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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 489 words || 
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1. Goldberg, Jessica., Bumgarner, Erin., jacobs, francine., Contreras, Mariah., Fosse, Nathan., Raskin, Maryna., Easterbrooks, Ann. and Mistry, Jayanthi. "Measuring Program Fidelity in the [Program Name] Home Visiting Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2018-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962730_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010), states have received over $1.5 billion for evidence-based home visiting programs, yet questions remain about how faithfully such programs are being implemented. This question is crucial for contextualizing program effects that vary considerably depending on how faithfully programs operate according to model standards (Durlak & DuPre, 2008). The proposed study informs this discussion by describing two indices of fidelity created for a statewide home visiting model evaluation. Guided by Carroll and colleagues (2007), who identified five aspects of fidelity measurement (i.e., adherence to the model, dosage, quality of service delivery, participant engagement/responsiveness, and identification of successful program elements) – we configured two indices of model fidelity: (1) program-level fidelity scores, reflecting the degree to which programs operated as intended by the model, and (2) individual-level fidelity scores, reflecting the degree to which individual evaluation participants used services as the model intends. We then explored associations between indices of fidelity and (a) maternal characteristics, and (b) other indices of program operations (e.g., duration). Finally, using a multi-level modeling (MLM) framework, we explored whether mother and child outcomes varied as a function of fidelity.
Fidelity scores were calculated using data from the program’s MIS, in which home visitors recorded all program-related activities. Data covered four fiscal years. Eleven indicators of fidelity were selected from the program’s “critical program elements” (see Table 1); both individual- and program-level fidelity scores ranged from 0 to 1, where 0 = total lack of fidelity to the program model and 1 = total adherence to the model. Program-level fidelity scores were calculated for all programs sites statewide (n = 26), averaged across fiscal years, and then assigned to each evaluation participant based on the program in which she spent the most time. Individual-level fidelity scores were calculated as a proportion of the indicators met by each evaluation participant (n = 433).
There was greater variability in individual-level fidelity scores compared to program-level fidelity (see Figure 1). Average program-level fidelity scores were quite high (M = 0.74, range 0.71- 0.80). In contrast, individual-level fidelity scores were widely distributed (M = 0.54, SD = 0.24). Program-level fidelity was not related to most indicators of mothers’ utilization, in contrast to individual-level fidelity And while program-level fidelity was not related to most maternal characteristics, Individual-level fidelity was related to several (e.g., depression, employment, living arrangements). MLM analyses indicated that outcomes varied depending on program-level fidelity; for example, mothers in higher fidelity programs had a lower probability of cigarette smoking and drug use, and had children who scored higher on child responsiveness. Unlike the case of program-level fidelity, associations between individual-level fidelity and outcomes were not always in the expected direction. For example, mothers with higher individual-level fidelity scores were less likely to have a repeat birth within two years, but more likely to report intimate partner violence. These results suggest additional program strategies for participant outreach and engagement.

2017 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 198 words || 
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2. Kasperowski, Dick. and Hillman, Thomas. "The Culture of Contribution in Citizen Science: Programs and Anti-programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston MA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1272493_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Citizen science projects are often designed to minimize learning as a necessity for mass mobilization, however such processes are outside the control of owners of projects. Projects aiming for scientific output (peer-reviewed publications) must have an instance in the scientific process were citizens are constructed as on par with scientists to assure data quality. These instances are often situated in the participatory protocols (programs) harnessing some kind of ability of the crowd, which make their participation and contributions valid for scientific work. At the same time, citizen science projects also uphold boundaries between citizens and scientists. Intuitively, this might not be necessary as scientists by their professional training have abilities beyond what is possible for volunteer contributors. In practice such boundaries are not so clear. The aim of this paper is to explore when and how such boundaries are challenged as learning is occurring on behalf of contributors in citizen science projects. The purpose is to illuminate the relationship between the citizen scientists as constructed as contributor to science with specific, but static qualities (programs), and the development of contributors over time (anti-programs). Data consists of interactions between researchers and contributors on discussion forums of citizen science projects.

2007 - American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education Pages: 4 pages || Words: 1568 words || 
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3. White, Stephen. and Fox, Rebecca. "Strengthening Program Decisions Through Qualitative Data: Measuring Teacher Development Using Program Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Hilton New York, New York, NY, Feb 24, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p142724_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper reports findings from one program-level research study conducted in an advanced master’s degree program. The paper addresses how systematic data collection can be used to measure program effectiveness.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 10667 words || 
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4. Plein, L.. "The Complexities of Managed Care Program Preference and Implementation: Resiliency in PCCM Programs in State Medicaid Systems" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2018-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p62112_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: During the 1990s, the Medicaid program and its administrative practices became the target of reform at the state and federal level. Throughout the decade, pressures mounted for state Medicaid systems to adopt and emulate managed care practices like those found in the private insurance market that relied on health maintenance organizations (HMOs) to hold down health care costs. Although many states already had in place managed care systems relying on primary care case management (PCCM) to control utilization and expenditures, new political preferences favored the adoption of HMO programs in the name of more aggressive means of holding down Medicaid costs. This paper reviews the PCCM experience among states that have been the subject of an ongoing research focus concerning American federalism and Medicaid managed care. This project has been coordinated by the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government. The ten states in the study are Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio and West Virginia. The discussion focuses on how a number of states moved to embrace the HMO model at the expense of the PCCM approach, how a few states held fast to the PCCM model, how implementation forced some reconsideration of the appropriateness of a single-model approach, and how efforts are underway to develop complementary managed care systems that incorporate HMO, PCCM, as well as other approaches. Political interest in the HMO approach served to disrupt existing Medicaid managed arrangements in many states during the 1990s with varying consequences. Now that Medicaid managed care is largely out of the limelight, more deliberative, pragmatic, and inclusive approaches to developing appropriate managed care arrangements are underway.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 8258 words || 
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5. Choi, Yun Jung. "How Pacing in Children’s Programming Changes According to Program Goals, Target Audience, and Format" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172071_index.html>
Publication Type: Interactive Paper (Poster)
Abstract: Pacing in children’s programs is compared in three contexts; program purpose (education-oriented vs. entertainment-oriented); target audience (programs targeted at pre-school children vs. school-aged children); and program formats (live action vs. animation). Pacing is measured based on 4 essential criteria suggested by previous literature, the number of cut changes, camera movements, active motion, and auditory features. Content analyses of current children’s programs show that education-oriented programs are slower paced than entertainment-oriented programs while live action programs are slower paced than animations. No pacing difference between programs targeted at preschool children and school-aged children is observed. However one 2-way and one 3-way interaction are observed. These interactions indicate that entertainment-oriented animation programs targeted at school-aged children are the fastest paced programs.

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