Copple, 1997). To understand this variation, research examining how children’s experiences with activities and peers vary across free and guided play is needed. Armed with this type of knowledge, recommendations can be made how to effectively use free play and guided play.
The goal of our study was to gain a better understanding of the similarities and differences between free and guided play. We used naturalistic observations to explore how much time children spent in each type of play, and recorded the types and quality of experiences with activities and peers that occurred most frequently in free and guided play.
Method. Head Start preschoolers (N = 282, M = 52 months; 48% girls) were observed in 10-sec intervals several times per week during free and guided play over the fall and spring semesters of one academic year. A total of 64,600 observations (M = 229.20 per child) were collected. Several aspects of play were recorded, including: context (free play or guided play), types of activities (e.g., books, blocks), types of social interactions (dyadic versus group), quality of activity engagement (e.g., constructive, creative), and quality of peer interactions (e.g., parallel, social).
Results. Children spent the majority of their time engaged in play, with significantly more time spent in guided (35%) than in free play (26%; p < .001). Multivariate repeated measures analyses of variance revealed that during free play, compared to guided play, children played with a wider variety of activities and with a more diverse set of peers. Furthermore, play with activities and peers was of higher quality (i.e., more creative and social) during free play, compared to guided play (see Table 1 and 2).
Discussion. In this study, free play may seem more beneficial than guided play; however, recent research has shown that neither time spent in free play nor guided play was positively related to children’s academic, affective, or social skill development (Goble, in preparation). Thus, linking free play and guided play to child outcomes may be more complicated than simply understanding which context provides more of the experiences thought to be related to children’s learning and development. Directions for future research and implications for practice will be discussed.

2016 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Berke, Collin. "“HE COULD. GO. ALL. THE WAY!”: An Examination of The Cognitive Processing Behind Play-by-Play Announcers Voice Presentation." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1115193_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Submission (STUDENT)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The following is an extended abstract describing research in progress examining the effects play-by-play announcer's voice change (pitch and volume) has on audience's cognitive and affective processing of media messages. Specifically, this proposed study uses the Dynamic Human Centric Communication Systems Theory (DHCCST; Lang, 2015) to make predictions of audiences attention and memory toward changes in play-by-play announcing. The proposed method for this study is a 2 (Level of Fanship) x 2 (Volume Change) x 3 (Pitch Change) mixed model experimental design. Secondary task reactions times (STRTs) will be used as the operationalization of audience attention. Both theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

2017 - Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting Words: 196 words || 
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4. Diaz-Varela, Andrea. and Patel, Brijpal. "Results from an Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) of primary students in Mali exposed to Right To Play's play-based learning methodology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting, Sheraton Atlanta Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, Mar 05, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1217404_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A growing body of research over the last decade and a half is highlighting how play-based learning, when applied effectively in the classroom, improves academic performance (Bailey et al 2009, Center for Disease Control and Prevention 2010, Stead and Neville 2010, McCracken and Colucci 2014). Less research has been conducted in the developing world or in crisis and conflict settings. This paper presents the results of an assessment of literacy acquisition in students taught by teachers trained in Right To Play’s play-based learning methodology in Mali. The EGRA (Early Grade Reading Assessment) was used to assess Malian Grade 1 and Grade 3 students learning to read in French in seven Right To Play partner schools, compared against a control group. Students from Right To Play partner schools outperformed the control group for all six EGRA analyses. Patterns of correlations among the tasks and between pre-identified variables were examined. The study was conducted in June 2016 by the Pedagogical Research and Evaluation Division of the Malian Ministry of Education in Mali. Support for the study was provided by Global Affairs Canada in the context of Right To Play’s “Play for the Advancement of Quality Education” program (2015-2017).

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Hadj-Moussa, Ratiba. and Ben Romdhane, Samar. "Playing Identity, Playing Politics: The Tunisian Ennahdha in Tunisia during the Constituent Assembly" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1253548_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 2011, Tunisia experienced major shifts in its political structure during what is widely called the Arab Spring. The Tunisian Islamist party Harakat Ennahdha (Renaissance Movement) was a suprising element in the period following the popular uprising in the country. Its strong return to Tunisia’s public scene amazed many observers, disoriented a certain number of Tunisians who thought it was dead, and mobilized civil society members opposed to its positions. In this paper, we seek to provide an interpretation of the ways in wich the party and its supporters have used social media to disassemble, deny and give their own vision of Tunisianess or being Tunisian as well as how they bring to the foreground the identity issues at work in Tunisian society and during the debate in the Constituent Assembly. The Ennahdha party has been called into question, has been challenged by its political opponents and has been rejected by a large part of “civil society,” who sees it as fatal to freedom. This position, which emerged among Tunisian elites during the Bourguiba and Ben Ali regimes, has created the specter of an alien party, by its values and practices, that has haunted post-revolutionary Tunisia. Ennahdha raises thus the issue of the place of religion in the political life of a country in the process of establishing the rules of democracy, and this within a regional and global context where there is a mostly combative view of Islam.

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