Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 842 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 169 - Next  Jump:
2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 124 words || 
Info
1. Peraita, Carmen. "Printing Part 2 of Don Quixote: The Book Trade and Print Production in Madrid, ca. 1615" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p753584_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper approaches the second part of Don Quijote de la Mancha from the perspective of the material history of the book. After reviewing the chronology and process of printing DQ II and surveying the production of Juan de la Cuesta’s workshop in 1615, I will take a broader look at publishing and the book market in Madrid around that time: the various printers active there and the types of books they published, the typology of contracts and aprobaciones for printing a text, the networks of book patronage, and the practices of book circulation and distribution. An understanding of these contexts will shed light on the bibliographical characteristics of DQ II (e.g., format, layout, and typography) and how they conditioned the book’s earliest reception.

2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 135 words || 
Info
2. Leitch, Stephanie. "Citings in Print: Copying as Practice in Early Modern Prints" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p751183_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The extent to which motifs from early modern prints resurfaced in sources far from their original contexts begs the question of what exactly they were up to. The kind of copying that we witness in the first generation of early printed images, as in the Nuremberg Chronicle for example, exemplifies recycling before copies were invested with a high degree of epistemic authority. Later generations of prints gave rise to a process of citation in which certain motifs circulated as touchstones that credited knowledge-making claims. In this manner, copies of Dürer’s rhinoceros charged into other contexts that traded on testaments to eyewitness observation, namely travel accounts and physiognomies. This paper parses the rhetorical and visual practices of media in which the copy would direct a concerted effort to establish an antecedent as a credible source.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 187 words || 
Info
3. Berger, Susanna. "Thesis Prints and the Pedagogical Print Culture of Early Modern Paris" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, Mar 23, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481343_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the early modern period scholars devised an innovative category of broadsides that combined text and imagery for pedagogical purposes. These broadsides, developed first among the colleges and convent schools associated with the University of Paris and exported from there to connect a number of institutions internationally, represent a novel form of thesis print, the genre of broadsides designed by instructors or students for the purpose of public oral examinations called "disputations." Although in many such thesis prints the text is positioned on the bottom half with the visual imagery printed separately above it, in a compelling subset created by Franciscan and Carmelite professors, text and imagery are thoroughly integrated. This paper explains the history and function of illustrated thesis prints, and considers the genre's relations with other forms of didactic imagery, including printed impresas and hand drawings found in notebooks of philosophy students of the period. The paper addresses the ways in which thesis prints were displayed and stored, and presents evidence of the appropriation and adaptation of existing thesis prints by scholars throughout Europe, to reveal how these broadsides created international audiences for didactic art.

2012 - 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 189 words || 
Info
4. de haas, Roel. and de Jongh, Maggie. "The role of the printing industry in reducing print poverty in poor countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p551509_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The international community has obtained great achievements in their effort to enhance access to Education for All. This is demonstrated by the 19 million more children attending school since 2003. The current challenge now lies in how to provide Quality Education for All keeping in mind the lack of resources and an exponential growth in educational demand.
Access to books and learning materials (BLM’s) depends on the existence of a sustainable book industry in the country. It is therefore vital to harmonize the government, private (including all stakeholders in the book chain: eg. Writers, illustrators, editors, printers, distributors, bookshops, libraries, teachers, students, parents) and donor activities in their effort to enhance access to affordable, quality books for all.
Currently most developing states print their BLM’s abroad. This increases the price of books due to transport costs but especially margins of the middle man. This increase in price translates in decreased accessibility given the strained resources of the state. The project Books for the other 90 per cent is actively combating the problem of print poverty in collaboration with the government, donors, and all stakeholders in the book chain.

2017 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 151 words || 
Info
5. Cheng, Tiffany. "Printing "Opiate" for the Masses: A Marxist Approach to 3D Printing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston MA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1274044_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Karl Marx famously stated, "Die Religion...ist das Opium des Volkes," or "religion...is the opiate of the masses." The abolition of religion--specifically the elimination of this illusory happiness of humanity--would be a call for people's true happiness. Given the rise of digital design and tools such as 3D printers, more and more people believe that they are now empowered as agents of creation and manufacturers of change. They have access to new means of production: a novel way of "making" through "printing" at their leisure. But how promising is this new techno-ability in creating a utopian future for humanity? I undertake content analysis of Internet message boards, 3D printing advertisements/videos, and web pages and argue that the widespread rhetoric surrounding 3D printer's incredible fabrication ability is a misleading promise for a utopian future. To have a chance at actualizing true happiness, humanity needs to relinquish her illusion that salvation can be "printed."

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 169 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy