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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Jeon, Shinyoung. and Neppl, Tricia. "Economic Hardship, Parental Positivity and Positive Parenting across Generations: The Impact on Child Positive Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958613_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: According to the Family Stress Model, economic pressure caused by economic hardship leads to emotional problems such as depression and anxiety, which can result in marital conflict, hostile parenting behaviors, and negative child outcomes (Conger & Conger, 2002; Conger, Conger, & Martin, 2010). While economic hardship is associated with negative family functioning (Brooks-Gunn & Duncan, 1997; Duncan & Brooks-Gunn, 2000; Elder, 1974; Elder, Nguyen, & Caspi, 1985), some families adapt and function well despite experiencing economic adversity. Researchers have begun to examine possible reasons why some people are more resilient to the effects of economic hardship (Bonanno, 2004; Conger & Conger, 2002; Masten, 2001). As such, the current study examined the association between economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting practices across two generations. We also examined how this continuity is associated with positive behavior of the third generation child. This provides an important step in understanding how positivity and positive parenting are transmitted across generations to impact child development in those families affected by economic hardship.
Data comes from the Family Transitions Project (FTP) which is a longitudinal study of 559 target youth and their families. The present study included 220 generation one (G1) parents, their target youth (Generation two: G2) who participated from adolescence through adulthood, and the third generation child (G3) who participated in the study by 2005. The data were analyzed using two developmental time periods. Time 1 examined G1 economic hardship, G1 parent positivity, and G1 positive parenting when G2 youth were in adolescence (age 15-16). Time 2 included G2 economic hardship, G2 positivity and G2 positive parenting during adulthood and included data from the first time their G3 child participated between the ages of 3 and 5 years old.
G1 parents reported on project derived measures of economic hardship, as well as various dimensions of positivity including positive emotion (NEO), self-mastery (Pearlin, Meneghan, Lieberman, Mullan, 1981), and self-esteem (Rosenberg, 1965). G2 target adults reported on economic hardship, various dimensions of positivity such as positive affect (Rand Health Science Program, 1986), self-mastery and coping (Conger, 1993). Observer ratings were used to assess both G1 and G2 positive parenting which included parental warmth, communication, listener responsiveness, assertiveness, and prosocial behavior toward their child. The same indicators from observer ratings regarding G3 behaviors toward the parent were also used to assess G3 positive behavior.
Data were analyzed using Mplus Version 7 (Muthén & Muthén, 2006) FIML procedures. There was intergenerational continuity of economic hardship, positivity and positive parenting from G1 to G2 (Figure 1). G1 economic hardship impacted G1 parental positivity which, in turn, affected G1 positive parenting, while G2 economic hardship impacted both G2 parent positivity and G2 positive parenting. Finally, G2 positive parenting strongly predicted G3 positive behavior. In both generations parent positivity resulted in positive parenting. Results will be discussed in terms of the transmission of positivity and positive parenting on child development in spite of economic hardship across generations.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 5839 words || 
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2. Wilkins, Karin. "Confronting the Missionary Position: The Mission of Development/ The Position of Women" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p68227_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this analysis, I focus on how the development project has engaged concerns with women, gender, and feminism. First, I address the notion of a central “mission” in development work, toward improving women's conditions and recognizing gender and feminist concerns. In the next section, I consider the “position” of women as a consequence of this process, in terms of their passive roles, valued in terms of their reproduction, sexuality, and victimization. Finally, I consider options, based in feminist critiques, toward confronting the missionary position of development programs targeting women.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 36 words || 
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3. Grose, Christian. "Why do Legislators Take Positions Contrary to their Constituents? An Examination of Homeland Security and Domestic Policy and Legislators? Conflicting Positions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85989_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Did legislators in the 107th Congress take positions on homeland security in order to diverge from their constituents? preferences on domestic policy? We present comparable estimates of MC and constituency ideal points in the 107th.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 10512 words || 
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4. Lutgen-Sandvik, Pamela., Riforgiate, Sarah. and Fletcher, Courtney. "Work as a Source of Positive Emotional Experiences and the Discourses Informing Positive Assessment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p364610_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines 897 U.S. workers’ open-ended survey responses to the prompt “Please describe your best workplace experience.” Through these accounts, we develop a typology of best-job experiences and move beyond this to explore the discourses of meaning likely to engender positive assessment of these experiences. Our work underscores the notion that positive work experiences and the emotions these evoke are inherently communicative and transactional phenomena

2012 - 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies Pages: unavailable || Words: 254 words || 
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5. Etta, Elizabeth. "Speaking Our Language: Positive Steps for a Positive Future" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Mar 07, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p551469_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The education gap in today’s African American youth is a highly debated and theorized topic. This gap accounts for the perpetuation of the poverty cycle and the often illegal and immoral activities that accompany a life in such dire conditions. While placing blame with the family unit as a whole is the common consensus, the language spoken in these units is not conducive to the educational process. Black English Vernacular (BEV), or African American Vernacular English (AAVE), is the common language ascribed to African Americans and this language has the potential to create both comprehension and oral participation issues in the Standard American English (SAE) speaking classroom.
This presentation will focus on the sociological and psychological implications of teaching youth in the language that they understand. In my research, I will analyze both past and present scholarly studies, essays from both the African diaspora and realm of social science, and articles pertaining to current events to further the notion of BEV/AAVE’s importance in education. My sources include primarily the Public Broadcast Station, the Coalition on Language Diversity in Education, and studies from prestigious universities such as University of Michigan and Stanford University. It is crucial to all African Americans that our children will not only advance in school but advance in today’s society as future career professionals. This multilevel advancement will be achieved by welcoming the common language of the student and assist in another step forward in the upward progression of the black community.

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