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2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 223 words || 
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1. Pren, Karen. "24. Office of Population Research / Princeton University, Mexican Migration Project & Latin American Migration Project" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2017-11-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435995_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: Founded in 1982, the Mexican Migration Project (MMP) has annually administered ethnosurveys to randomly sampled households in various communities in Mexico since 1987. In 1998, the Latin American Migration Project (LAMP) was born. For both projects, each community yields approximately 200 surveyed households in the home country, as well as 10 to 20 households of community members living in the U.S. Responses are converted to electronic format and compiled to form five unique data sets. PERS file contains socioeconomic information for each household member, including basic measures of domestic and international migration. MIG file contains detailed border-crossing, measures of migratory experience of family of origin, extended family and friends, and the social and economic characteristics of the last U.S. trip for each household head. HOUSE file contains measures of household composition and amenities, as well as data about businesses, land, property, vehicles, and livestock. LIFE and SPOUSE files are labor histories, and each record represents a person-year detailing labor force, family/household formation, and cumulative U.S. experience. In addition, we offer the community file with measures of infrastructure, social resources, public services, labor force participation, and education. Currently, the MMP contains 128 communities, while the LAMP includes multiple communities surveyed in Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Colombia, Peru, Paraguay, Haiti, El Salvador, and Guatemala.

2011 - The Mathematical Association of America MathFest Words: 260 words || 
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2. Carroll, Teena. "Using Two Phased Writing Projects and Rough Draft Meetings For Calculus Writing Projects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Mathematical Association of America MathFest, Lexington Convention Center, Lexington, KY, Aug 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2017-11-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521966_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: St. Norbert College has a writing across the curriculum requirement, where all general education courses must have a writing component. The writing requirement is follows a developmental model; students are given an opportunity to revise and improve their work. When I first began assigning writing projects in my calculus and precalculus courses, I would spend laborious hours writing comments on rough drafts, only to have many of them ignored on the final drafts. I found that if I give feedback in person they were much more likely to improve their papers. Additionally, I found the final drafts much easier and more fulfilling to grade.

Typically I assign a major group project, but I have recently been using a short individual project as a means of choosing groups. I put students together in writing groups whose papers have similar qualities, for example, attention to detail, overall creativity, or similar mathematical errors. Students have reported high levels of satisfaction with groups chosen this way. The first phase allows students to get used to being graded with a rubric, and practice takes away some of the anxiety of having to write a math paper, and allows me to build on the skills they acquire by doing a small project first.

The overall quality of the papers that I have received has consistently risen using these two methods. Students come in dreading having to write a math class, but often self report that the writing project was their favorite aspect of the course.

2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 300 words || 
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3. Timm, Susanne. "The gap of liberation: One project, two Ideas, an educational project bridging Namibia and East Germany" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2017-11-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p487881_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Following South-African air raids against refugee camps for Namibians in Angola, the German Democratic Republic accepted, from 1979 to 1990, some hundred young Namibian children for an educational project, located in the GDR. There the children lived in a special orphan house where they received care and schooling. In 1990 all children (most of them now young adults) returned to the newly independent Namibia.
The project to educate Namibian children in the GDR as result of a two-party-collaboration could have been an example for an exceptional intercultural educational undertaking during the cold war. As such, it would have stood out as an example for solidarity in humanitarian tasks, but also as a project supporting a liberation movement by education. In reality, however, the entire educational process, its planning as well as its practice remained on side of the GDR. The East German actors adapted only minimally the standard school program, thereby imposing conflicting patterns and inconsistent ideals on the project: On one side, there was the Namibian liberation movement. In their context, liberation meant above all the liberation from South Africa’s racist oppression and the vision to create a new and independent nation, fathoming out the possibilities of justice, equity, humanity and a self-determined life. On the other side, there were the East Germans educators, who acted like a consolidated institution, constructed according to the Soviet type of socialism that permeated all societal subsystems and penetrated especially the education system in all its aspects. As a result, this project of educating Namibian children in the GDR for a better and liberated future materialized as a quasi-colonial educational mission.
The talk is based on research in German archives and on published resources. As historical work the research project likewise emphasizes the perspective of comparison, focusing different cultures and conceptions of education.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 1 words || 
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4. Pren, Karen. "22. Mexican Migration Project and Latin American Migration Project" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2017-11-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p524107_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 598 words || 
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5. Janigan, Kara. "Determining a project’s “success”: Reflections on the Girls’ Education Project in rural Tajikistan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2017-11-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p635870_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore notions of “success” related to the Girls’ Education Project implemented in rural Tajikistan. Since Tajikistan’s independence in 1991 the number of rural girls leaving school after grade 9 has been increasing at an alarming rate. In order to improve rural girls’ secondary school attendance and retention, in 2006 Save the Children, local non-governmental organization (NGO) partners, and the Ministry of Education implemented a two-year UNICEF-funded Girls’ Education Project (GEP). Through my doctoral mixed-method study, I compared rural girls’ secondary school experiences and opportunities at six schools (three GEP schools and three non-GEP schools) in two districts located in regions with the lowest levels of female secondary school participation nationwide.
Two research questions guided my doctoral study: 1) What factors serve as obstacles or enablers to girls’ secondary school experiences and opportunities in rural Tajikistan? and 2) How did the GEP attempt to overcome factors limiting rural girls’ secondary school experiences and opportunities and which aspects of the project were perceived to be most effective?
The study’s theoretical framework contains concepts from two sets of theories: 1) social reproduction (schooling as a means of maintaining and reproducing the status quo) and 2) empowerment (schooling as a means of changing the status quo). Data collected reveals two groups’ perspectives: 1) adult participants (Ministry of Education officials, NGO staff, school administrators and teachers) and 2) rural female upper secondary school students. A multi-level data analysis process was used to compare findings within and across districts.
Factors that serve as either an obstacle or an enabler of girls’ educational experiences and opportunities include those relating to the community/society, family, school, and self. Factors related to community/society include the dominant belief that a girl is “grown-up” by 15 and should no longer go to school which intersects with family poverty to create a major barrier to girls’ non-compulsory secondary schooling. Factors affecting girls’ schooling related to the family were the most significant determinant of a girl’s schooling. Of all the GEP activities, participants consistently considered the girls’ overnight camp to be the “best” activity. Findings show how enabling just a few girls to return to school significantly increases the likelihood of other girls being allowed to attend school in these rural communities.
Throughout the research process I considered notions of this project’s “success”. Despite the short duration of the GEP (two years), and the fact that I conducted the research a little more than one year after the project had ended, there is evidence that the project activities did enable girls to return to school who would otherwise not have had this opportunity and it enhanced their experiences while in school. From a statistical perspective the number of girls who returned to school was not numerically significant (for example, where they previously were only one or two girls in grades 10 or 11 maybe there were 8 or 10 during the GEP). However, from a humanistic perspective and considering the experiences of each girl to be of importance, these results are significant. Most importantly, female students who participated in various GEP activities described many experiences that they otherwise would never have.
This study is significant to the field of Comparative and International Education because it aims to address two persistent research gaps within the field of girls’ and women’s education in low-income countries: to gain a deeper understanding of the factors affecting rural girls’ schooling in Tajikistan, as well as gain a deeper understanding of an NGO intervention, the GEP, implemented to address factors limiting and/or hindering in order to improve girls’ educational experiences, opportunities and achievement.

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