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2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 193 words || 
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1. Rocque, Michael. "Preventing the Criminal Man: Modern Approaches to Crime Prevention through a Biological Lens" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516369_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, criminologically-informed efforts to reduce or prevent crime were centered on addressing presumed biological causes of crime. However, most of these crime reduction strategies involved proposals to prevent segments of the population from reproducing—proposals that today would be considered ethically corrupt. Biologically-oriented criminology and crime control policies waned in the early to mid-20th century, but have recently re-emerged with new sophistication and attention to the importance of social context. Additionally, in recent years, criminological focus on “crime prevention” has grown. While much of the crime prevention literature is predicated on changing the environment to reduce opportunities to offend (see Clarke, 1980; Clarke and Felson, 2008), there is an emerging literature on what is known as developmental crime prevention. A large part of this literature is concerned with addressing biological/physiological risk factors early in life (see Trembley and Craig, 1995). This paper will review modern crime prevention, both theoretically and empirically, through a biological lens. The paper will demonstrate that biologically-based crime prevention (while not generally referred to as such) has re-entered the criminological literature and that these early interventions show promise to reduce crime and deviance.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 187 words || 
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2. Straley, Elizabeth. "Preventing Student Victimization: An Application of Clarke’s Situational Crime Prevention Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 19, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p674541_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Victimization at school has many negative consequences for students, such as lower educational attainment, impaired educational performance, and possible withdrawal from school (Bellmore, Witkow, Graham, & Juvonen, 2004; Juvonen, Nishina, & Graham, 2006; A. A. Peguero, 2011). Many schools have implemented costly safety measures such as metal detectors and paid security personnel. This research looked at the relationship between safety measures employed by schools in the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 and the prevalence of victimization in these schools. According to Clark’s Situational Crime Prevention framework (1997), the greater the number of formal deterrents for crime in schools should be related to lower levels of victimization for students. Common victimization trends were supported; females were less likely to be victimized than males, black students were less likely to be victimized than white students. However, this exploratory research used Situational Crime Prevention to provide a framework to try to understand student victimization patterns and deterrence, but found no statistically significant relationships between student characteristics, safety measures, and types of victimization. This would indicate that the measures implemented may not be addressing the motivations of students who victimize others.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 197 words || 
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3. Butchart, Robert., Mikton, Christopher. and Guedes, Alessandra. "World Health Organization and Violence Prevention Alliance: Global Plan of Action for Violence Prevention 2012-2020" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p577955_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: At a 2011 Global Campaign for Violence Prevention (GCVP) Meeting, experts identified three goals for global violence prevention over the next decade: (1) developing fair and efficient law enforcement and criminal justice systems; (2) addressing the social determinants of violence (e.g. poverty, economic inequality and unemployment, poor governance); and (3) the widespread implementation of evidence-based violence prevention strategies. The following six such strategies were selected: (i) parenting programmes; (ii) life- and social skills training programmes; (iii) changes in social norms supportive of violence; (iv) measures to reduce access to and harmful use of alcohol; (v) measures to reduce the risks of firearm-related deaths and injuries; and (vi) services to mitigate the consequences of violence and reduce its re-occurrence for victims and perpetrators. It was agreed that the GCVP role should be to focus on promoting implementation of the six evidence-based strategies. This presentation will examine the theoretical and empirical reasons for the selection of these goals, justify why the GCVP has chosen to focus on the third goal, and explain why they would substantially reduce national homicide rates in high-burden countries, help maintain low levels elsewhere (e.g. 1-2 per 100,000), and contribute to reducing non-fatal violence.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 210 words || 
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4. Wolfsthal, John. "Preventing Disaster - US and European Approaches to Preventing the Spread of Nuclear Weapons" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179399_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Preventing the use of nuclear weapons by terrorists and the spread of nuclear weapons to additional states remains on paper the top threat facing the United States and European states. The willingness of states to commit to the cause of non-proliferation and nuclear security, and to commit the resources necessary to succeed differ among different states in large part due to the divergent threat that states feel from nuclear dangers. The proximity of states to proliferation-prone regions, the likelihood of a state being the object of a nuclear threat, and the consequences of such an attack all affect the perceived dangers states see in the spread of nuclear capabilities.The case of Iran has demonstrated a basic level of shared threat perception within the trans-Atlantic community. However, it is not clear how far this shared perception goes, and to what extent domestic and regional factors may influence the use of tools that may be needed to prevent Iran's nuclear ambitions from succeeding. This paper will examine the case of Iran as a case study in how key states in Europe and the United States perceive the danger posed by state proliferation, and review the existing government postures toward nuclear terrorism, both in terms of their perceive threat and responses to date.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Words: 67 words || 
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5. Kalch, Anja. and Bilandzic, Helena. "Narrative insights into prevention behavior: The effect of experience-focussed narratives, outcomes frames and discrete emotions on preventive intentions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107164_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: This study investigates discrete emotional reactions (fear, regret, anger, contentment, relief and optimism) and social cognitive perceptions resulting from health prevention messages. The messages vary in action-outcome frames (gain and loss) and experientiality (degree of personal insights into motivations and goals of preventive behavior) for two health prevention messages (n = 349). Results show appraisal-congruent patterns for effects of emotions on social cognitive perceptions and behavioural intentions.

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