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2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 98 words || 
Info
1. Oliver, William., Dieterich, William. and Brennan, Tim. "Predicting Recidivism with Prior Convictions Instead of Prior Arrests" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p577729_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scales that measure risk of recidivism usually include number of prior arrests, sometimes broken down by offense category, as a predictor. Number of prior convictions, however, is considered by many to be a fairer measure of criminal history. This is especially true at the presentence investigation stage. We discuss the possible effects of using prior convictions instead of prior arrests to predict recidivism and describe a general approach for measuring these effects. We applied our approach to recidivism risk scales in the COMPAS instrument and found that substituting prior convictions for prior arrests resulted in very similar performance.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 129 words || 
Info
2. Bejerano, Arleen. "The Effects of Prior Knowledge on Learning and How to Access and Use Prior Knowledge to Improve Learning in The Training Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p418957_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A vast amount of literature shows the connection between prior knowledge and learning. These studies indicate that individuals learn new things by starting with what they already know and building from that knowledge. However, in the training classroom, teachers’ communicative behaviors indicate that soliciting students’ prior knowledge and including this information into a course rarely occurs. Few researchers have investigated the effects of prior knowledge on learning and how to incorporate this knowledge into the structure of a training program. In this panel, this presenter will discuss the available literature on prior knowledge, locate strategies that trainers and curriculum developers can employ to elicit and use prior knowledge in training classrooms, and provide trainers and curriculum developers with communicative strategies they can use to improve trainee learning.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 5 pages || Words: 2042 words || 
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3. Shin, Mija. and Chung, Yongkuk. "Prior Attitudes in Processing TV PSAs: Effects of Accessibility and Congruency on Attention, Memory and Attitude Changes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113155_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines how prior attitudes toward the issues such as smoking, drinking and drug use affect the processing of TV PSAs designed to decrease those riskly behaviors. TV viewers may have strong or weak prior attitudes toward the issues when viewing these PSAs and the automatically activated these attitudes likely affect attention, memory and persuasion. Further, whether a viewer has an attitude that is congruent or incongruent with the attitude presented through the PSAs would also influence these factors. It is predicted that the PSAs viewed with strong (thus highly accessible) prior attitudes will receive more attention and will be remembered better than the PSAs viewed with weak attitudes (inaccessible). Further, when the prior attitudes match with the message attitude, the processing will be more elaborated (more attention and better memory). However, attitude change will be induced when the attitudes are weak rather than strong.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 7820 words || 
Info
4. Fonner, Kathryn . and Roloff, Michael. "Exposure to Downsizing and Prospective Employees' Job Expectations Prior to Organizational Entry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p13303_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examined how emotional support and information about negative workplace trends from parents and friends influence prospective employees’ job expectations as they prepare to enter their first full time professional employment relationship. A survey of junior and senior undergraduates indicated that prospective employees value employed friends as their primary source of workplace information, but that communication with parents was more strongly related to their initial psychological contract. Emotional support from parents and friends was positively correlated with the prospective employees’ optimism toward the workplace, but discussing job insecurity, layoffs, and the poor state of the economy with friends was negatively associated with optimism. Prospective employees’ expectations for job security increased with emotional support from and positive feelings derived from interactions with parents, but not friends. Expectations for organizational support were positively associated with emotional support from and positive feelings stemming from interactions with both parents and friends. Expectations for organizational support, job security, and organizational trust were not significantly related to discussion of negative workplace trends with parents or friends. Positive feelings about the workplace based on interactions with parents and friends predicted organizational trust, but the nature of the psychological contract was the primary predictor of trust. Surprisingly, results demonstrated that prospective employees’ initial psychological contracts and organizational trust are relatively resilient against their awareness of downsizing and job insecurity, and that emotional support and positive feelings are vital to creating optimistic expectations for the workplace.

2005 - International Studies Association Words: 48 words || 
Info
5. Zegart, Amy. "What Did We Know, and When Did We Know it?: Lessons from the Intelligence Failures Prior to 9-11" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p69778_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will summarize findings from an ongoing book project, designed to identify, evaluate and learn from the US intelligence failures prior to the September 11 terrorist attacks. This project builds upon the author's book entitled FLAWED BY DESIGN: THE EVOLUTION OF THE CIA, JCS AND NSC.

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