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2013 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 1909 words || 
Info
1. Ramirez, Laurie. "“I am White – that’s a privilege.”: White Teachers, White Privilege, and Social Justice Education" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia, Feb 15, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p602860_index.html>
Publication Type: Multiple Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A study of white preservice teachers' engagement with conceptions of Whiteness and White privilege as a lens through which to foster advocacy for socially just educational practices.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1013 words || 
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2. Brenneman, Luke. "GIFTS: Using Your Privilege to Teach About Privilege" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p985788_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: GIFTS Individual Submission

2008 - The Law and Society Association Pages: 56 pages || Words: 35590 words || 
Info
3. Smith, Deirdre. "An Uncertain Privilege: Implied Waiver and the Evisceration of the Psychotherapist-Patient Privilege in Federal Courts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 29, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p235249_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the 1996 decision, Jaffee v. Raymond, the United States Supreme Court recognized a federal common law psychotherapist-patient privilege, resolving a sharp split in the federal appeals courts. However, in the years since the decision, the state of the privilege remains far from certain. Most significantly, courts’ application of the principle of the “at issue” waiver – meaning that a person is deemed to have waived some or all of the protection of the privilege by placing her mental condition in issue in litigation – has led to inconsistent and unprincipled results, creating a body of case law in disarray.

A court’s conceptualization of waiver of the psychotherapist-patient privilege can have an enormous impact on the course of litigation. The issue of waiver has the potential to arise in any case in which a plaintiff seeks emotional distress damages, as well as in cases alleging discrimination on the basis of mental illness. Since federal courts are a primary forum for the vindication of civil rights, the courts’ approach to the psychotherapist-patient privilege can have a significant impact, and perhaps a chilling effect, on the choices made by those who may seek relief under federal civil rights laws. This paper proposes a more reasoned and coherent approach to the issue of waiver of the psychotherapist-patient privilege; one which is not only consistent with the formulation of the privilege established in Jaffee but also ensures that the concept of waiver does not vitiate the privilege entirely.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 68 words || 
Info
4. Jones Jr., Richard G.. "'All of the sudden, I had male privilege!' Using Narrative to Unpack the Intersections of Privilege, Transition, and Passing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p423870_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The personal narratives collected from transgendered men are examined in order to explore the politics inherent in navigating the intersection of gender identities. Two white-identifying men discuss their experiences negotiating, resisting, and reinscribing the “new found” male privilege they were ascribed as they began to “pass” as male while “transitioning” from female to male. Analysis and conclusions focus on the incongruency between participants’ (now intelligible) performance of maleness.

2013 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 212 words || 
Info
5. Eisen, Daniel., Basch, Charlotte., Prechtel, Catherine. and Sanderlin, Ben. "White Privilege on Campus: Feelings of Exclusivity, Discourses of Privilege, and Constructing Racial Boundaries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Nugget Casino, Reno/Sparks, Nevada, Mar 21, 2013 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p633822_index.html>
Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although processes of racialization create categories that individuals employ to understand the social worlds they encounter, White individuals are often unaware of the privileges that they are granted by their race. White privilege allows individuals to believe that race is no longer an important factor in determining life chances, a belief that is supported by and intersects with discourses of colorblindness and what it means to be liberal. This study employs a grounded theory methodology to analyze focus group discussions to examine how white privilege leads White individuals at a small liberal arts university, where more than 20% of the student body is from Hawaii, to feel excluded from social spaces that are predominately occupied by non-white individuals from Hawaii. Although social spaces occupied by White individuals are not labeled, social spaces occupied by non-white individuals from Hawaii become labeled (e.g., the Hawaii table), raising awareness about the existence of these social spaces. This encourages White individuals to create discourses about the exclusivity of these social spaces and the privileges that an otherwise structurally marginalized group receives . Ultimately, this research examines how white privilege, the naming of non-white social spaces, and the development of discourses of privilege creates and maintains social boundaries on a college campus.

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