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2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 223 words || 
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1. Pren, Karen. "24. Office of Population Research / Princeton University, Mexican Migration Project & Latin American Migration Project" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435995_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: Founded in 1982, the Mexican Migration Project (MMP) has annually administered ethnosurveys to randomly sampled households in various communities in Mexico since 1987. In 1998, the Latin American Migration Project (LAMP) was born. For both projects, each community yields approximately 200 surveyed households in the home country, as well as 10 to 20 households of community members living in the U.S. Responses are converted to electronic format and compiled to form five unique data sets. PERS file contains socioeconomic information for each household member, including basic measures of domestic and international migration. MIG file contains detailed border-crossing, measures of migratory experience of family of origin, extended family and friends, and the social and economic characteristics of the last U.S. trip for each household head. HOUSE file contains measures of household composition and amenities, as well as data about businesses, land, property, vehicles, and livestock. LIFE and SPOUSE files are labor histories, and each record represents a person-year detailing labor force, family/household formation, and cumulative U.S. experience. In addition, we offer the community file with measures of infrastructure, social resources, public services, labor force participation, and education. Currently, the MMP contains 128 communities, while the LAMP includes multiple communities surveyed in Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Colombia, Peru, Paraguay, Haiti, El Salvador, and Guatemala.

2011 - The Mathematical Association of America MathFest Words: 260 words || 
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2. Carroll, Teena. "Using Two Phased Writing Projects and Rough Draft Meetings For Calculus Writing Projects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Mathematical Association of America MathFest, Lexington Convention Center, Lexington, KY, Aug 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521966_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: St. Norbert College has a writing across the curriculum requirement, where all general education courses must have a writing component. The writing requirement is follows a developmental model; students are given an opportunity to revise and improve their work. When I first began assigning writing projects in my calculus and precalculus courses, I would spend laborious hours writing comments on rough drafts, only to have many of them ignored on the final drafts. I found that if I give feedback in person they were much more likely to improve their papers. Additionally, I found the final drafts much easier and more fulfilling to grade.

Typically I assign a major group project, but I have recently been using a short individual project as a means of choosing groups. I put students together in writing groups whose papers have similar qualities, for example, attention to detail, overall creativity, or similar mathematical errors. Students have reported high levels of satisfaction with groups chosen this way. The first phase allows students to get used to being graded with a rubric, and practice takes away some of the anxiety of having to write a math paper, and allows me to build on the skills they acquire by doing a small project first.

The overall quality of the papers that I have received has consistently risen using these two methods. Students come in dreading having to write a math class, but often self report that the writing project was their favorite aspect of the course.

2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 300 words || 
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3. Timm, Susanne. "The gap of liberation: One project, two Ideas, an educational project bridging Namibia and East Germany" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p487881_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Following South-African air raids against refugee camps for Namibians in Angola, the German Democratic Republic accepted, from 1979 to 1990, some hundred young Namibian children for an educational project, located in the GDR. There the children lived in a special orphan house where they received care and schooling. In 1990 all children (most of them now young adults) returned to the newly independent Namibia.
The project to educate Namibian children in the GDR as result of a two-party-collaboration could have been an example for an exceptional intercultural educational undertaking during the cold war. As such, it would have stood out as an example for solidarity in humanitarian tasks, but also as a project supporting a liberation movement by education. In reality, however, the entire educational process, its planning as well as its practice remained on side of the GDR. The East German actors adapted only minimally the standard school program, thereby imposing conflicting patterns and inconsistent ideals on the project: On one side, there was the Namibian liberation movement. In their context, liberation meant above all the liberation from South Africa’s racist oppression and the vision to create a new and independent nation, fathoming out the possibilities of justice, equity, humanity and a self-determined life. On the other side, there were the East Germans educators, who acted like a consolidated institution, constructed according to the Soviet type of socialism that permeated all societal subsystems and penetrated especially the education system in all its aspects. As a result, this project of educating Namibian children in the GDR for a better and liberated future materialized as a quasi-colonial educational mission.
The talk is based on research in German archives and on published resources. As historical work the research project likewise emphasizes the perspective of comparison, focusing different cultures and conceptions of education.

2009 - North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Pages: 2 pages || Words: 48 words || 
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4. Casa, Tutita. "Project M2: A Research Project Developing Advanced Geometry and Measurement Curriculum for ALL Primary Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, OMNI Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Sep 23, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p319088_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: International and national measures point to U.S. students’ shortcomings in the understanding of geometry and measurement. Insufficient instructional time coupled with weak instruction plagues the primary grades. Project M2: Mentoring Young Mathematicians is a 5-year National Science Foundation research grant undertaking this issue by developing advanced geometry and measurement units for K-2 students and measuring the impact on student achievement. This presentation will provide an overview of the project, including the research endeavors and curricular innovations. It also will outline lessons learned in the areas of research design, curriculum writing, and professional development.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 32 pages || Words: 13250 words || 
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5. Hohle, Randolph. "Political Projects and Embodied Black Political Representation:The Legacy of the Chicago Movement and Atlanta Project, 1966-1968" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 07, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p308330_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Empirically, this paper compares the Atlanta Project to the Chicago Movement to understand how competing political projects within the black civil rights movement struggled to define and bifurcated post-voting rights act black political representation. I develop the concept of a “political project” to capture the normative ideas, discourses, narratives, performances and ethics of a corresponding political tradition. The concept of a political project captures the notion that political struggles are endless and ever changing, come in different combinations, degrees, and measurements, while also capturing their coherent nature, objectives, goals and rationalities that organize mobilization in specified geographic territories. I argue that the legacy of the Chicago and Atlanta Projects created an ‘elective affinity’ between embodied black political representation and black social positioning within the contemporary political field. In Atlanta, activists linked with the black nationalist project and ideas of “black authenticity” and “figurative violence” to revitalize ‘Vine City’ in relation to creating autonomy from the white-controlled slumlord system. In contrast, the Chicago Movement linked with the rights project and ideas of ‘good black citizenship’ to revitalize parts of the Southside by emphasizing good tenant behavior and a shared system of property maintenance in relation to the process of racial integration. While both projects failed to improve housing conditions, the ethics associated with ‘figurative violence’ and ‘black authenticity’ created an elective affinity between urban black political representation and the subsequent balkanization, hyper-ghettoization, etc. of the urban black polity.

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