Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 34,249 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 6850 - Next  Jump:
2012 - ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 249 words || 
Info
1. Reichert, Frank. "Cognitive Politicization and Political Action: Pathways of Political Interest and Political Competence to Political Action" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting, Mart Plaza, Chicago, IL, Jul 06, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562790_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Human behavior is only partly based on reflective thinking whereas many, especially cognitive less demanding activities may be initiated in a habitual way (e.g., Strack/Deutsch 2004). Since so called conventional political activities require more (not only cognitive) efforts (e.g., long-term obligation) than unconventional or electoral political participation which is mostly less binding and more event-related, it comes to mind that the latter are activated via an "affective" pathway while conventional action probably requires a reflective behavioral system. As political interest orders people's impulses (e.g., Herbart 1806) it should be a powerful predictor of unconventional and electoral political activity. For conventional participation, however, reflection and thus (subjective) political competence (i.e., internal political efficacy) might be necessary, possibly supplemented by political interest. This assumption is followed using an online panel sample of Turkish migrants in Germany, comparing it with a non-migrant sample. Therefore, multiple regression analyses are used and complemented by multivariate analyses employing more complex path models. For the migrant sample, results point to the overwhelming importance of political interest in the prediction of legal political activity. In regard to conventional political activity, both variables of cognitive politicization have only indirect effects that are mediated via readiness to participate in conventional political action. For non-migrants, however, readiness to participate has no predictive relevance. Adding to that, here subjective political competence seems to be of more predictive value than political interest. These (differing) patterns are confronted with each other, focusing on the importance of political action and societal integration of migrants.

2013 - ISPP 36th Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 234 words || 
Info
2. Reichert, Frank. "Cognitive Politicization and Political Action: How Political Interest and Political Competence affect Political Action" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 36th Annual Scientific Meeting, Lauder School of Government, Diplomacy and Strategy, IDC–Herzliya, Herzliya, Israel, Jul 04, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p646093_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Human behavior is only partly based on reflective thinking whereas many activities might be initiated habitually. Since “conventional” political activities require more efforts than unconventional or electoral political participation, the latter might be activated via an “affective” pathway represented by political interest (Hypothesis I). In contrast, conventional action probably requires a reflective behavioral system. Subjective political competence (i.e., internal political efficacy) is thus hypothesized to be a necessary precondition to initiate conventional participation (Hypothesis II), possibly supplemented by political interest. Both assumptions are followed using an online panel sample of Turkish migrants in Germany, comparing it with non-migrants. Therefore, multiple regression analyses are used and complemented with complex path models and qualitative interviews. Regarding the Turkish migrants, first results support Hypothesis I and indicate the importance of political interest in predicting legal political activity (voting, conventional, and unconventional action). With regard to conventional action, preliminary analyses show partial evidence for Hypothesis II: both variables of cognitive politicization have indirect effects being mediated via readiness to participate in conventional political action. In contrast, for non-migrants subjective political competence seems to be of more predictive value than political interest. Yet there is limited evidence with regard to both hypotheses in the comparison sample. These differing patterns are going to be examined in more detail using a large sample from the German Longitudinal Election Study to discussing the importance of political action and societal integration of migrants.

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 227 words || 
Info
3. Schoolman, Morton. "Possible Politics: Politics of the Image vs. Politics of Narrative Structure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1243715_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Political theorists should break with a long-standing practice of those writing about the politics of film, namely understanding the politics of film through interpretations confined to their narrative structures. This approach privileges narrative to the neglect of legitimate political possibilities belonging to the images of which a film's narrative consists or interprets the politics of images in terms of the overriding political meaning of film narrative. Images often challenge politics attributed to a film's narrative structure, whereas narratology buries the politics of the image beneath the politics of the film narrative. But it is also to be recognized that the image owes its existence to the narrative structure of film. What is thus required is that our recovery of the politics of the image in film account for two things. On the one hand, for the political work the image performs independently of a film's narrative and, on the other, for the work the narrative and the image perform together. It is not simply a matter, in other words, of showing the politics of the image to be at odds with the politics of a film's narrative. Only by showing the image to be potentially at odds while also continuous with the film narrative to which it generically belongs can we appreciate how the image represents a possible politics emerging within though also against film’s narrative structure.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8608 words || 
Info
4. Maurer, Peter. "In the Grip of Politics? How Political Journalists in France and Germany Perceive Political Influence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/X-DOWNLOAD>. 2019-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p984964_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigates how high-ranking political journalists in France and Germany perceive strength of political influence on their work. The journalists’ assessments were collected in a quantitative survey (N = 284) using equivalent measures. Two forms of influence are distinguished: influence on political coverage and influence flowing from the exigency of having political orientations in line with political sources for successful interaction. The study probed several hypotheses pertaining to determinants of perceived influence. Journalists’ individual characteristics and the national context were relevant for explaining the perceptions. The most interesting findings are, first, that contact with PR staff rather than with elected politicians inspires the journalists’ feelings of being influenced. Second, the French context, which was expected to foster perceived political influence, did so only with respect to perceived influence on the coverage but reduced such perceptions as regards interactions. Role conceptions also mattered but the type of medium did not.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 10207 words || 
Info
5. Kwak, Nojin., Lane, Daniel., Weeks, Brian., Kim, Dam Hee., Lee, Slgi. and Bachleda, Sarah. "Does Social Media Matter?: How perceptions of political participation on social media can facilitate political expression and foster offline political participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282036_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Americans’ views of political activity on social media range from exuberant to exasperated. But does the way citizens perceive social media influence their online and offline political behaviors? While the popular narrative of “Slacktivism” suggests that perceiving social media as an easy and impactful way to engage in politics only leads individuals to disengage from traditional forms of political participation, a comprehensive empirical investigation has yet to be undertaken. In the present study, we propose and test a theoretical model in which perceiving social media as context for politics encourages individuals to express themselves on social media, which in turn increases the likelihood that they will participate offline. Our results demonstrate that perceiving social media as easy or impactful can indirectly increase offline political participation, through the influence of political expression on social media. Further, we highlight that this mediated path is stronger for older individuals and less impactful for younger individuals. We also find that those with predominantly politically like-minded networks are more likely to benefit from this process. The implications for reconceptualizing the relationship between perceptions and political participation in the context of social media are discussed.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 6850 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy