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2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 6805 words || 
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1. Brinegar, Adam. and DiGiusto, Gerald. "Is Some Better Than None? Previous Democratic Experience and the Democratic Peace" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p73738_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, we examine whether the war propensity of reversed democracies – those autocratic regimes with previous experience as democracies – differs from the behavior of other authoritarian states. If the normative explanations for the democratic peace are accurate, then the conflict-inhibiting principles inherent to democracy ought to survive, at least to a certain extent, the transition to authoritarianism. If this is indeed the case, these norms should continue to exert a pacifying effect in interactions between democracies and reversed democracies. As such, our argument constitutes a test of an important and heretofore overlooked observable implication of normative explanations of the democratic peace. After reviewing the institutional and normative theories of the democratic peace, we develop our theory concerning reversed democracies and devise testable hypotheses from it. Then, examining the expected probabilities for war in dyads with at least one democracy and using the rare-effects logistic regression technique, we test our theory. The results, particularly in the post-World War II era, are supportive of the claim that prior democratic experience and residual democratic norms continue to lessen the war propensity of reversed democracies. To explore our primary causal claims further, we conclude with two brief case studies of reversed democracies in Weimar Germany and Imperial Japan.

2007 - North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Pages: 6 pages || Words: 3416 words || 
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2. Sealey, Vicki. and Oehrtman, Michael. "Calculus Students' Assimilation of the Riemann Integral into a Previously Established Limit Structure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, Nevada, Oct 25, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p195822_index.html>
Publication Type: Research Report
Abstract: Two teaching experiments were conducted in calculus classes in a large public university. Prior to the experiments, an initial conceptual framework was developed based on a mathematical decomposition of the Riemann sum definition of the definite integral in four layers: product, summation, limit, and function. Several of the layers also include sublayers that illustrate various ways of thinking about each layer. Analysis of the data from the teaching experiments guided modification of the framework to also reflect the cognitive development of students. Data shows that students successfully assimilated the integral structure into a previously constructed limit structure, via approximations. Their struggles were concentrated in areas where the Riemann sum structure departed from the limit structures students had previously encountered.

2009 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 180 words || 
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3. Makse, Todd. and Sokhey, Anand. "Voter Turnout and Symbolic Participation in a Previously Divided Primary Electorate" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel Intercontinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 07, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p277554_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the wake of the divisive Democratic primary between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, many exit polls indicated that Clinton voters would either forego voting in the 2008 general election, or defect to the Republican nominee John McCain -- a potentially damaging trend for Obama's prospects of winning. In this paper, we look at support for Obama among different segments of the Democratic electorate, both in terms of voting and other participatory acts. Focusing on Ohio's Franklin County -- a county touted for its general representativeness of the American public (Hawkings and Nutting 2003) and featured in other prominent political science studies (Lacy 2001) -- we first examine individual-level turnout data and precinct-level results to ascertain whether these fears were realized. Next, to the extent that Clinton supporters were converted into Obama supporters, we examine the nature of this support. Utilizing an original geocoded dataset of participatory acts in Franklin County, we gauge the level of symbolic participation (e.g. yard signs, bumper stickers) in Obama and Clinton primary strong-holds, tracing both dynamic and spatial patterns in these participatory acts.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 1549 words || 
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4. Kononova, Anastasia., Alhabash, Saleem. and Cropp, Fritz. "Effects of International Stories, Previous Knowledge, and Credibility on Images of Foreign Nations: An Image Theory Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 22, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p404344_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The effects of stereotypical depiction of national out-groups in online international news stories are studied from the image theory perspective. In particular, the paper aims at exploring how depictions of nations as allies, enemies, barbarians, and dependents influence individuals’ impressions of these nations and the tendencies to support different foreign policies targeting these nations. Taking in consideration that previous knowledge and experiences as well as news story credibility might affect evaluations of nations, we propose a model where previous knowledge moderates the effects of stereotyping, and perceived story credibility mediates the relationships between news story depictions and attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. A 4 (Image) x 2 (Stereotyping) mixed experimental design is proposed to study the effects of international news stories. The results of a pretest study are reported. The data are currently being collected for the primary experiment.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 176 words || 
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5. Tillyer, Rob., Ward, Jeffrey. and Hartley, Richard. "Gender and Criminal Court Outcomes: Does Previous Criminal History Matter?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p666934_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous studies consistently demonstrate that gender is an influential factor in sentencing outcomes. Explanations for the gender effect include the chivalry hypothesis that suggests females are likely to receive more lenient treatment and the evil women perspective, which argues females are likely to receive more severe outcomes. We investigate these competing hypotheses by considering whether gender uniformly influences sentence length or if its effect varies dependent on the defendant’s criminal history. Using federal sentencing data, our study offers a more precise measure of criminal history to assess if gender and criminal history interact in a manner that offers support for one or both of these hypotheses. Given the theoretical foundation of the study, results are anticipated to offer specific commentary on the accuracy of these explanations. Moreover, if an interactive relationship between gender and criminal history is discovered, methodological implications for understanding the influence of criminal history on court outcomes are relevant. Finally, evidence of a tipping point for gender would also have practical policy implications for future sentencing decisions.

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