Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,235 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 247 - Next  Jump:
2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Schafraad, Pytrik. and van zoonen, ward. "Reconsidering Churnalism: How News Factors in Corporate Press Releases Influence the Way Journalists Treat These Press Releases After Initial Selection" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1364981_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines how news factors in press releases influence journalists’ decisions and journalistic treatment of press release information: transforming the press release into a news story (little journalistic capital investment), or use them for a unique independently written story (large journalistic capital investment). The content analysis data show the more profound the presence of certain (but not all) news factors in the press releases, the higher the chance that journalists choose to invest their journalistic capital in them. This means that journalists are only triggered to invest journalistic capital into press releases by specific news factors. This means that within the context of increased influence of information subsidies, journalists do make informed choices concerning their reliance on information subsidies.

2019 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 8032 words || 
Info
2. Shemberger, Melony. "“Ideal Press Work”: The struggles of Kentucky suffrage press superintendents in gaining right to vote and living their lives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Canada, Aug 07, 2019 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1555893_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: State press superintendents in Kentucky performed vital work in women’s suffrage associations. Keeping Kentucky newspapers supplied with ready-to-print material on the women’s suffrage movement, writing original articles, maintaining relationships with newspaper editors, and clipping published material were among the responsibilities and activities of the press superintendents. In April 1898, Jessie Jane Cassidy, press superintendent for the National-American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), wrote a nearly three-page newsletter article describing the importance of “ideal press work” in reaching most U.S. newspapers and citing reasons why “ideal press work” was not being met by the state suffrage associations. This research examines the press work of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association against NAWSA’s “ideal press work” paradigm. Kentucky is the central focus of this study because of the rich digital resources available in obtaining convention reports for most years since the organization’s founding and during the suffrage movement. Overall, Kentucky’s press superintendents had difficulties in meeting the “ideal press work” standard set forth by Cassidy, but progress and achievements were noted, especially during the tenure of Lida Calvert Obenchain. Other variables prevented an “ideal press work” from occurring, such as illness, death and other personal affairs. This examination not only showcases the worthiness of the publicity efforts among suffrage press superintendents in Kentucky, but it also sheds light on the balance these women sought to achieve between gaining their full right to vote and living their lives. This study has implications for today’s women, who face similar struggles in their battles for workplace equalities.

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 200 words || 
Info
3. Wright, Thorin. and Berliner, Daniel. "Press During Wartime: Conflict and Press Freedom in Democracies and Autocracies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 07, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1062174_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How does involvement in conflict affect states’ respect for media freedom? We argue that conflict creates multiple dilemmas for leaders between imperatives for secrecy and openness. Leaders see secrecy as valuable both for operational success, and for preventing negative information about failures, mistakes, and abuses from reaching domestic and international audiences. However, leaders also see openness as valuable for costly signaling, bureaucratic oversight, and avoiding domestic and international sanctions. We argue that these dilemmas will be resolved in different ways by different types of regimes facing different types of conflict. Autocracies are more likely than democracies to respond to conflicts by restricting media freedoms. However, all regime types are likely to repress media when facing civil conflicts. The response of democracies in particular to international conflict varies depending on conflict intensity. At low levels of conflict intensity, imperatives for secrecy predominate, while at high levels, imperatives for openness predominate. We find support for these hypotheses using multiple indicators of press freedom and conflict in a global time-series cross-national sample. Our paper builds on prior work on repression, but extends the focus from physical integrity rights to media repression. Our paper also brings an international focus to research on media freedom.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 9176 words || 
Info
4. Aikat, Debashis. "An Imprisoned Champion of the Press: James Augustus Hicky’s Journey into Journalism as India's Press Pioneer in 1780" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113393_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An expatriate Irishman and a fiercely independent journalist, James Augustus Hicky published India’s first newspaper, the Bengal Gazette or the Calcutta General Advertiser in 1780. This paper narrates little-known facts about Hicky’s journalistic career, the influence of his newspaper on society and other issues not probed by earlier researchers.
Hicky quickly realized that truly distinguished newspapers should serve society, even at the risk of official displeasure. Hicky’s newspaper made interesting reading with its ample dose of scurrilous reporting, risqué advertisements reflecting the low morality in society, and scandalous accounts of the misdeeds of British administrators in India.
Soon enough, the British rulers charged him of libel. Hicky was harassed, attacked and jailed. Undaunted, Hicky continued to edit his newspaper from prison. But his publication did not survive long and the British rulers caused him immense harm and Hicky died a pauper.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 42 pages || Words: 15066 words || 
Info
5. D'Angelo, Paul. and Lombard, Matthew. "The Power of the Press: The Effects of Press Frames in Political Campaign News On Media Perceptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p91271_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper discusses how the behaviors, roles, and standards of mainstream journalism are framed in political campaign news and empirically examines applicability and accessibility effects of these frames on individuals’ thoughts and opinions of the news media. Following previous work on framing in campaign news, we posited that journalists frame the press in three ways, called conduit, strategy, and accountability. Participants in a between-subjects experiment were exposed to a campaign story about an exemplar ‘character issue’ from the 1992 primary elections containing these frames. Regarding applicability effects, each frame activated frame-related thoughts. In addition, subjects exposed to the strategy press frame interpreted the press as being significantly more negative than individuals exposed to the conduit or accountability frame; subjects exposed to the accountability press frame interpreted the press as having higher quality than individuals exposed to the conduit or strategy frame. Regarding accessibility effects, only the accountability press frame prompted individuals to access attitudes about news performance to form opinions about negativity and quality.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 247 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy