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2019 - American Sociological Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Cohen, Joseph. and Steele, Liza. "Are Policy Preferences Motivated by Economic Self-Interest? Personal Finances and Preferences for Redistribution in 30 Countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton New York Midtown & Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, New York City, Aug 09, 2019 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1512020_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This analysis probes the relationship between people’s preferences for redistribution and their economic self-interest. We analyze personal finance and political opinion data from 30 countries included in the 2009 ISSP to analyze whether respondents’ personal income, financial wealth, or housing wealth are related to their opinions about economic redistribution, poor aid, and unemployment support. Although we find some very modest evidence of a relationship between income and preferences in liberal welfare states, and between home equity, financial wealth, and preferences in Nordic countries, the limited evidence of broader patterns within our data and the small effect sizes of personal finance measures call into question the importance of these metrics for politics as they are portrayed in popular media.

2008 - International Communication Association Words: 151 words || 
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2. Yang, Grace. and Huesmann, Rowell. "The Relation between Children’s Preferences for Passive and Interactive Violent Media and their Parents’ Media Preferences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232856_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: This study addresses the question of “why individuals are attracted to media violence” by examining relations between media violence use across generations and across modalities, i.e., passive and active media (e.g., television vs. video games) Using structural equation modeling and data from a study of 335 families, we examine relations between two generation’s preferences for violent passive and violent interactive media. Violent television viewing by the first generation positively predicts violent television viewing by both genders in the second generation, but does not predict violent video game playing in either gender. Although males in the second generation prefer more violent television shows and video games than females, liking for violent television viewing is positively correlated with liking for violent video games in both genders. These results suggest that there are characteristic individual differences in preferences for violent media that are transmitted across generations but that depend on availability of media.

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 54 pages || Words: 14625 words || 
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3. Kopko, Kyle. "Group Preferences versus Policy Preferences: An Analysis of Partisanship in Campaign Finance Cases" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p455438_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Judicial behavior scholars have traditionally relied on policy preferences to predict the case votes of judges. Only recently have scholars focused on the potential influence of social groups on a judge’s behavior (e.g., Baum 2006). This paper examines the influence of a salient social in-group, a political party, on the judicial decision-making process, after controlling for a judge’s policy preferences. Specifically, I examine case votes of federal district court and courts of appeals judges between 1971 and 2007 in campaign finance cases to determine if the interests of their political party influence the judicial decision-making process. After controlling for a judge’s policy preferences, I find that policy preferences only influence judicial behavior in cases where there is not a clear stake for a judge's political party. However, when a judge's political party has a stake in a given case, policy preferences no longer influence judicial behavior. Instead, the only statistically significant predictor is the outcome favored by the judge's political party. This study provides empirical evidence of an external group exerting influence on judicial behavior, after controlling for a judge’s policy preferences. Furthermore, such influence raises normative concerns regarding the fair resolution of salient election law cases.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 11092 words || 
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4. van Spanje, Joost. and Burscher, Bjoern. "Do Perceived Poll Results Affect Party Preferences, or Do Party Preferences Affect Perceived Poll Results?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p489833_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It is well established in the literature that a party’s perceived standing in the polls affects voters’ probability to vote for that party. However, do voters perceive a parties’ poll performance in accurate ways, or is there a nonrandom error to poll perceptions? In this paper, we argue that poll perceptions are systematically biased. On the basis of data from a voter survey conducted in four countries (N=22,504) we find for most parties an interplay of poll perceptions and probabilities to vote. Indeed, we more often find probabilities to vote influencing poll perceptions than vice versa. This bias tends to be larger among the lower-educated, and among the less knowledgeable. We conclude by setting our findings in wider perspective and discussing the relevance to the research field, and society more generally.

2014 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 190 words || 
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5. Kwon, Hyeok Yong. "Preferences in Context: How Electoral System Conditions the Union Membership Effect on Preferences for Welfare Spending" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p730040_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Much of the literature on redistributive preferences presumes that social identity collides with economic interest. But, certain social identities may overlap and hence reinforce rather than collides with economic interest. In this paper I argue that union membership, construed as group identity, reinforces economic interest, exerting a positive effect on the demand for redistribution. Furthermore, I argue that this overlapping/reinforcing group identity effect varies, depending on electoral incentives provided by different electoral systems. The union membership effect is expected to be less pronounced in majoritarian system than in proportional representation system. The reason behind this logic is that majoritarian system provides incentives for political parties to adopt electoral strategies targeted to geographically focused constituencies, often times by invoking cross-cutting social identity. Accordingly, the union effect would be subdued relative to other group identity. On the contrary, political competition under PR system is more likely to revolve around universal programmatic policies, strengthening the union membership effect. A series of statistical analysis of individual- and aggregate-level data of advanced democracies finds supporting evidence for my argument: the group identity effect, which does not necessarily collide with economic interest, varies by electoral contexts.

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