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2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5964 words || 
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1. Cossman, Jeralynn. and Cossman, Ronald. "Are Mixing Populations Healthier Than Stable Populations? A County-Level Analysis of Mortality and Population Mixing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107109_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Population migration can have dramatic health effects (e.g., the Spanish introduction of smallpox to New World inhabitants). Health effects can also be subtle, especially given the long latency of diseases such as cancers. Separately, places in the U.S. may be ranked as persistently healthy and unhealthy places, based on a variety of health measures. As such, we investigate how socioeconomic factors and population migration relate to the relative health of these counties. Assessment of the stable population is necessary to correctly determine the “at-risk” population for either the incidence or prevalence of morbidity/mortality within a population. Further, understanding population migration flows can reveal the role that place versus the population or community play in morbidity and mortality outcomes. Using mortality as a health outcome and socioeconomic factors as controls, we test the importance of county-level population stability and in-migration. Population in-migration is negatively associated with mortality rates except in already unhealthy places, while population stability (non-movers) is positively associated with mortality rates no matter how counties are grouped. This finding supports previous research from other countries, indicating that healthy people move from unhealthy places while unhealthy people remain in unhealthy places. This is also supportive of parallel research in the migration patterns of the poor, in which migration is found to maintain and reinforce spatial concentrations of poverty. We conclude that migration and stability reinforce the health status of county populations and plan to examine in more detail the migration patterns among healthy and unhealthy places in future research.

2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 11456 words || 
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2. Toft, Monica. "Population Shifts and Civil War: A Test of Power Transition Theory Population Shifts and Civil War: A Test of Power Transition Theory Population Shifts and Civil War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72013_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper presents a test of elements of Power Transition Theory (PTT) through an examination of types of demographic transitions against civil war. It divides population transitions into nine types and, from PTT logic, derives testable hypotheses. It also tests elements of PTT's rival, Balance of Power Theory (BPT). Although the logic of PTT seems appropriate to testing at the substate level, the results are mixed. Most states plagued by ethnic civil wars have stable populations (i.e. no transitions), yet three types of transitions stand out. Even here, however, PTT predicts violence in only one of these three types of transitions. BPT fares a bit better.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 7486 words || 
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3. Banducci, Susan. and Karp, Jeffrey. "Increasing Political Rights for Indigenous Populations: Comparing Support among Majority Populations in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p60620_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines attitudes toward policies intended to enhance the political rights
and representation of indigenous populations. The analysis is based on a parallel set of questions about the under-representation and the expansion of rights for minority groups that were asked of populations in three countries. Election studies administered in Australia, Canada and New Zealand asked respondents a series of questions regarding support for government assistance for aborigines, self-government, and guaranteed representation. We examine several explanations for variations in the support of majority populations for these policies. Specifically, we examine how perceptions of threat, values such as post-materialism and personal identity structure preferences for the expansion of rights. The paper ends with a discussion of the implications of the results for building support for expansion of political rights for indigenes.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6966 words || 
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4. Thompson, Victor. "Population Projections of the Mixed Race Population, 2000-2055" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p565946_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I construct a set of population projections that provide a detailed look at the distribution of the multiracial population in the United States from 2000-2055. The population projections vary from other projections in that the projections presented in this paper projected a set of racial groups that included a subset of the mixed race population. They are revealing in several ways. First, they explore the full impact of the modern census practice of allowing the expression of mixed race identities on the Census. Second, by including the mixed race population these projections allow demographers and policy makers to view the outcome of current racial and ethnic compositional effects on future racial and ethnic compositions. Finally, they show the effects of immigration and intermarriage rates on the size of different racial and ethnic groups. These more detailed projections of the multiracial population provide a useful starting point for thinking about the future of multiracial identity in the United States.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4732 words || 
Info
5. Romanus, Amy. "What is the Relationship of the Population Changes in Texas due to Population Dynamics?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724466_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Globalization is not just an economic phenomenon, as flows of capital goods and services cannot take place without parallel flows of ideas, cultural values and people. In thinking globally, one needs to take into account the economic, educational, and social transformations taking place in our diverse society due to globalization. This report will first briefly define the terminology of nation-state versus globalization; next, this report will discuss the changing population dynamics in Texas; then, a brief explanation of economic flows will be introduced universally as well as particularly; and; finally, this report will present some of the implications for Texas education using a nation-state ideological mechanism versus a globalization system of ideology.
Hobsbawm, (1975); and Massey & Pren (2012) posit that migration is clearly a systematic element in the processes of globalization, but this is merely a new form of a systematic element that has existed in various guises ever since the beginnings of the global market place, around the sixteenth century. Thus, understanding the key role of population mobility and its effects are important for assessing future perspectives in globalization.
To what extent will migrant settlement, education, employment, and community formation change under conditions of globalization in Texas? What will be the effects on social relations, culture identity and politics and education in Texas? How will Texas seek to incorporate minorities and manage diversity within an ever-changing population while also incorporating a globalization perspective in education, economics and politics?

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