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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 489 words || 
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1. Goldberg, Jessica., Bumgarner, Erin., jacobs, francine., Contreras, Mariah., Fosse, Nathan., Raskin, Maryna., Easterbrooks, Ann. and Mistry, Jayanthi. "Measuring Program Fidelity in the [Program Name] Home Visiting Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962730_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010), states have received over $1.5 billion for evidence-based home visiting programs, yet questions remain about how faithfully such programs are being implemented. This question is crucial for contextualizing program effects that vary considerably depending on how faithfully programs operate according to model standards (Durlak & DuPre, 2008). The proposed study informs this discussion by describing two indices of fidelity created for a statewide home visiting model evaluation. Guided by Carroll and colleagues (2007), who identified five aspects of fidelity measurement (i.e., adherence to the model, dosage, quality of service delivery, participant engagement/responsiveness, and identification of successful program elements) – we configured two indices of model fidelity: (1) program-level fidelity scores, reflecting the degree to which programs operated as intended by the model, and (2) individual-level fidelity scores, reflecting the degree to which individual evaluation participants used services as the model intends. We then explored associations between indices of fidelity and (a) maternal characteristics, and (b) other indices of program operations (e.g., duration). Finally, using a multi-level modeling (MLM) framework, we explored whether mother and child outcomes varied as a function of fidelity.
Fidelity scores were calculated using data from the program’s MIS, in which home visitors recorded all program-related activities. Data covered four fiscal years. Eleven indicators of fidelity were selected from the program’s “critical program elements” (see Table 1); both individual- and program-level fidelity scores ranged from 0 to 1, where 0 = total lack of fidelity to the program model and 1 = total adherence to the model. Program-level fidelity scores were calculated for all programs sites statewide (n = 26), averaged across fiscal years, and then assigned to each evaluation participant based on the program in which she spent the most time. Individual-level fidelity scores were calculated as a proportion of the indicators met by each evaluation participant (n = 433).
There was greater variability in individual-level fidelity scores compared to program-level fidelity (see Figure 1). Average program-level fidelity scores were quite high (M = 0.74, range 0.71- 0.80). In contrast, individual-level fidelity scores were widely distributed (M = 0.54, SD = 0.24). Program-level fidelity was not related to most indicators of mothers’ utilization, in contrast to individual-level fidelity And while program-level fidelity was not related to most maternal characteristics, Individual-level fidelity was related to several (e.g., depression, employment, living arrangements). MLM analyses indicated that outcomes varied depending on program-level fidelity; for example, mothers in higher fidelity programs had a lower probability of cigarette smoking and drug use, and had children who scored higher on child responsiveness. Unlike the case of program-level fidelity, associations between individual-level fidelity and outcomes were not always in the expected direction. For example, mothers with higher individual-level fidelity scores were less likely to have a repeat birth within two years, but more likely to report intimate partner violence. These results suggest additional program strategies for participant outreach and engagement.

2010 - 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 139 words || 
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2. Leavitt, Tom. "Assessing what works in life skills education programs: lessons from the Passport to Success program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400887_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Passport to Success life skills education program has been implemented in diverse settings in a number of countries. Each country’s program has been closely monitored and evaluated as it has evolved from a pilot program to a larger, more mature program. Evaluation has involved both quantitative assessment of youth outcomes and qualitative assessment of program impacts and management processes. The presentation discusses the results of these assessments, focusing on the lessons learned about the characteristics of effective and impactful programming. The importance of a wide range of program characteristics will be discussed, including the intensity of the program (number of lessons), the amount of contact time between youth and the program, fidelity to the curriculum, type of participating youth (in-school, in employment training program, other), type of participation (mandatory or voluntary), and management structure.

2011 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 4722 words || 
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3. Bauer, Scott. and Robey, Philip. "Reform of School Leadership Preparation Programs: How responsive have programs been?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Westin Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, Nov 16, 2011 Online </>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p523366_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine both the extent and the nature of reform of university-based leadership preparation programs since the implementation of the ELCC Standards in 2002. A survey of programs in NCATE accredited institutions was conducted, yielding 181 usable responses (52% response rate). Results show design features of programs in 2002-3 and 2010-11, and that the extent of reform has been considerable.

2011 - AECT International Convention Words: 74 words || 
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4. Wang, Charles Xiaoxue., Hibbard, Susan., Kenny, Robert. and Chirinos, Daniel. "Integrating Second Life into an EFL Program: An Program Evaluation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AECT International Convention, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, FL, Nov 08, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p511933_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation reports an evaluation of collaborative research and curriculum development project that used Second Life as a medium for EFL learning and instruction. The evaluation was to find best ways to integrate Second Life into EFL programs in Chinese universities. The presentation shares findings and discusses implications for designing and implementing similar programs using Second Life as a learning medium for linking students across continents and bringing different cultures into virtual learning environments.

2014 - 38th Annual NCBS National Conference Words: 52 words || 
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5. Bakari, Adonijah. "Title: Rites of Passage Programs: The Role of African American Studies Programs and Departments in the 21st-Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 38th Annual NCBS National Conference, Miami Marriott Dadeland Hotel, Miami, Florida, Mar 05, 2014 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p732158_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation explores two concepts: first, the historical role played by rites of passage programs as a manhood developmental tool in Africa; and second, it explores how rites of passage/manhood development programs can be implemented as a vital part of the mission of African American Studies programs in the 21st century.

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