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2011 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 196 words || 
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1. Nalley, Elizabeth., Worthen, Kristen. and Swinford, Chase. "Using Nanoparticles Prepared From Organic Dyes to Prepare Faux Stained Glass Windows" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547974_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In an effort to make fun nanoparticle projects for students in a summer science academy in nanotechnology, we followed the procedure from the University of Wisconsin for making gold and silver nanoparticles. These were immobilized in PVA to produce a dye solution which could be applied to glass or Plexiglas that looked like stained glass windows. Incorporation of nanoparticles in glass to make stained glass is a procedure that has been utilized since the Middle Ages. The dye solutions produced by following this procedure were unpredictable, dull and unsuitable for use as stained glass. We then tried using organic dyes in place of the metallic dyes, and found that they gave the intense color that we had been seeking. Since many of the dyes used are food dyes and may actually be safer than metallic dyes. Although the art form product resulting from this research were not colored the same manner as traditional stained glass windows, the colors produced by nanoparticles were very vivid and allowed the light to pass through because of their very small size. These nanodyes and their applications will be discussed

2012 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 1803 words || 
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2. Carver, Cynthia., Abrego, Michelle. and Gimbert, Belinda. "Bringing a Teacher Education Lens to Leadership Preparation: Innovative Coursework in 3 Leadership Preparation Programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Riverwalk Hotel, San Antonio, Texas, Feb 11, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p526293_index.html>
Publication Type: Multiple Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: To effectively support teachers, principals benefit from a deep understanding of curriculum, instruction and teacher development. Come learn how three leadership preparation programs are designing innovative coursework with that goal in mind!

2012 - 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 708 words || 
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3. Roman, Maribel., Burroughs, Greer. and daly, james. "Worldwide revolution: Preparing teacher education candidates to prepare students to learn about the world" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Apr 22, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p551678_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The concept of a worldwide revolution in education is daunting. The contention that the world has changed in response deserves examination, and the current state of and future prospects for such a revolution need to be considered.

In exploring this phenomenon, it is useful to keep in mind the assertion by many that schools do not automatically free students to think and reflect nor even serve the cause of human progress Thus, it is the form and nature of the education that is of prime significance. Otherwise a result can be to intellectually enslave masses of those educated in government schools. This deserves careful reflection by everyone in any given society. It is of particular importance to universities, which serve as producers of those who will teach in and maintain the public schools. What role have the universities played, and what role should they play?

The education revolution is a partner, contributor to, and recipient of the technology revolution that continues to build across the planet. How can schools harness this global force to help societies navigate the inevitable conflicts that emerge as people with different languages, customs and beliefs confront one another? Has the educational aspect of the worldwide revolution addressed a consideration of the global impact of technology on traditional concepts of citizenship? Is part of the increased educational focus on conflict resolution, understanding cultural differences, building tolerance? Should it be? Has schooling as an institution been a conservative force maintaining the status quo and promoting the continuation of the organizing body that promotes it? In this sense the worldwide education revolution may make international understanding and cooperation even more problematic as it creates a sense of nationhood, however defined, that is seamlessly infused throughout the institutional life of all member. Can such an organization resist the forces of inertia and inequality, or does it better prepare its own members to more effectively compete with others for resources? With more of its citizens in schools, governments have a potentially greater impact for transmitting the political agenda of the leadership (often the cultural and economic elite). Even where schooling moves towards providing understanding what can be done to prevent Thermidor from following the Mountain?

Other questions deserving consideration include: Is the worldwide revolution in education over? Have the consequences promoted social justice and the improvement of life for peoples swept up in that revolution? What has been the nature of the revolution – has the formal schooling been a conservative or progressive force, stabilizing and institutionalizing certain cultural patterns and preferences to the exclusion of others? Who has emerged as the directors or primary actors promoting and maintaining the structural components on which the education revolution has been built? What must universities, specifically teacher education programs, do?

The emerging world is characterized by instantaneous and global interaction. Learners need to be able to articulate perceptions that the global audiences with whom they interact may find confusing or wrong. Teacher education programs must respond by embracing new approaches. These programs must engage teacher education candidates in a range of experiences designed to have them consider multiple perspectives, helping them develop the ability to listen accurately before responding to others. Curricula must address conflict resolution skills and dispositions essential to resolving the inevitable disagreements that occur once people from different societies encounter one another, Teacher education programs need to help candidates learn how to critically examine multiple national narratives, considering historiography, analyzing bias, and become open to new possibilities. Technology holds the potential to expand these conversations beyond the walls of classrooms and national borders.

This paper examines the current state of internationalization in teacher education and practices in one teacher education program designed to address many of the challenges cited above. The work involved rethinking practice within the university, as well as moving learning outside of the classroom and the country. A qualitative research methodology was employed to build understandings of the impact of adaptations on teacher candidates. Data from student reflections, observations, surveys and focus group sessions were analyzed. The findings shed insight on practices that are effective in building knowledge, skills and dispositions to enable future teachers to succeed in a global learning environment, the continued challenges in this endeavor and the potential to use technology in this process.

2015 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Black, William., Mann, John. and Burrello, Leonard. "Preparation for Sustainable Leadership: Incorporating Appreciative Inquiry and Appreciative Organizing Across Three Distinct Preparation Programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Manchester Grand Hyatt, San Diego, CA, Nov 17, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1042670_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This session will discuss the ways faculty and district leadership development teams at the University of South Florida came together to challenge deficit orientations and incorporate more sustainable and positive frameworks for leadership preparation and development for challenging school environments through the incorporation of an Appreciative Inquiry (AI) and Appreciative Organizing (AO) approach for aspiring Assistant Principals, aspiring Principals, and experienced Principals.

2015 - LRA 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Bowers-Campbell, Joy. "Online Teacher Preparation: If No One in Space Can Hear You Scream, Is it Really a Place to Prepare Teachers?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 65th Annual Conference, Omni La Costa Resort and Spa, Carlsbad, CA, Dec 02, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1027523_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

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