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2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 238 words || 
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1. Del Villar, Erika Mae. "PROJECT TERROR: State Projects, U.S. Policy and the Construction of the War on Terror" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1010179_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The absence of a universal definition of terrorism has resulted in varied – and even conflicting – interpretations of the phenomenon within national legal systems. Defining terrorism and operationalizing the mechanisms to combat it can thus be perceived as a ‘state project’ (Jessop 1990) rather than a global one; it is a tool necessary for state formation, cohesion, and hegemony. Since each State has the liberty to define terrorism and formulate laws or policies in line with it, the processes by which a state conceptualizes and operationalizes terrorism reflects particular political (rather than human rights) interests, and ultimately becomes another instrument of state power. In the case of the United States, the adoption of post-9/11 counterterrorism policies reflected the development of a highly politicized discourse on the ‘War on Terror,’ and was the product of the need to prove American resilience and national might in the face of an “unknown enemy.”
Drawing on the theoretical lens of Bob Jessop’s (1990) strategic-relational approach to examining states, this paper examines the strategic political processes engaged in by the United States to define and frame terrorism through formal laws and government policies over time. The aim is to understand how these processes relate to the development of a discourse and regime around terrorism (and counter-terrorism) that not merely seeks to address the threat, but more significantly, becomes another mechanism to consistently ensure and reify the global hegemonic power of the United States.

2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 300 words || 
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2. Timm, Susanne. "The gap of liberation: One project, two Ideas, an educational project bridging Namibia and East Germany" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p487881_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Following South-African air raids against refugee camps for Namibians in Angola, the German Democratic Republic accepted, from 1979 to 1990, some hundred young Namibian children for an educational project, located in the GDR. There the children lived in a special orphan house where they received care and schooling. In 1990 all children (most of them now young adults) returned to the newly independent Namibia.
The project to educate Namibian children in the GDR as result of a two-party-collaboration could have been an example for an exceptional intercultural educational undertaking during the cold war. As such, it would have stood out as an example for solidarity in humanitarian tasks, but also as a project supporting a liberation movement by education. In reality, however, the entire educational process, its planning as well as its practice remained on side of the GDR. The East German actors adapted only minimally the standard school program, thereby imposing conflicting patterns and inconsistent ideals on the project: On one side, there was the Namibian liberation movement. In their context, liberation meant above all the liberation from South Africa’s racist oppression and the vision to create a new and independent nation, fathoming out the possibilities of justice, equity, humanity and a self-determined life. On the other side, there were the East Germans educators, who acted like a consolidated institution, constructed according to the Soviet type of socialism that permeated all societal subsystems and penetrated especially the education system in all its aspects. As a result, this project of educating Namibian children in the GDR for a better and liberated future materialized as a quasi-colonial educational mission.
The talk is based on research in German archives and on published resources. As historical work the research project likewise emphasizes the perspective of comparison, focusing different cultures and conceptions of education.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 1 words || 
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3. Pren, Karen. "22. Mexican Migration Project and Latin American Migration Project" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p524107_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 598 words || 
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4. Janigan, Kara. "Determining a project’s “success”: Reflections on the Girls’ Education Project in rural Tajikistan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p635870_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore notions of “success” related to the Girls’ Education Project implemented in rural Tajikistan. Since Tajikistan’s independence in 1991 the number of rural girls leaving school after grade 9 has been increasing at an alarming rate. In order to improve rural girls’ secondary school attendance and retention, in 2006 Save the Children, local non-governmental organization (NGO) partners, and the Ministry of Education implemented a two-year UNICEF-funded Girls’ Education Project (GEP). Through my doctoral mixed-method study, I compared rural girls’ secondary school experiences and opportunities at six schools (three GEP schools and three non-GEP schools) in two districts located in regions with the lowest levels of female secondary school participation nationwide.
Two research questions guided my doctoral study: 1) What factors serve as obstacles or enablers to girls’ secondary school experiences and opportunities in rural Tajikistan? and 2) How did the GEP attempt to overcome factors limiting rural girls’ secondary school experiences and opportunities and which aspects of the project were perceived to be most effective?
The study’s theoretical framework contains concepts from two sets of theories: 1) social reproduction (schooling as a means of maintaining and reproducing the status quo) and 2) empowerment (schooling as a means of changing the status quo). Data collected reveals two groups’ perspectives: 1) adult participants (Ministry of Education officials, NGO staff, school administrators and teachers) and 2) rural female upper secondary school students. A multi-level data analysis process was used to compare findings within and across districts.
Factors that serve as either an obstacle or an enabler of girls’ educational experiences and opportunities include those relating to the community/society, family, school, and self. Factors related to community/society include the dominant belief that a girl is “grown-up” by 15 and should no longer go to school which intersects with family poverty to create a major barrier to girls’ non-compulsory secondary schooling. Factors affecting girls’ schooling related to the family were the most significant determinant of a girl’s schooling. Of all the GEP activities, participants consistently considered the girls’ overnight camp to be the “best” activity. Findings show how enabling just a few girls to return to school significantly increases the likelihood of other girls being allowed to attend school in these rural communities.
Throughout the research process I considered notions of this project’s “success”. Despite the short duration of the GEP (two years), and the fact that I conducted the research a little more than one year after the project had ended, there is evidence that the project activities did enable girls to return to school who would otherwise not have had this opportunity and it enhanced their experiences while in school. From a statistical perspective the number of girls who returned to school was not numerically significant (for example, where they previously were only one or two girls in grades 10 or 11 maybe there were 8 or 10 during the GEP). However, from a humanistic perspective and considering the experiences of each girl to be of importance, these results are significant. Most importantly, female students who participated in various GEP activities described many experiences that they otherwise would never have.
This study is significant to the field of Comparative and International Education because it aims to address two persistent research gaps within the field of girls’ and women’s education in low-income countries: to gain a deeper understanding of the factors affecting rural girls’ schooling in Tajikistan, as well as gain a deeper understanding of an NGO intervention, the GEP, implemented to address factors limiting and/or hindering in order to improve girls’ educational experiences, opportunities and achievement.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9554 words || 
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5. Krumova, Elena. "The End of the “Society of Organizations” and Organizational Form: Projects and Projectivity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p565987_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper argues that just like rational bureaucracy was the organizational form of modernity, temporary organizations defined as short-term endeavors for the accomplishment of specific tasks through interdependent teams is a new generalized form of organizing that can be found in a variety of sectors and fields. The paper argues that more attention should be directed towards theorizing and analyzing short-term forms of organizing in the private and public sectors.

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