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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 491 words || 
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1. Li, Yan., Long, Yunyi. and Zhou, Hui. "Parental Popularity Goal Set for Adolescents: Associations with Adolescents’ Popularity Goal, Behaviors, and Popularity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962226_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Social goals are important to adolescents’ behavioral development, peer relations, and social-emotional adjustment (Lochman, Wayland, & White, 1993; Ojanen & Nostrand, 2014). As adolescents pay increasing attention to their social standing, they become highly motivated to pursue higher popularity ( Rubin, Bukowski, & Parker, 2006). Recent studies have explored adolescents’ social goals particularly pertinent to popularity showing that popularity goal is related to adolescents’ behaviors and peer status (Dawes & Xie, 2013; Li & Wright, 2014). Despite these research advances, the current literature lacks critical information regarding the processes that may influence adolescents’ formation of popularity goal. Parents are adolescents’ important socialization agents and may influence adolescents’ goal setting in peer interactions. Utilizing a longitudinal design, this study examines how parents’ popularity goal set for their adolescents is linked to adolescents’ own popularity goal, behaviors, and popularity status.

Participants were 449 adolescents (250 girls) from 7th and 8th grades of one public middle school in China and 214 (151 mothers, 59 fathers, and 4 other guardians) parents of those adolescents. Among those 449 adolescents, 387 of them participated in the study again six months later. At both time points, adolescents’ popularity goal was measured by the six-item Popularity Goal measure (Li & Wright, 2014; e.g., “I want to be more popular among my peers”.) At Time 1 (T1), both parents’ popularity goal for children and adolescents’ perceptions of parental popularity goal were assessed by the items adapted from the Popularity Goal measure (e.g., “I want my child/my parents want me to be more popular among his/her/my peers”). Adolescents’ popularity status at Time 1 and Time 2 (T2) was assessed using popularity/unpopularity nominations. Additionally, adolescents’ overt aggression, relational aggression, and prosocial behavior were assessed by both self-reports and peer nominations at both time points.
The correlation results (see Table 1) showed that that parental popularity goal set for adolescents at T1 was positively related to adolescents’ perceived parental popularity goal at T1 and adolescents’ popularity goal at T2. Adolescents’ perceived parental popularity goal at T1 was also positively related to adolescents’ popularity goals at both time points. Furthermore, adolescents’ T1 popularity goal was positively correlated with their popularity status at both time points as well as peer-nominated relational aggression and self-reported prosocial behavior at both time points. Parental popularity goal was also linked to adolescents’ T1 peer-nominated overt aggression and T2 self-reported prosocial behavior. Additionally, some preliminary regression results showed that T1 parental popularity goal for adolescents significantly predicted T2 adolescents’ popularity goal after controlling for their T1 popularity goal (β = .26, p < .01; R2 = .28, p < .01). These preliminary results demonstrate links between parental goal set for their children’s popularity and adolescents’ own goal setting as well as behavioral and popularity outcomes. More advanced analyses testing hypotheses for the present study will be conducted and reported. Findings of this study will enhance our understanding of the processes informing the formation of adolescents’ popularity goal and their peer interactions.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7516 words || 
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2. Ryalls, Emily. "“Beautiful, Popular, Loved, Feared” : A Genealogy of Popular Girls in Popular Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p488637_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The “truth” about “mean girls” who bully has become an accepted fact in U.S. society today. In order to uncover how we have arrived to contemporary ideas about mean girls, this paper attempts a genealogy of girlhood. Foucault conceives of genealogy as a method to trace the development of society through knowledge and discourse. A genealogy provides access to ideas we tend to feel are without history, such as ideas about girls who are mean. This paper examines the constitution of girlhood and popularity through three girlhood discourses – Reviving Ophelia, Girl Power, and Mean Girl. Because popularity in films is typically coded White, middle to upper class, and heterosexual, in order to access contemporary societal concern about girls and popularity, this genealogy is of troubled White middle to upper-class heterosexual popular girls. This paper illuminates how regressive the mean girl images are, dismissing the necessity for girls’ empowerment, and retreating to historically dominant expectations of femininity.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 126 words || 
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3. Fahmy, Chantal. "Popular Music and Popular Drugs: The Impact of Illicit Substance References on America’s Youth in the Millennium" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p586582_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Popular music has played an instrumental role in youth culture for many years. Many argue that the constant reference to illicit substances in lyrics shapes the minds of youth, often generating subliminal messages about acceptable and common behaviors. Although various studies have described the possible negative impact of specific genres of music on youth in the decades of the 20th century, this study concentrates on the millennium. From 2000 to 2011, a content analysis of the lyrics of Billboard's "Hot 100" is conducted. The lyrics of these top 40, cross-genre songs with the most radio airplay and digital downloads from each year are analyzed to assess the amount and the representation of illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco (stated both implicitly and explicitly).

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 8837 words || 
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4. Ochoa Espejo, Paulina. "What is a People? Popular Sovereignty and the Indeterminacy of Popular Unification" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p209841_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: There is a problem in all contemporary theories of popular sovereignty. These theories argue that a state can be legitimate only if the people have a unified will, but they cannot show that the people are unified at any given time. Sometimes these theories posit unity in the future, sometimes in the past, but never in the present where they insist it must be. I call this problem the indeterminacy of popular unification. Since Rousseau first noted and struggled with it, many political theorists have been aware of this problem; but none has ever solved it. This paper argues that this problem can be solved provided that we concieve of the people as a process, rather than as a collection of individuals or a unified person. The people thus conceived is a source of legitimacy that moors state institutions, but is now infused with change, surprise and innovation.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 9250 words || 
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5. van Venrooij, Alex. and Schmutz, Vaughn. "The Evaluation of Popular Music in Comparative Perspective: American, German, and Dutch Popular Music Reviews" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p171780_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Over the past 50 years, popular music has received increasing editorial space in American and European newspapers and has apparently gained in status and artistic legitimacy, though the degree of change varies across countries (Janssen et al., 2005). Some have argued that popular music criticism has assimilated the evaluative criteria traditionally associated with high art aesthetics, while others have claimed that popular music discourse opposes the evaluative principles of high art worlds in favor of a “popular aesthetic”. Just as increases in editorial space for popular music vary across countries, we expect that the presence of “high art” and “popular” aesthetic criteria in popular music reviews also varies cross-nationally. In this paper, we compare the prevalence of various high art and popular evaluative criteria in popular music album reviews in American, Dutch, and German newspapers. In the US, the boundary between high art and popular aesthetics appears to be weakest, with most popular music reviews drawing on both types of criteria. We find that German reviewers generally take the most high art approach to popular music reviews and use the least popular aesthetic criteria, while Dutch reviews clearly favor the popular aesthetic over high art criteria.

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