Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,005 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 401 - Next  Jump:
2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Jeon, Shinyoung. and Neppl, Tricia. "Economic Hardship, Parental Positivity and Positive Parenting across Generations: The Impact on Child Positive Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958613_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: According to the Family Stress Model, economic pressure caused by economic hardship leads to emotional problems such as depression and anxiety, which can result in marital conflict, hostile parenting behaviors, and negative child outcomes (Conger & Conger, 2002; Conger, Conger, & Martin, 2010). While economic hardship is associated with negative family functioning (Brooks-Gunn & Duncan, 1997; Duncan & Brooks-Gunn, 2000; Elder, 1974; Elder, Nguyen, & Caspi, 1985), some families adapt and function well despite experiencing economic adversity. Researchers have begun to examine possible reasons why some people are more resilient to the effects of economic hardship (Bonanno, 2004; Conger & Conger, 2002; Masten, 2001). As such, the current study examined the association between economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting practices across two generations. We also examined how this continuity is associated with positive behavior of the third generation child. This provides an important step in understanding how positivity and positive parenting are transmitted across generations to impact child development in those families affected by economic hardship.
Data comes from the Family Transitions Project (FTP) which is a longitudinal study of 559 target youth and their families. The present study included 220 generation one (G1) parents, their target youth (Generation two: G2) who participated from adolescence through adulthood, and the third generation child (G3) who participated in the study by 2005. The data were analyzed using two developmental time periods. Time 1 examined G1 economic hardship, G1 parent positivity, and G1 positive parenting when G2 youth were in adolescence (age 15-16). Time 2 included G2 economic hardship, G2 positivity and G2 positive parenting during adulthood and included data from the first time their G3 child participated between the ages of 3 and 5 years old.
G1 parents reported on project derived measures of economic hardship, as well as various dimensions of positivity including positive emotion (NEO), self-mastery (Pearlin, Meneghan, Lieberman, Mullan, 1981), and self-esteem (Rosenberg, 1965). G2 target adults reported on economic hardship, various dimensions of positivity such as positive affect (Rand Health Science Program, 1986), self-mastery and coping (Conger, 1993). Observer ratings were used to assess both G1 and G2 positive parenting which included parental warmth, communication, listener responsiveness, assertiveness, and prosocial behavior toward their child. The same indicators from observer ratings regarding G3 behaviors toward the parent were also used to assess G3 positive behavior.
Data were analyzed using Mplus Version 7 (Muthén & Muthén, 2006) FIML procedures. There was intergenerational continuity of economic hardship, positivity and positive parenting from G1 to G2 (Figure 1). G1 economic hardship impacted G1 parental positivity which, in turn, affected G1 positive parenting, while G2 economic hardship impacted both G2 parent positivity and G2 positive parenting. Finally, G2 positive parenting strongly predicted G3 positive behavior. In both generations parent positivity resulted in positive parenting. Results will be discussed in terms of the transmission of positivity and positive parenting on child development in spite of economic hardship across generations.

2015 - LRA 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Kim, Jieun. and Porath, Suzanne. "“Positioning-Being Positioned”: A Biracial Student’s Hyphenated Selves in Literacy Classrooms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 65th Annual Conference, Omni La Costa Resort and Spa, Carlsbad, CA, Dec 02, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1028264_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6052 words || 
Info
3. Bianchi, Alison. "Accentuate the Positive: The Effects of Positive Sentiments on the Status Organizing Process" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107090_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Sentiment has been shown to affect status processes, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. This paper presents an experiment with evidence in support of one of two alternative approaches -- sentiments as constituent elements of expectations or sentiments as mediators of expectations -- to conceptualizing the effect of positive sentiments on the status organizing process, as studied within the framework of Expectations States Theory (Fisek and Berger 1998). Subjects’ levels of responsibility for team outcome and sentiment vary between experimental conditions, in accordance with the Camilleri and Berger Model for Decision-Making (1967). Experimental outcomes include subjects’ proportion of stay responses and post-experiment questionnaire items pertaining to affect.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Words: 1 words || 
Info
4. Socha, Thomas. "TOP PAPERS: Building Positive Communication Pedagogy: Positive Experiential Learning in Human Relating" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275232_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 236 words || 
Info
5. Han, Kyung Joon. "Position Blurring as an Electoral Strategy: Voter Polarization, Issue Salience, and Political Parties’ Position Blurring" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 07, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1077624_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Why do political parties sometimes make their issue positions blurred? Also, how does increasing voter polarization, as is observed in many countries in recent decades, affect political parties’ position blurring? We suggest that position blurring is also a part of political parties’ electoral strategies and the effect of voter polarization on position blurring depends on the degree to which political parties put salience on each issue. Using expert survey data and manifesto data on party position and issue salience as well as public opinion data on voter polarization in Western Europe, we find that while political parties facing voter polarization on an issue provide a clear position on the issue when the issue is a salient issue for the parties, they blur their position when their issue salience level regarding the issue is low. In other words, political parties want to hide their real stances on their secondary dimension issues when voters are divided regarding the issues. In contrast, they want to make their stances clear on their primary dimension issues, highlight their differences from other parties, and attract voters when voters are divided. The result implies that issue salience plays an intermediating role between voter polarization and position blurring. In particular, issue salience can prevent voter polarization, which is often negatively related with democratic politics (e.g., political conflict), from bringing in position blurring, which is also often negatively associated with democratic values (e.g., voter representation).

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 401 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.