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2012 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1561 words || 
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1. Evans, Andrea. "Principals’ interpretation of organizational context: Understanding principal self-efficacy and the nature of principal practice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, City Center Marriott, Denver, CO, Nov 15, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p586259_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explored principals’ interpretations of their organizational context and how those interpretations affected principal self-efficacy and the nature of principal practice. Interviews focused on principals’ interpretation of their school organizational context, self-efficacy, and leadership performance. This study found that while principals generally felt they had the knowledge and skills to perform effectively, they interpreted that the organizational context either provided opportunities or barriers for them, which shaped their leadership performance.

2017 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Dickey, Allison. and Billman, Linda. "Special Education and Principal Licensure: Are Principals Prepared for 21st Century Schooling?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Orlando Caribe Royale, Orlando, Florida, Feb 10, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1168998_index.html>
Publication Type: Multiple Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation will explore coursework associated with principal licensure in Ohio. The researchers are focused on what kind and how much special education training is specified coursework leading to licensure.

2016 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Szeto, Elson. and Cheng, Annie Yan-Ni. "Preparing principals: What is still missing in perceived principal leadership in diverse school contexts?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Detroit Marriott Renaissance Center, Detroit, Michigan, Nov 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1160752_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Schools change into complex and diverse contexts. Newly-appointed principals (NAPs) face leadership challenges in such contexts after completing a licensure programme. This proposal addresses the gap between the NAPs’ perceptions of leadership role in schools and social justice leadership as revealed in the literature. The findings are that enacting social justice leadership role is missing in the NAPs’ perception to address socially-unjust issues of equal and equitable learning for all students in diverse school contexts.

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 293 words || 
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4. Song, Miyeon. and Turner, Ian. "Who is the Principal’s Principal? Oversight, Management, and Performance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1257540_index.html>
Publication Type: iPoster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The literature on political control of bureaucracy argues that government performance increases when the elected principals control the bureaucracy by external oversight. However, the public management literature suggests that government can promote performance by allowing more discretion to the bureaucracy, and not more control. Despite these conflicting arguments, little systematic research has investigated the relationship between oversight, management, and public service performance.
We examine the effects of both external oversight and managerial discretion on performance, in particular by focusing on two dimensions of performance: excellence vs. equity. We measure external oversight by incorporating both top-down oversight, that by the central government, and bottom-up oversight, that by parents and students over the schools. Managerial discretion is captured by school principal’s discretion in managing schools. We expect that oversight and discretion have a different effect on performance due to differing preferences of external overseers (principals) and school managers (agents). Oversight over schools can increase excellence because external stakeholders are interested in quantifiable performance indicators such as test scores. However, school principals’ discretion may contribute to educational equity because they tend to care about low-performing students.
We test our expectations by using Seoul Education Longitudinal Study (SELS) data, collected by the Seoul city government in South Korea, which includes 16,000 students from 300 schools between 2010 and 2015. Seoul City schools provide a unique opportunity to test our hypotheses because the education system is centralized and heavily regulated. Our pooled regression analysis finds that top-down oversight promotes educational excellence but fails to influence equity. Meanwhile, managerial discretion increases educational equity but does not affect excellence. By incorporating both excellence and equity into educational performance, this study contributes toward a better understanding of current conflicting findings regarding the effects of external oversight and managerial discretion on performance.

2017 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Donaldson, Emily. "Leading complex change for principal quality: The “how” of improving district systems of principal support" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, Colorado, Nov 16, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1289938_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper presents findings from a qualitative case study of a district leadership team aiming to change the way they provided ongoing professional learning for principals. Using concepts from organizational sensemaking and organizational learning theories, this study highlights how organizational routines and “sensegiving” leadership interact to enable ongoing refinement of work. Findings suggest that routines of continual, collective revision of work and deliberate, hands-off guidance from high-level district leadership are key to shifting district practice.

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