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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 491 words || 
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1. Li, Yan., Long, Yunyi. and Zhou, Hui. "Parental Popularity Goal Set for Adolescents: Associations with Adolescents’ Popularity Goal, Behaviors, and Popularity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962226_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Social goals are important to adolescents’ behavioral development, peer relations, and social-emotional adjustment (Lochman, Wayland, & White, 1993; Ojanen & Nostrand, 2014). As adolescents pay increasing attention to their social standing, they become highly motivated to pursue higher popularity ( Rubin, Bukowski, & Parker, 2006). Recent studies have explored adolescents’ social goals particularly pertinent to popularity showing that popularity goal is related to adolescents’ behaviors and peer status (Dawes & Xie, 2013; Li & Wright, 2014). Despite these research advances, the current literature lacks critical information regarding the processes that may influence adolescents’ formation of popularity goal. Parents are adolescents’ important socialization agents and may influence adolescents’ goal setting in peer interactions. Utilizing a longitudinal design, this study examines how parents’ popularity goal set for their adolescents is linked to adolescents’ own popularity goal, behaviors, and popularity status.

Participants were 449 adolescents (250 girls) from 7th and 8th grades of one public middle school in China and 214 (151 mothers, 59 fathers, and 4 other guardians) parents of those adolescents. Among those 449 adolescents, 387 of them participated in the study again six months later. At both time points, adolescents’ popularity goal was measured by the six-item Popularity Goal measure (Li & Wright, 2014; e.g., “I want to be more popular among my peers”.) At Time 1 (T1), both parents’ popularity goal for children and adolescents’ perceptions of parental popularity goal were assessed by the items adapted from the Popularity Goal measure (e.g., “I want my child/my parents want me to be more popular among his/her/my peers”). Adolescents’ popularity status at Time 1 and Time 2 (T2) was assessed using popularity/unpopularity nominations. Additionally, adolescents’ overt aggression, relational aggression, and prosocial behavior were assessed by both self-reports and peer nominations at both time points.
The correlation results (see Table 1) showed that that parental popularity goal set for adolescents at T1 was positively related to adolescents’ perceived parental popularity goal at T1 and adolescents’ popularity goal at T2. Adolescents’ perceived parental popularity goal at T1 was also positively related to adolescents’ popularity goals at both time points. Furthermore, adolescents’ T1 popularity goal was positively correlated with their popularity status at both time points as well as peer-nominated relational aggression and self-reported prosocial behavior at both time points. Parental popularity goal was also linked to adolescents’ T1 peer-nominated overt aggression and T2 self-reported prosocial behavior. Additionally, some preliminary regression results showed that T1 parental popularity goal for adolescents significantly predicted T2 adolescents’ popularity goal after controlling for their T1 popularity goal (β = .26, p < .01; R2 = .28, p < .01). These preliminary results demonstrate links between parental goal set for their children’s popularity and adolescents’ own goal setting as well as behavioral and popularity outcomes. More advanced analyses testing hypotheses for the present study will be conducted and reported. Findings of this study will enhance our understanding of the processes informing the formation of adolescents’ popularity goal and their peer interactions.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7516 words || 
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2. Ryalls, Emily. "“Beautiful, Popular, Loved, Feared” : A Genealogy of Popular Girls in Popular Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p488637_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The “truth” about “mean girls” who bully has become an accepted fact in U.S. society today. In order to uncover how we have arrived to contemporary ideas about mean girls, this paper attempts a genealogy of girlhood. Foucault conceives of genealogy as a method to trace the development of society through knowledge and discourse. A genealogy provides access to ideas we tend to feel are without history, such as ideas about girls who are mean. This paper examines the constitution of girlhood and popularity through three girlhood discourses – Reviving Ophelia, Girl Power, and Mean Girl. Because popularity in films is typically coded White, middle to upper class, and heterosexual, in order to access contemporary societal concern about girls and popularity, this genealogy is of troubled White middle to upper-class heterosexual popular girls. This paper illuminates how regressive the mean girl images are, dismissing the necessity for girls’ empowerment, and retreating to historically dominant expectations of femininity.

2010 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Pages: unavailable || Words: 2703 words || 
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3. de Lima, Maria Helena. and Beyer, Esther. "The Project “Music and Citizenship” with Brazilian Communities: Music Education, Popular Education & Popular Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, China Conservatory of Music (CC) and Chinese National Convention Centre (CNCC), Beijing, China, Aug 01, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398467_index.html>
Publication Type: Full Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper was created as an overview of 10 years of educational activity of the Music and Citizenship Project within communities in the urban periphery of cities in the Southern region of Brazil. Its origins, objectives in the artistic, educational, and citizenship realms were discussed. The partnership, results, and indicators were shown as based upon Paulo Freire´s proposal in Popular Education, Dialogical Education and Problem solving theory. During these 10 years, the Music and Citizenship Project (MCP) has sought to base its music education practice upon an investigative and dialogical proposal considering Brazilian culture and local knowledge as sources of inspiration in musical education. Also, believing music is an object of reflection and its content being linked to social issues of the context within the community, country, and worldwide. In this sense, the Project outlines the value of the educator as researcher in their praxis besides their role creating incentives for the student to exercise a protagonist posture in educational spaces and moments, applying this posture to real life situations.
In this work, we described the cultural context of the communities in which this Project was applied: afro-Brazilian communities and its syncretism with the indigenous and European cultures in urban peripheries in southern Brazil and the value of collective characteristics and manifestation in music and dance. We stressed that this initiative can be applied in any cultural context, for its basis is respect for local manifestation and reference of the participants. Attention was given to the importance of the NGOs, community associations, and social projects in the national sense and possible dialogues and contributions with formal education of music in the schools.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8142 words || 
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4. Lim, Joon Soo. and Yang, Sung-Un. "Being Popular While Being Authentic: The Need for Popularity and Authenticity Among Microblogging Users" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p640087_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of the current study is to develop a measure of online authenticity scale (OAS) and test whether online authenticity is related to the need for popularity. The OAS was designed to assess the a priori bipartite conceptions of online authenticity. Drawing on a representative sample from Me2Day, a popular microblogging site in South Korea, we tested the construct validity of online authenticity scale composed of 15 items. Exploratory factor analysis followed by confirmatory factor analysis validated two factors that underlie microblogging users’ authenticity: sense of real me (SRME) and expression of real me (ERME). Finally, a structural equation model that examined the relationship between online authenticity and users’ need for popularity (NFP) was proposed. This SEM analysis revealed that NFP was strongly associated with both dimensions of online authenticity.

2015 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 247 words || 
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5. Ingham, Sean. "Popular control without a popular will" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 15, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p949321_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Popular control over government is often identified with control by majorities. As Tocqueville put it, “...in all countries where the people reign, the majority rules in the name of people.” The definite article in formulations like Tocqueville’s obscures an important fact: any group of people contains multiple majorities. Moreover, the wishes of different majorities may be incompatible. They may not add up to a coherent “majority will,” as Condorcet’s paradox and other insights from social choice theory demonstrate.

The paper takes this fact as its point of departure and lays out a novel theory of what it means for majorities to have control over policy. According to the theory, a majority has control when its influence over policy ensures an outcome that its members find not too much worse than any alternative.

The first, analytical section of the paper explains how majorities may have control over policy even if there is no well-defined “will of the majority” or popular will. I also show that under certain assumptions an egalitarian “invisible hand” result obtains: giving majorities maximal control over redistributive policy in the specified sense would tend to produce equitable distributions of wealth, even if everyone has purely selfish preferences.

The second, normative section of the paper presents reasons for finding this interpretation of popular control appealing. I argue, in particular, that it represents a more plausible account of what the republican ideal of non-domination requires than Pettit’s (2013) conception of popular control.

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